Marvin Edward Lawrence1

Male, #45811, (19 Sep 1917 - 3 Oct 1995)
Birth*19 Sep 1917 He was born on 19 Sep 1917 at Winnfield, Winn Parish, Louisiana.2,3 
Marriage* He married Minnie Marjorie Culpepper.1 
Death of Spouse28 Jul 1984 His wife Minnie Marjorie Culpepper died on 28 Jul 1984 at Winnfield, Winn Parish, Louisiana.1 
Death*3 Oct 1995 He died at Shreveport, Caddo Parish, Louisiana, on 3 Oct 1995 at age 78.3 

Family

Minnie Marjorie Culpepper (17 Oct 1920 - 28 Jul 1984)
Last Edited17 Aug 2002

Citations

  1. E-mail written 2002-2008 to Culpepper Connections from Hershel Laroy Culpepper (#45725), Shreveport, LA, e-mail address.
  2. E-mail written 2002-2008 to Culpepper Connections from Hershel Laroy Culpepper (#45725), Shreveport, LA, e-mail address.
    has 17 Sep 1917.
  3. U.S. Social Security Administration, compiler, Social Security Death Index (SSDI), Online database at Ancestry.com.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/vital/ssdi/main.htm

Johnie Robert Culpepper1

Male, #45812, (29 Jul 1929 - 22 Dec 2010)
Father*James Daniel Culpepper2,1 (1 Jul 1893 - 25 Oct 1978)
Mother*Minnie Belle Foshee2,1 (23 Sep 1893 - 14 Jul 1930)
Birth*29 Jul 1929 He was born on 29 Jul 1929 at Ruston, Lincoln Parish, Louisiana.1 
Death of Mother14 Jul 1930 His mother Minnie Belle Foshee died on 14 Jul 1930 at Dubberly, Webster Parish, Louisiana
Korean War*between 1950 and 1951 He served in the Korean War between 1950 and 1951
(US Air Force.)1 
Death of Father25 Oct 1978 His father James Daniel Culpepper died on 25 Oct 1978 at Ruston, Lincoln Parish, Louisiana.3 
Residence*Dec 2010 Johnie resided at Carlsbad, Eddy Co., New Mexico, in Dec 2010.1 
Death*22 Dec 2010 He died at Lubbock, Lubbock Co., Texas, on 22 Dec 2010 at age 81.1 
Obituary*24 Dec 2010 Johnie Robert Culpepper, 81, of Live Oak Place, Carlsbad, N.M., passed away Wednesday, Dec. 22, 2010, at Covenant Specialty Hospital, Lubbock, Texas. Visitation will be 4-7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 27, 2010, at Denton-Wood Funeral Home.
     Funeral services are scheduled for 2 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 28, 2010, at Denton-Wood Funeral Home Chapel with Bishop John Vande Kraats conducting. Interment will follow in Carlsbad Cemetery, Carlsbad, N.M. Carlsbad Veterans Honor Guard will provide military honors. Denton-Wood Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements.
     Johnie Robert Culpepper was born July 30, 1929, in Ruston, La., to James Daniel and Minnie Belle (Foshe) Culpepper. Johnie was a member of the U.S. Air Force during the Korean Conflict. He married Evelyn Hickman in 1946 in Roswell, N.M. Johnie was employed for 6 years in the potash mines, then went into clothing sales. He was a square dance caller in Roswell for 25 years for the Circle Square, Square Dance Club, he also taught country line dancing for 10 years at the Ponderosa Center (which they owned and operated) both in Roswell. Johnie was an avid Dallas Cowboy football fan and kept abreast of current events by keeping up with the news. He liked to travel, spending time with family, fishing and camping.
     Johnie was preceded in death by his parents, one brother and one sister.
     Survivors include wife, Evelyn Culpepper of Carlsbad, N.M; daughter Jackie Vaughn and husband J. B. of Carlsbad, N.M; son Johnie Lee Culpepper of Carlsbad, N.M; grandson Jody Temple and wife Lennie of Lubbock, Texas; granddaughter Tammy Berry and husband Danny of Roswell, N.M; five great-grandchildren and three great-great-grandchildren.
     Memorial contributions may be made to, CARC, 902 West Cherry Lane, Carlsbad, NM 88220.
Condolences may be expressed at dentonwood.com.1 
Burial*28 Dec 2010 His body was interred on 28 Dec 2010 at Carlsbad Municipal Cemetery, Carlsbad, Eddy Co., New Mexico.1 

Family

Evelyn Hickman
Children
ChartsOrphan / Joel Culpepper of Harris Co., GA: Descendant Chart
Last Edited31 Dec 2010

Citations

  1. Carlsbad Current-Argus, Carlsbad, New Mexico.
    http://www.currentargus.com/
    Obituary of Johnie Robert Culpepper (#45812), published 24 Dec 2010.
  2. E-mail written 2002-2008 to Culpepper Connections from Hershel Laroy Culpepper (#45725), Shreveport, LA, e-mail address.

  3. U.S. Social Security Administration, compiler, Social Security Death Index (SSDI), Online database at Ancestry.com.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/vital/ssdi/main.htm

Martha Louise Jones1

Female, #45813

Family

Hershel Laroy Culpepper
Last Edited17 Aug 2002

Citations

  1. E-mail written 2002-2008 to Culpepper Connections from Hershel Laroy Culpepper (#45725), Shreveport, LA, e-mail address.

Daniel James Culpepper1

Male, #45814
Father*James Dillard Culpepper1 (22 Oct 1917 - 10 Apr 1957)
Mother*Vera Estella Lawrence1 (2 Feb 1920 - 11 Jan 1999)
ChartsOrphan / Joel Culpepper of Harris Co., GA: Descendant Chart
Last Edited17 Aug 2002

Citations

  1. E-mail written 2002-2008 to Culpepper Connections from Hershel Laroy Culpepper (#45725), Shreveport, LA, e-mail address.

Melba Lucille Culpepper1

Female, #45815
Father*James Dillard Culpepper1 (22 Oct 1917 - 10 Apr 1957)
Mother*Vera Estella Lawrence1 (2 Feb 1920 - 11 Jan 1999)

Family

Robert McKay Frampton
ChartsOrphan / Joel Culpepper of Harris Co., GA: Descendant Chart
Last Edited17 Aug 2002

Citations

  1. E-mail written 2002-2008 to Culpepper Connections from Hershel Laroy Culpepper (#45725), Shreveport, LA, e-mail address.

Robert McKay Frampton1

Male, #45816

Family

Melba Lucille Culpepper
Last Edited17 Aug 2002

Citations

  1. E-mail written 2002-2008 to Culpepper Connections from Hershel Laroy Culpepper (#45725), Shreveport, LA, e-mail address.

Jimmie Lynell Culpepper1

Male, #45817
Father*James Dillard Culpepper1 (22 Oct 1917 - 10 Apr 1957)
Mother*Vera Estella Lawrence1 (2 Feb 1920 - 11 Jan 1999)
ChartsOrphan / Joel Culpepper of Harris Co., GA: Descendant Chart
Last Edited17 Aug 2002

Citations

  1. E-mail written 2002-2008 to Culpepper Connections from Hershel Laroy Culpepper (#45725), Shreveport, LA, e-mail address.

John Wade Ellis Foshee1

Male, #45818, (Nov 1859 - Jun 1948)
Birth*Nov 1859 He was born in Nov 1859 at Coosa Co., Alabama.1 
Marriage*Apr 1881 He married Melissa Jane Alred in Apr 1881 at age 21.1 
Death of SpouseAug 1943 His wife Melissa Jane Alred died in Aug 1943 at Hot Springs, Garland Co., Arkansas.1 
Death*Jun 1948 He died at Webster Parish, Louisiana, in Jun 1948 at age 88.1 

Family

Melissa Jane Alred (Dec 1859 - Aug 1943)
Child
Last Edited17 Aug 2002

Citations

  1. E-mail from Henry Royce Culpepper Jr. (#1714), e-mail address, Mt. Juliet, Tennessee, (www.culpepper.net) to Culpepper Connections, 1998-2010.

Melissa Jane Alred1

Female, #45819, (Dec 1859 - Aug 1943)
Birth*Dec 1859 She was born in Dec 1859 at Mississippi.1 
Marriage*Apr 1881 She married John Wade Ellis Foshee in Apr 1881 at age 21.1 
Married NameApr 1881  As of Apr 1881, her married name was Foshee.1 
Death*Aug 1943 She died at Hot Springs, Garland Co., Arkansas, in Aug 1943 at age 83.1 

Family

John Wade Ellis Foshee (Nov 1859 - Jun 1948)
Child
Last Edited17 Aug 2002

Citations

  1. E-mail from Henry Royce Culpepper Jr. (#1714), e-mail address, Mt. Juliet, Tennessee, (www.culpepper.net) to Culpepper Connections, 1998-2010.

Louis C. Culpepper1

Male, #45820, (28 Aug 1920 - 27 Dec 1996)
Father*William Bryant Culpepper1 (Feb 1897 - 1953)
Mother*Vera Belle Hayes1 (15 Jan 1900 - 13 Oct 1990)
Birth*28 Aug 1920 He was born on 28 Aug 1920 at Jefferson Co., Arkansas.1,2 
1930 Census1 Apr 1930 William, Louis, Jack and Milton was listed as a son in William Bryant Culpepper's household on the 1930 Census at Miami, Dade Co., Florida.1 
Death of Father1953 His father William Bryant Culpepper died in 1953 at Palm Beach Co., Florida.3 
Death of Mother13 Oct 1990 His mother Vera Belle Hayes died on 13 Oct 1990 at Anthony, Marion Co., Florida.4,5 
Death*27 Dec 1996 He died at Marion Co., Florida, on 27 Dec 1996 at age 76.2 

Family

Virginia (?)
ChartsJohn Culpepper of Randolph Co, AL: Descendant Chart
Last Edited11 Jul 2010

Citations

  1. 1930 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 13-46, Sheet 9B Lines 95-100 & 10A Line 1, 360 NW 5th ST, Miami, Dade Co., FL
    Rent=$30, Radio=N, Farm=N
    William B. Culpepper, Head, M, 33, md@21, AR/AR/AR, Mechanical Engineer, WW-I
    Vera B. Culpepper, Wife, F, 30, md@18, AR/MS/AR
    William B. Culpepper, Son, M, 11, Sng, AR/AR/AR
    Louis C. Culpepper, Son, M, 9, Sng, AR/AR/AR
    Milton C. Culpepper, Son, M, 7, Sng, AR/AR/AR
    Jack Culpepper, Son, M, 4 1/12, Sng, AR/AR/AR
    Joseph H. Culpepper, Brother, M, 36, Div, AR/AR/AR, Butcher/Retail Butcher Shop.
  2. State of Florida Health Department / Office of Vital Records, compiler, Florida Death Index, 1936-1998, Online database at Ancestry.com, 2004.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=7338
    Louis C. Culpepper, 28 Aug 1920 - 27 Dec 1996 Co., FL, White, Marion Co., FL, Cert # 149260.
  3. State of Florida Health Department / Office of Vital Records, compiler, Florida Death Index, 1936-1998, Online database at Ancestry.com, 2004.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=7338
    William Bryant Culpepper, Palm Beach Co., FL, Male, White, Vol 1583, Cert 8591, died 1953.
  4. U.S. Social Security Administration, compiler, Social Security Death Index (SSDI), Online database at Ancestry.com.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/vital/ssdi/main.htm
  5. State of Florida Health Department / Office of Vital Records, compiler, Florida Death Index, 1936-1998, Online database at Ancestry.com, 2004.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=7338
    Vera Hayes Culpepper, Cert 107895, Marion Co., FL, White, 15 Jan 1900 - 13 Oct 1990.

Milton Hayes Culpepper

Male, #45821, (10 Jun 1923 - 3 Sep 1978)
Father*William Bryant Culpepper1 (Feb 1897 - 1953)
Mother*Vera Belle Hayes1 (15 Jan 1900 - 13 Oct 1990)
Name Variation He was also known as Dan.2 
Birth*10 Jun 1923 He was born on 10 Jun 1923 at Jefferson Co., Arkansas.3,4 
1930 Census1 Apr 1930 William, Louis, Jack and Milton was listed as a son in William Bryant Culpepper's household on the 1930 Census at Miami, Dade Co., Florida.1 
SSN*between 1936 and 1950 His Social Security Number was issued between 1936 and 1950 in Florida.4 
World War II*between 1942 and 1945 He enlisted in Jacksonville, Duval Co., Florida, and served in World War II between 1942 and 1945
(He enlisted in the US Navy on 29 Jul 1942 in Jacksonville, FL and was assigned to the USS Cabot (CVL-28), a light aircraft carrier. He served on the Cabot from 12 Sep 1943 to 13 Apr 1944. At this time, he was a TMV 3c and was transferred to Torpedo Mates School in San Diego. No subsequent sevice records have yet been found. The Cabot saw action throughout the Pacific until the end of hostilities on 15 Aug 1945. On 9 Nov 1945, she returned home to San Diego, CA. See Wikipedia article on the Cabot and its service:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Cabot_(CVL-28).)5 
Birth of Son14 Jun 1942 His son Edward Esterbrook Culpepper was born on 14 Jun 1942.4,6 
Marriage*say 1948 He married Dorothy Olson say 1948. 
Death of Father1953 His father William Bryant Culpepper died in 1953 at Palm Beach Co., Florida.7 
Death of Son9 Apr 1974 His son Edward Esterbrook Culpepper died on 9 Apr 1974 at Collier Co., Florida.4,6 
Death*3 Sep 1978 He died at Saint Lucie Co., Florida, on 3 Sep 1978 at age 55.3,4 

Family 1

Child

Family 2

Doris E. Foster

Family 3

Dorothy Olson (14 Jul 1921 - 25 Oct 1992)
Marriage*say 1948 He married Dorothy Olson say 1948. 
Child
ChartsJohn Culpepper of Randolph Co, AL: Descendant Chart
Last Edited2 Sep 2010

Citations

  1. 1930 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 13-46, Sheet 9B Lines 95-100 & 10A Line 1, 360 NW 5th ST, Miami, Dade Co., FL
    Rent=$30, Radio=N, Farm=N
    William B. Culpepper, Head, M, 33, md@21, AR/AR/AR, Mechanical Engineer, WW-I
    Vera B. Culpepper, Wife, F, 30, md@18, AR/MS/AR
    William B. Culpepper, Son, M, 11, Sng, AR/AR/AR
    Louis C. Culpepper, Son, M, 9, Sng, AR/AR/AR
    Milton C. Culpepper, Son, M, 7, Sng, AR/AR/AR
    Jack Culpepper, Son, M, 4 1/12, Sng, AR/AR/AR
    Joseph H. Culpepper, Brother, M, 36, Div, AR/AR/AR, Butcher/Retail Butcher Shop.
  2. E-mail written 2000-2005 to Lew Griffin & Warren Culpepper from Angela Marie Culpepper (#40161), West Palm Beach, Florida, e-mail address.
  3. State of Florida Health Department / Office of Vital Records, compiler, Florida Death Index, 1936-1998, Online database at Ancestry.com, 2004.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=7338
  4. U.S. Social Security Administration, compiler, Social Security Death Index (SSDI), Online database at Ancestry.com.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/vital/ssdi/main.htm
  5. Bureau of Naval Personnel, compiler, WW-II US Navy Aircraft Carrier Muster Rolls, 1939-1949, Online database at Ancestry.com, 2007.
    http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=1143
  6. State of Florida Health Department / Office of Vital Records, compiler, Florida Death Index, 1936-1998, Online database at Ancestry.com, 2004.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=7338
    Edward E. Culpepper, Collier Co., FL, White, 14 Jun 1942 - 09 Apr 1974.
  7. State of Florida Health Department / Office of Vital Records, compiler, Florida Death Index, 1936-1998, Online database at Ancestry.com, 2004.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=7338
    William Bryant Culpepper, Palm Beach Co., FL, Male, White, Vol 1583, Cert 8591, died 1953.

Jack Culpepper1

Male, #45822, (7 Mar 1926 - Nov 1966)
Father*William Bryant Culpepper1 (Feb 1897 - 1953)
Mother*Vera Belle Hayes1 (15 Jan 1900 - 13 Oct 1990)
Birth*7 Mar 1926 He was born on 7 Mar 1926 at Jefferson Co., Arkansas.2,1 
1930 Census1 Apr 1930 William, Louis, Jack and Milton was listed as a son in William Bryant Culpepper's household on the 1930 Census at Miami, Dade Co., Florida.1 
SSNbetween 1936 and 1950 His Social Security Number was issued between 1936 and 1950 in Florida.2 
Birth of Son14 Mar 1950 His son Jack Townsend Culpepper was born on 14 Mar 1950 at West Palm Beach, Palm Beach Co., Florida.3 
Death of Father1953 His father William Bryant Culpepper died in 1953 at Palm Beach Co., Florida.4 
Death*Nov 1966 He died at Palm Beach Co., Florida, in Nov 1966 at age 40.5,2 

Family

Joyce A. Latta
Child
ChartsJohn Culpepper of Randolph Co, AL: Descendant Chart
Last Edited6 Sep 2010

Citations

  1. 1930 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 13-46, Sheet 9B Lines 95-100 & 10A Line 1, 360 NW 5th ST, Miami, Dade Co., FL
    Rent=$30, Radio=N, Farm=N
    William B. Culpepper, Head, M, 33, md@21, AR/AR/AR, Mechanical Engineer, WW-I
    Vera B. Culpepper, Wife, F, 30, md@18, AR/MS/AR
    William B. Culpepper, Son, M, 11, Sng, AR/AR/AR
    Louis C. Culpepper, Son, M, 9, Sng, AR/AR/AR
    Milton C. Culpepper, Son, M, 7, Sng, AR/AR/AR
    Jack Culpepper, Son, M, 4 1/12, Sng, AR/AR/AR
    Joseph H. Culpepper, Brother, M, 36, Div, AR/AR/AR, Butcher/Retail Butcher Shop.
  2. U.S. Social Security Administration, compiler, Social Security Death Index (SSDI), Online database at Ancestry.com.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/vital/ssdi/main.htm
  3. Palm Beach Post, West Palm Beach, FL.
    http://www.palmbeachpost.com/
    Obituary of Jack Townsend Culpepper (#61510), published 7-11 Jul 2010.
  4. State of Florida Health Department / Office of Vital Records, compiler, Florida Death Index, 1936-1998, Online database at Ancestry.com, 2004.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=7338
    William Bryant Culpepper, Palm Beach Co., FL, Male, White, Vol 1583, Cert 8591, died 1953.
  5. State of Florida Health Department / Office of Vital Records, compiler, Florida Death Index, 1936-1998, Online database at Ancestry.com, 2004.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=7338
    Jack Culpepper, Palm Beach Co., FL, White, Male, died Nov 1966.

Samuel Culpeper of Barbados, British Guyana or England1,2

Male, #45823, (say 1850 - )
DNA* From DNA and genealogical evidence we conclude that Samuel Culpeper of Barbados, British Guyana or England is a member of the International branch whose most recent common ancestor is either William Culpeper of Hunton and Wigsell, or the Rev. William Culpeper of Barbados. 
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Culpepper of Barbados, British Guyana or England. 
Birth*say 1850 He was born say 1850. 
Marriage*say 1871 He married Emma Anderson say 1871. 
Birth of Sonsay 1880 His son Harvey Culpeper of Guyana was born say 1880 at Barbados
Birth of Sonsay 1880 His son John Culpeper of Guyana was born say 1880 at Barbados
Relocation*say 1885 He relocated say 1885 at Venezuela2 

Family 1

Emma Anderson (say 1853 - )
Marriage*say 1871 He married Emma Anderson say 1871. 
Child

Family 2

Children
ChartsThe Culpepers of Guyana and Puerto Rico: Descendant Chart
Last Edited7 Mar 2015

Citations

  1. E-mail written 2000 - 2004 to Lew Griffin & Warren Culpepper from Sharon Culpeper (granddaughter of Francis Culpeper of Guyana), New York, NY, e-mail address.
  2. E-mail written 8 Feb 1998 (e-mail address as of Mar 2006) to GENMTD-L at Rootsweb.com from Carmen Culpeper Chapell (#52972), http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/GENMTD/1998-02/0886964099, e-mail address.

Harvey Culpeper of Guyana1

Male, #45824, (say 1880 - )
Father*Samuel Culpeper of Barbados, British Guyana or England1 (s 1850 - )
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Culpepper. 
Birth*say 1880 He was born say 1880 at Barbados
Relocation*say 1910 He relocated say 1910 at Guyana; When Harvey Culpeper migrated to Guyana, he owned a plantation called Houston.1 
Research note* The father of Harvey and John Culpeper of Barbados and Guyana is unknown. It is possible, but certainly not proven, that he was Samuel Aloyssus Culpeper. If you can better identify this family, please contact Warren Culpepper.2 
ChartsThe Culpepers of Guyana and Puerto Rico: Descendant Chart
Last Edited11 Feb 2011

Citations

  1. E-mail written 2000 - 2004 to Lew Griffin & Warren Culpepper from Sharon Culpeper (granddaughter of Francis Culpeper of Guyana), New York, NY, e-mail address.
  2. Warren L. Culpepper (#1942), Former publisher of Culpepper Connections, e-mail address.

John Culpeper of Guyana1

Male, #45825, (say 1880 - say 1955)
Father*Samuel Culpeper of Barbados, British Guyana or England1 (s 1850 - )
DNA* The ancestry of John Culpeper of Guyana is unproven. To help prove it, we are seeking a male Culpepper descendant to participate in our free DNA testing project. For more information, go to http://gen.culpepper.com/dna
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Culpepper of Guyana. 
Birth*say 1880 He was born say 1880 at Barbados
Marriage*between 1894 and 1905 He married Marie Francisca between 1894 and 1905. John and Marie Culpepper had 13 children.1 
Birth of Sonbetween 1895 and 1912 His son Edward Culpeper of Guyana was born between 1895 and 1912 at Guyana
Birth of Son24 Jan 1913 His son Francis Patrick Culpeper of Guyana was born on 24 Jan 1913 at Guyana.1 
Death*say 1955 He died at Guyana say 1955.1 
Biography* From Sharon Culpeper, July 2002:
     ... my mother just arrived from Guyana, she was able to confirm that grandfather's name is Culpeper, instead of Culpepper. She also confirmed that my grandfather's family came from Barbados. She also mentioned that two brothers migrated to Guyana, John and Harvey Culpeper. John being my great grandfather. She also mentioned that my grandfather claimed that his grandfather was from England.
     John Culpeper ... was sent to England to be a Minister, but refused and worked as a sailor from ship to ship according to my mother. He eventually settled in Guyana at a placed called Moruca.
     John and his wife Maria had 13 children. Only two are alive my grandfather and his sister.

Follow-up from Sharon Culpepper, Oct 2003:
     ...My grandfather (Francis Patrick Culpeper) married Josephine Evans. She died September 4th, 1998 after being together for over 50 years. His father's name was John Culpeper, according to my aunt he died sometime in the 50S. My grandfather has seven children, Francis Culpeper Jr (living in Guyana), Elaine Culpeper Carrington (living in New York), Patricia Culpeper (living in Texas), Eloise Culpeper (living in Florida), Kathleen Culpeper (living in Belize), Carmen Culpeper Pieters (living Guyana), and Maurice Culpeper (living in Guyana). He has ninteen grandchildren.
     According to my aunt, John Culpeper became a farmer, after his uncle Harvey Culpeper sent him to England to study, in which he did not follow through. Harvey stopped suppyling money and he worked from ship to ship. We do not know how much time he spent in England but he returned and became a farmer. This was due to Harvey having land ownership in Brickdam, Georgetown, Guyana.
     John Culpeper had thirteen children: Kathleen Culpeper, Julie Culpeper, Edward Culpeper, Francis Culpeper, Florance Culpeper (still living and younger than my grandfather). These were the only names by aunt could recall.

Followup from Sharon Culpeper, Dec 2004:
     I am sad to report that my grandfather Francis Culpeper Sr passed on last Saturday, November 21st at the aged of 91.1 
Research note* The father of Harvey and John Culpeper of Barbados and Guyana is unknown. It is possible, but certainly not proven, that he was Samuel Aloyssus Culpeper. If you can better identify this family, please contact Warren Culpepper.2 
Research note* On 7 Nov 2008, Natalie Culpeper wrote: "My grandmother is Florence Culpeper, daughter of John and Marie Culpeper. She is now 91 years old and resides in New York City. She had 8 brothers and sister, all of whom have now passed on. Their names were-Julie, Kathleen, Rosa, Gertrude, Edward, Marie, Francis, and Beatrice. She insists that her grandfather's name was also John not Samuel... Many of Grandma's siblings were married and also had children. Some relocated from Guyana to Venezuela, China, Europe and the U.S. The descendents of Francis Culpeper now live in Guyana and Florida."3 

Family

Marie Francisca (say 1882 - )
Marriage*between 1894 and 1905 He married Marie Francisca between 1894 and 1905. John and Marie Culpepper had 13 children.1 
Children
ChartsThe Culpepers of Guyana and Puerto Rico: Descendant Chart
Last Edited11 Feb 2011

Citations

  1. E-mail written 2000 - 2004 to Lew Griffin & Warren Culpepper from Sharon Culpeper (granddaughter of Francis Culpeper of Guyana), New York, NY, e-mail address.
  2. Warren L. Culpepper (#1942), Former publisher of Culpepper Connections, e-mail address.
  3. E-mail written Nov 2008 to Culpepper Connections from Natalie Culpepper Brown (#59617), New York, e-mail address.

Marie Francisca1

Female, #45826, (say 1882 - )
Birth*say 1882 She was born say 1882 at Venezuela.1 
Marriage*between 1894 and 1905 She married John Culpeper of Guyana between 1894 and 1905. John and Marie Culpepper had 13 children.1 
Married Namebetween 1894 and 1905  As of between 1894 and 1905, her married name was Culpeper.1 
Birth of Sonbetween 1895 and 1912 Her son Edward Culpeper of Guyana was born between 1895 and 1912 at Guyana
Birth of Son24 Jan 1913 Her son Francis Patrick Culpeper of Guyana was born on 24 Jan 1913 at Guyana.1 

Family

John Culpeper of Guyana (say 1880 - say 1955)
Children
Last Edited11 Nov 2008

Citations

  1. E-mail written 2000 - 2004 to Lew Griffin & Warren Culpepper from Sharon Culpeper (granddaughter of Francis Culpeper of Guyana), New York, NY, e-mail address.
  2. E-mail written Nov 2008 to Culpepper Connections from Natalie Culpepper Brown (#59617), New York, e-mail address.

Francis Patrick Culpeper of Guyana1

Male, #45827, (24 Jan 1913 - 21 Nov 2004)
Father*John Culpeper of Guyana1 (s 1880 - s 1955)
Mother*Marie Francisca1 (s 1882 - )
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Culpepper of Guyana. 
Birth*24 Jan 1913 He was born on 24 Jan 1913 at Guyana.1 
Marriage*say 1937 He married Josephine Evans of Guyana say 1937.1 
Death of Fathersay 1955 His father John Culpeper of Guyana died say 1955 at Guyana.1 
Death of Spouse4 Sep 1998 His wife Josephine Evans of Guyana died on 4 Sep 1998 at Guyana.1 
Residence*Oct 2003 Francis resided at Guyana in Oct 2003.1 
Death*21 Nov 2004 He died at Guyana on 21 Nov 2004 at age 91.1 

Family

Josephine Evans of Guyana (say 1916 - 4 Sep 1998)
Marriage*say 1937 He married Josephine Evans of Guyana say 1937.1 
Children
ChartsThe Culpepers of Guyana and Puerto Rico: Descendant Chart
Last Edited11 Nov 2008

Citations

  1. E-mail written 2000 - 2004 to Lew Griffin & Warren Culpepper from Sharon Culpeper (granddaughter of Francis Culpeper of Guyana), New York, NY, e-mail address.

Ella Escue1

Female, #45828, (circa 1878 - )
Father*William W. Escue1 (s 1848 - a 21 May 1901)
Mother*Sarah Ann (?) (s 1850 - a 21 May 1901)
Birth*circa 1878 She was born circa 1878 at Texas
Marriage*circa 1898 She married Adolphus D. Culpepper circa 1898. 
Married Namecirca 1898  As of circa 1898, her married name was Culpepper. 
Birth of Son25 May 1899 Her son Dolphus Culpepper was born on 25 May 1899 at Mulberry, Fannin Co., Texas.1 
Married Name9 May 1900  As of 9 May 1900, her married name was Neely. 
Marriage*9 May 1900 She married J. T. Nealey at Ellis Co., Texas, on 9 May 1900.1 
Married Name9 May 1900  As of 9 May 1900, her married name was Nealey. 
Biography* From the Dawes Record, as provided by Pat Roberts, April 2002,
Filed May 21, 1901. At the time of application she was remarried.
Her name is Ella (Escue) Nealey (one place spelled Neeley), age 22, P.O. Box Mulberry,TX.
Lived there 4 years, before that Ellis County,TX., Lived in Texas 6 years
Lived in Arkansas before Texas, Born in Texas & moved to Arkansas when she was one year old.
Father: William W. Escue-living-yes. Derives 1/16th Choctaw blood from him
Mother: Sarah Ann Escue-living-yes
Husband: J.T. Nealey, married 9 May 1900 in Ellis County, Texas
Asking application for one son: Dolphus Culpepper 25 Apr 1899, son of Ella and Dolphus (deceased)
There are a lot of questions asking if she has ever signed up before or been to council or the capitol. Answers are no or I don't know. Her grandfather William Frazier was Choctaw.
There is a notation (Applicant is apparently a white woman) I don't know if that is part of this or added for record reasons.1
 

Family 1

Adolphus D. Culpepper (1870 - 1899)
Marriage*circa 1898 She married Adolphus D. Culpepper circa 1898. 
Child

Family 2

J. T. Nealey (say 1876 - )
Marriage*9 May 1900 She married J. T. Nealey at Ellis Co., Texas, on 9 May 1900.1 
Last Edited2 Jun 2011

Citations

  1. E-mail written 1996-2007 to Lew Griffin & Warren Culpepper from Patsy Gay Culpepper Roberts (#6442), e-mail address.

Dolphus Culpepper1

Male, #45829, (25 May 1899 - )
Father*Adolphus D. Culpepper1 (1870 - 1899)
Mother*Ella Escue1 (c 1878 - )
Birth*25 May 1899 He was born on 25 May 1899 at Mulberry, Fannin Co., Texas.1 
ChartsBenjamin (son of Joseph) Culpepper of Edgecombe Co., NC: Descendant Chart
Last Edited18 Aug 2002

Citations

  1. E-mail written 1996-2007 to Lew Griffin & Warren Culpepper from Patsy Gay Culpepper Roberts (#6442), e-mail address.

J. T. Nealey1

Male, #45830, (say 1876 - )
Birth*say 1876 He was born say 1876.1 
Marriage*9 May 1900 He married Ella Escue at Ellis Co., Texas, on 9 May 1900.1 

Family

Ella Escue (circa 1878 - )
Last Edited18 Aug 2002

Citations

  1. E-mail written 1996-2007 to Lew Griffin & Warren Culpepper from Patsy Gay Culpepper Roberts (#6442), e-mail address.

William W. Escue1

Male, #45831, (say 1848 - after 21 May 1901)
Birth*say 1848 He was born say 1848.1 
Marriage*say 1871 He married Sarah Ann (?) say 1871. 
Death*after 21 May 1901 He died after 21 May 1901.1 

Family

Sarah Ann (?) (say 1850 - after 21 May 1901)
Child
Last Edited18 Aug 2002

Citations

  1. E-mail written 1996-2007 to Lew Griffin & Warren Culpepper from Patsy Gay Culpepper Roberts (#6442), e-mail address.

Sarah Ann (?)

Female, #45832, (say 1850 - after 21 May 1901)
Birth*say 1850 She was born say 1850. 
Marriage*say 1871 She married William W. Escue say 1871. 
Married Namesay 1871  As of say 1871, her married name was Escue. 
Death*after 21 May 1901 She died after 21 May 1901. 

Family

William W. Escue (say 1848 - after 21 May 1901)
Child
Last Edited18 Aug 2002

(?) Hall

Male, #45833, (say 1875 - )
Birth*say 1875 He was born say 1875. 
Marriage*say 1895 He married Margaret Culpepper say 1895. 

Family

Margaret Culpepper (circa 1876 - )
Last Edited2 Jun 2012

Hamilton Cooper Rutland

Male, #45834, (circa 1844 - )
Birth*circa 1844 He was born circa 1844 at Mississippi.1 
Marriage*Jan 1870 He married Libby Ivy in Jan 1870. 
Miscellaneous*between 1 Aug 1902 and 1 Jan 1903 Hamilton Cooper Rutland filed a lawsuit between 1 Aug 1902 and 1 Jan 1903 Collins, Covington Co., Mississippi, against Tom Chain and Matthew Martin Culpepper, and these defendants, in turn, filed an answer and cross bill on 15 Apr 1903.1 
Probate*7 Aug 1902 He administrated Mary E. Rutland's estate on 7 Aug 1902 at Covington Co., Mississippi.1 

Family

Libby Ivy (circa 1848 - )
Child
Last Edited28 Apr 2008

Citations

  1. E-mail written 2002 - 2003 to Lew Griffin from Loretta, e-mail address.

Libby Ivy

Female, #45835, (circa 1848 - )
Birth*circa 1848 She was born circa 1848 at Mississippi.1 
Marriage*Jan 1870 She married Hamilton Cooper Rutland in Jan 1870. 
Married NameJan 1870  As of Jan 1870, her married name was Rutland. 

Family

Hamilton Cooper Rutland (circa 1844 - )
Child
Last Edited27 Dec 2003

Citations

  1. E-mail written 2002 - 2003 to Lew Griffin from Loretta, e-mail address.

(?) Rutherford1

Female, #45836, (say 1800 - )
Birth*say 1800 She was born say 1800. 
Marriage*say 1830 She married James William Boykin say 1830.1 

Family

James William Boykin (circa 1792 - 1846)
Last Edited7 May 2003

Citations

  1. Mrs. Bun Wylie -- State Regent 1930-32, Boykin Family Bible (Given to Emily Boykin Tichenor on 16 Apr 1861 by Sam and Laura Boykin), Transcription contained in "Historical Collections of the Georgia Chapters, DAR, Vol. IV Old Bible Records and Land Lotteries, 1932.

Joseph Cooper1

Male, #45837, (1757 - before 6 Sep 1819)
Father*Captain Thomas Cooper1 (1733 - b 13 Feb 1796)
Mother*Sarah Anthony1 (15 Aug 1742 - 13 Feb 1796)
Birth*1757 He was born in 1757 at Henry Co., Virginia.2 
American Revolution*between 1775 and 1783 He provided service in the American Revolutionary War between 1775 and 1783
(DAR Listing: Joseph Cooper, born 1757 in Virginia, died 22 Jan 1819 in Georgia, married Mattie Lewis, Private, Virginia.)2 
Marriage*say 1788 He married Patsy (?) say 1788.3 
Deed*15 Apr 1794 He granted a deed, witnessed by James Harvey on 15 Apr 1794 at Wilkes Co., Georgia,

Book PP, 1796-1798, p. 115, 15 Apr. 1794, Joseph Cooper of Hancock Co., Ga., to James Brewer of co. afsd., for £200, 200 acres in Wilkes Co., Ga. on Rocky Creek waters, being all the tract granted to Samuel Simpson, 13 Dec. 1785. (beginning of deed is 15 Apr. 1794, ending of deed is 15 Apr. 1797). (signed) Jos. Cooper. Wit: Jas. Harvey, J.P., Thos. Crittenden. Regd. 17 July 1797.4 
Relocationsay 1805 He was an accompanying familiy member in the relocation of Thomas Cooper Jr. say 1805 at Popcastle, Putnam Co., Georgia; Below Ashbank lies the Popcastle GMD #308. Here lies the mouth of Lick Creek and the boundary between Popcastle and Rockville District at Long Shoals farther south. Captain William Adams, whose property was at Long Shoals, served as the militia captain for Popcastle District. Many of the families of this district had previously been successful planters and leaders in Hancock County. They provided strong influence and leadership in this community, in Putnam County, and at one time, in Georgia.
Among the prominent families in Popcastle were Major William Alexander (whose house and land was later sold to become part of Turnwold Plantation, with William Turner, Sr., and Jr., Lots #277,278, and 279); Joel and David Reese; William Walker, who had lots on Lick and Crooked creeks and the Oconee River, Lots #261, 262, 276, 286, 287, 289, and 300; Joseph, Thomas, and John Cooper; Rowan and Francis Ward; Thomas Lowe; and members of the Spivey and Rosser families.
By 1811 Joseph Cooper was operating a mill on the Oconee and, shortly after, a toll bridge crossing the river. Thomas Lowe also built a mill on the Oconee. Crooked Creek, as well as parts of Lick Creek, provided fine water resources to many of these planters. Crooked Creek Baptist Church, established even before Putnam County, is within the Popcastle District. Its early roll recalls other pioneer families.1
 
Land Lottery*1805 Joseph, Thomas and John participated in but did not win the land lottery in 1805 at Hancock Co., Georgia,
land in the new Georgia counties of Baldwin, Wayne and Wilkinson.5 
Biography*1811 Below Ashbank lies the Popcastle GMD #308. Here lies the mouth of Lick Creek and the boundary between Popcastle and Rockville District at Long Shoals farther south. Captain William Adams, whose property was at Long Shoals, served as the militia captain for Popcastle District. Many of the families of this district had previously been successful planters and leaders in Hancock County. They provided strong influence and leadership in this community, in Putnam County, and at one time, in Georgia.
Among the prominent families in Popcastle were Major William Alexander (whose house and land was later sold to become part of Turnwold Plantation, with William Turner, Sr., and Jr., Lots #277,278, and 279); Joel and David Reese; William Walker, who had lots on Lick and Crooked creeks and the Oconee River, Lots #261, 262, 276, 286, 287, 289, and 300; Joseph, Thomas, and John Cooper; Rowan and Francis Ward; Thomas Lowe; and members of the Spivey and Rosser families.
By 1811 Joseph Cooper was operating a mill on the Oconee and, shortly after, a toll bridge crossing the river. Thomas Lowe also built a mill on the Oconee. Crooked Creek, as well as parts of Lick Creek, provided fine water resources to many of these planters. Crooked Creek Baptist Church, established even before Putnam County, is within the Popcastle District. Its early roll recalls other pioneer families. (page 126.)1
 
Marriage*say 1815 He married Martha Lewis say 1815.6 
Will*29 May 1819 He made a will at Putnam Co., Georgia, on 29 May 1819, naming as heir(s) Patsy (?), Martha Lewis and Thomas Cooper Jr. It was witnessed by Micajah Cooper.

(Wife--Patsy Cooper; Sons--Urban Cooper, Newton Cooper, Walton Cooper, Joseph Cooper; Son-in-law--Stephen Weston; Daughter--Sophia Ridley; Brother--Thomas Cooper; Wits--Samuel Howell, William Hudson. Codacil to will cites different wife--Martha; Wits--Walter Hamilton, Micajah Cooper, Wilson William.)7 
Death*before 6 Sep 1819 He died at Putnam Co., Georgia, before 6 Sep 1819.8 
Probate*6 Sep 1819 A probate action was taken on his estate on 6 Sep 1819 at Putnam Co., Georgia.7 

Family 1

Patsy (?) (say 1770 - )
Marriage*say 1788 He married Patsy (?) say 1788.3 

Family 2

Martha Lewis (say 1794 - before 2 Feb 1830)
Marriage*say 1815 He married Martha Lewis say 1815.6 
Last Edited30 Apr 2012

Citations

  1. Katherine Bowman Walters, Oconee River Tales to Tell, Eaton, Putnam Co., GA: Eaton, Putnam Co. (GA) Historical Society, 1995.
    Page 126.
  2. DAR Patriot Index, Washington, DC: National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, 2003.
  3. Edward F. Hull, Early Records of Putnam County, Georgia, 1807-1860: Old Cemeteries Wills and Marriages, Ashland, AL, 190?.
    "Wife, Patsy" identified in Joseph Cooper's will. Page 9, cites Will Book A-page 119.
  4. Michael Martin Farmer, Wilkes Co., GA Deed Books A - VV, 1784 - 1806, Farmer Genealogy, Dallas.
  5. Virginia S. and Ralph V. Wood, 1805 Georgia Land Lottery, Greenwood Press, Cambridge, 1964, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 975.8 R2WY 1805.
  6. Edward F. Hull, Early Records of Putnam County, Georgia, 1807-1860: Old Cemeteries Wills and Marriages, Ashland, AL, 190?.
    "Wife, Martha" identified in codicil to Joseph Cooper's will. Page 9, cites Will Book A-page 119.
  7. Edward F. Hull, Early Records of Putnam County, Georgia, 1807-1860: Old Cemeteries Wills and Marriages, Ashland, AL, 190?.
    Page 9, cites Will Book A-page 119.
  8. Edward F. Hull, Early Records of Putnam County, Georgia, 1807-1860: Old Cemeteries Wills and Marriages, Ashland, AL, 190?.
    Will pobated on 6 Sep 1819. Page 9, cites Will Book A-page 119.

John Cooper1

Male, #45838, (say 1769 - )
Father*Captain Thomas Cooper1 (1733 - b 13 Feb 1796)
Mother*Sarah Anthony1 (15 Aug 1742 - 13 Feb 1796)
Birth*say 1769 He was born say 1769 at Henry Co., Virginia.1 
Marriage*say 1790 He married Sarah Weeks say 1790. 
Relocationsay 1805 He was an accompanying familiy member in the relocation of Thomas Cooper Jr. say 1805 at Popcastle, Putnam Co., Georgia; Below Ashbank lies the Popcastle GMD #308. Here lies the mouth of Lick Creek and the boundary between Popcastle and Rockville District at Long Shoals farther south. Captain William Adams, whose property was at Long Shoals, served as the militia captain for Popcastle District. Many of the families of this district had previously been successful planters and leaders in Hancock County. They provided strong influence and leadership in this community, in Putnam County, and at one time, in Georgia.
Among the prominent families in Popcastle were Major William Alexander (whose house and land was later sold to become part of Turnwold Plantation, with William Turner, Sr., and Jr., Lots #277,278, and 279); Joel and David Reese; William Walker, who had lots on Lick and Crooked creeks and the Oconee River, Lots #261, 262, 276, 286, 287, 289, and 300; Joseph, Thomas, and John Cooper; Rowan and Francis Ward; Thomas Lowe; and members of the Spivey and Rosser families.
By 1811 Joseph Cooper was operating a mill on the Oconee and, shortly after, a toll bridge crossing the river. Thomas Lowe also built a mill on the Oconee. Crooked Creek, as well as parts of Lick Creek, provided fine water resources to many of these planters. Crooked Creek Baptist Church, established even before Putnam County, is within the Popcastle District. Its early roll recalls other pioneer families.1
 
Land Lottery1805 Joseph Cooper participated in but did not win the land lottery for land in the new Georgia counties of Baldwin, Wayne and Wilkinson in 1805 at Hancock Co., Georgia.2 

Family

Sarah Weeks (say 1772 - )
Last Edited25 Oct 2002

Citations

  1. Katherine Bowman Walters, Oconee River Tales to Tell, Eaton, Putnam Co., GA: Eaton, Putnam Co. (GA) Historical Society, 1995.
    Page 126.
  2. Virginia S. and Ralph V. Wood, 1805 Georgia Land Lottery, Greenwood Press, Cambridge, 1964, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 975.8 R2WY 1805.

Mark Anthony Cooper1

Male, #45839, (20 Apr 1800 - 17 Mar 1885)
Father*Thomas Cooper Jr.1 (1771 - 5 Jul 1843)
Mother*Judith Harvey1 (s 1775 - )
Birth*20 Apr 1800 He was born on 20 Apr 1800 at Hancock Co., Georgia.1 
Marriage*23 Aug 1821 He married Mary Evaline Flournoy on 23 Aug 1821 at age 21.2 
Death of Spouse1 Dec 1821 His wife Mary Evaline Flournoy died on 1 Dec 1821 at Eatonton, Putnam Co., Georgia.3 
Marriage*6 Jan 1826 He married Sophronia A. R. Randle on 6 Jan 1826 at age 25.1,4 
Will13 Jul 1829 He attested to the validity of William Flournoy's will on 13 Jul 1829 at Putnam Co., Georgia.5 
Probate13 Jun 1831 He witnessed the probate of the estate of William Flournoy on 13 Jun 1831 at Putnam Co., Georgia.5 
Letter*14 Apr 1835 He had a letter at the Post Office on 14 Apr 1835 at Putnam Co., Georgia, (also on 14 Jul 1835 and 19 Jan 1836.)6 
Indian Wars*1836 He served in one of the Creek and Seminole Indian Wars in 1836
(Major in Second Seminole Indian War. See his Biography for further details.)7 
Will29 May 1843 In Thomas Cooper Jr.'s will, Mark, Samuel and Eugenius was named by Thomas to handle his estate on 29 May 1843.8 
Death of Father5 Jul 1843 His father Thomas Cooper Jr. died on 5 Jul 1843 at Putnam Co., Georgia.9 
Will28 Apr 1848 Narcissa, Francis, Samuel and Mark named as executor(s) in the will of Dr. Samuel Boykin at Muscogee Co., Georgia, on 28 Apr 1848.10 
Death*17 Mar 1885 He died at Etowah, Bartow Co., Georgia, on 17 Mar 1885 at age 84.1 
Biography* COOPER, MARK ANTHONY. Lawyer, politician, businessman. Born Hancock County, Ga., 20 April 1800; died Bartow County, Ga., 17 March 1885. Son of Thomas and Judith Harvey Cooper. Married Mary Evaline Flournoy, 23 August 1821. Children: none. Married Sophronia A. R. Randle, 12 January 1826. Children: Thomas L., John Frederick, Mark Eugene, Volumnia A., Rosa L., and at least five others. Education: Mount Zion Academy and Powellton Academy (both in Hancock County); University of Georgia; South Carolina College, A.B. (1819).
     Mark Cooper was born into a prominent Hancock County family that had migrated to Georgia from Virginia. After graduation from college he moved to Eatonton, read law, and was admitted to the bar in 1821. He formed a partnership with James Clark and developed a successful practice.
     In 1833 Cooper was elected to the state legislature from Putnam County as a state-rights advocate. He opposed efforts to reduce the size of the House and supported nullification efforts. In 1831 Cooper and Charles P Gordon recognized the future of railroads and secured a charter for a railroad line from Augusta to Eatonton. This was superseded in 1833 by a charter that authorized a railroad from Augusta to Athens, Madison, or Eatonton and became the basic charter of the Georgia Railroad and Banking Company.
     Cooper achieved a degree of notoriety in 1836 when he was made commander of a battalion of Georgia volunteers who went to Florida to fight in the Seminole War. Cooper was under the overall command of General Winfield Scott and soon incurred his wrath. Governor William Schley had sent a supply of bacon to the Georgia troops, and Scott tried to appropriate it for distribution to his general command. Cooper refused to surrender it, directly challenging Scott's authority. After a mediation session, both compromised on an equitable distribution.
     In 1835 Cooper sold his business interests in Eatonton (which included the Eatonton Factory, one of the earliest cotton mills in Georgia) and moved to Columbus. After securing a liberal charter from the legislature, he opened a bank, the Western Insurance and Trust Company. Cooper's high interest rates angered many local citizens and even prompted Alexander H. Stephens to charge Cooper with operating "the most unequal, unrestricted and iniquitous chartered institution in the State."
     Cooper sold the business and was elected as a State Rights Whig to the Twenty-sixth Congress (1839-41). He lost his bid for re-election in 1840 but was chosen to fill the unexpired term created by the resignation of William C. Dawson. He was elected to the Twenty-eighth Congress as a Democrat, serving from 3 January 1842 to 26 June 1843. He resigned to run for governor, but was defeated by his former classmate George W Crawford.
     In 1842 Cooper had moved his residence to Bartow County and retired there after his political defeat. He established the Etowah Iron Works, later adding a rolling mill and nail factory to the operation. He supervised the construc­tion of several railroads in northwest Georgia and was a pioneer in the opening of coal mines in Dade County.
     Before the Civil War Cooper was a leading southern advocate of economic diversification. He felt that Georgia's mineral resources could be developed to a level at least equal to that of cotton production, providing economic independence for the state. In 1846 he helped organize the South Central Agricultural Society, one of the first such state societies formed in the South.
     Cooper's only other venture into politics came in 1876, when he served briefly as state senator from Bartow County. Cooper supported higher education in Georgia, serv­ing as an early trustee of Mercer University and a trustee of the University of Georgia for nearly fifty years. He died at his home, Glen Holly, in Bartow County on 17 March 1885 and was buried on his estate.1
 
Biography MARK ANTHONY COOPER, who did so much to develop the resources of Georgia, came of a numerous family which had migrated from Virginia to Georgia. He was born in Hancock county, Ga., near Powellton, on April 20, 1800, and died at Etowah, in Bartow county, in the eighty-fifth year of his age. His father was Thomas Cooper, a son of Thomas and Sallie Cooper. Sallie Cooper, grandmother of Mark A. Cooper, was the oldest child of Joseph Anthony, a descendant of Mark Anthony, who was a native of Holland.
     It is worthy of note at this point that William Candler, the progenitor of the distinguished Candler family in Georgia, married Elizabeth Anthony, a younger sister of the Sallie Anthony, who married Thomas Cooper.
     This Mark Anthony had a remarkable career. His father was a native of Genoa, in Italy, and being driven from that country for some reason-religious persecution possibly being the cause, emigrated to Holland. Influenced by the advantages of his native land, he sent his young son Mark back to Italy to be educated. At the school, being ill treated, he ran away to sea with a companion, and was captured by Algerian pirates. The two young men were sold as slaves, put in chains under guard and were set to cutting wood. Being mercilessly treated they determined to escape, and while the attention of the guard wandered for a moment, they knocked him on the head with an axe, broke their chains, and hid themselves in a wood. At night they boarded a British ship in the harbor and persuaded the captain to hide them in a hogshead, on which he piled sacks of coffee. The Algerians searched the ships for the fugitives, but did not remove the coffee sacks and failed to find the young men.
     When the ship left the harbor, they were released and transferred to a ship bound for Virginia, in which new country they decided to settle. Mark Anthony prospered in Virginia and became the ancestor of a numerous family in that State, which, by intermarriage with the Candlers and Coopers and others, now has descendants all over the southern part of the Union, and has given many distinguished men in the learned professions, in business circles and to public life.
     Thomas Cooper, the grandfather of Mark A., had eleven children. One of his younger daughters, Penelope, was the mother of Judge Eugenius A. Nisbet. Thomas Cooper, the second, father of Mark, married Judith Harvey, a daughter of James and Sarah Harvey, and they reared a numerous family. The Harveys, Coopers, Anthonys and Clarks were all from Virginia, and settled in Wilkes and Hancock counties, Ga., most of them near Powellton.
     Mark A. was one of three sons, two of whom died in infancy. He had three sisters, of whom Harriet married a Nisbet, Narcissa a Boykin, and Emma a Branham. Mark went to school in Hancock county to John Denton, Dr. David Cooper and Mark Andrews.
     Later he attended the Mount Zion Academy, under the famous S. S. Beman and Benjamin Gildersleeve. At the Powellton Academy he studied under Iva Ingraham. He then went to Franklin College, at Athens, but on account of the death of Dr. Findley he went to the South Carolina College, of which Dr. Maxey was president. In 1819 he was graduated with the degree of A.B., and in a class in which William Hance Taylor held first honor, C. G. Memminger second honor, and Franklin H. Elman and Mark A. Cooper third honor.
     Leaving college he entered the law office of Judge Strong, in Eatonton, Ga., and was admitted to the bar in 1821. He at once engaged in the practice at Eatonton in partnership with James Clark. The bar of that town at that time comprised some of the most brilliant lawyers in Georgia history, including such men as Alfred Iverson, Mirabeau Lamar, William II. Parks, Samson W. Harris, and others. The elder lawyers at the bar of the circuit at that time included a list of many of the most famous men of Georgia in the antebellum period. There was no Supreme Court in the State, no such great volumes of reports as are now at the service of practicing lawyers, and they had to rely on the trial decision of the courts then in existence. By attending every term of the court and watching closely, Mark Cooper arrived at a thorough knowledge of practice, with a correct understanding of law and the ability to apply it properly. He reported for his own pleasure the litigated cases until it made a volume in manuscript. He was a close and hard student, and the young firm soon began to make headway.
     They grew in influence and in the number of their clients, until in 1838 he was elected to Congress. In the meantime he had inherited a small sum of money and had put it out to interest, and this with the earnings of his practice had accumulated a competency. He had tried planting, but found the lending of his capital brought more profit and less trouble.
     Although he had made a success at the bar, his business qualifications were so strong and his bent in that direction so decided that about 1833 he organized a company with fifty thousand dollars capital and built a cotton factory on Little River, near Eatonton. He furnished the plan of the building, superintended its construction and adjustment of the water power. This was the first well-built water factory in Georgia, except that of Mr. White, at Athens. By this time he had decided to move to Columbus, Ga., and engage in banking. He sold his stock in the cotton factory for par and interest, collected the money due him and went to Columbus about 1835.
     At Columbus he organized a banking company, with two hundred thousand dollars cash capital, and began business as a banker of discount and deposit. He declined to issue bills as was customary at that time. Aided by a strong board of directors he managed this bank successfully over long years, which included the panic of 1837. He and his brother-in-law, Dr. Boykin, owned or controlled nearly all the stock, and all the stockholders were personal friends. The bank was successful and paid annual dividends of sixteen per cent.
     Back in 1831, in connection with Charles P. Gordon, he had agitated the building of a railroad from Augusta to Eatonton. This was the first movement looking to the actual building of a road in Georgia. In 1833 he served in the State Legislature. with this same Charles P. Gordon, and they obtained a charter superseding the one granted in 1831, and this charter with various amendments, is now the charter of the Georgia Railroad and Banking Company. It was drafted in 1833 by William Williams, of Eatonton, Ga., and under that charter the road was built to Madison, Covington, Decatur, and to a place called Marthasville, (now the city of Atlanta), with a branch to Athens. From Atlanta, the State of Georgia, in the midst of great opposition and trouble, built a road to Chattanooga, then called Ross Landing, on the Tennessee River.     Mark A. Cooper was a warm and zealous advocate of this measure. A great celebration took place upon the completion of the road, in which Mr. Cooper was a very prominent figure, and thus he had the pleasure of seeing his dream of 1831 realized -- a railroad from Augusta to Chattanooga. Later on, with his own means, he built a branch of this road to his works, at Etowah, and was a prime factor in the building of the Cartersville and Van Wert Railroad, afterwards extended to Cedartown, and called the East and West Railroad.
     By this time Major Cooper had come to be recognized as one of the foremost developers of the State. About 1842 he bought from Messrs. Stroup a half interest in the iron furnace on Stamp creek, in Bartow county, with about thirteen hundred acres of land. The old furnace was replaced with a new one with ample facilities for the manufacture of pig iron and hollow ware. As the market for iron was in New York and the price obtainable was not a profitable one for charcoal iron, they built a rolling mill, at. a cost of thirty thousand dollars, and after that a nail factory with the necessary shops for both, and a store with a full supply of goods, and houses for five hundred work people. A stone mill, five stories high, with a capacity of three hundred barrels of flour per day was erected, at a cost of fifty thousand dollars, while the lands of the company were increased until they covered an area of twelve thousand acres.
     L. M. Wiley, a native Georgian, then a resident of New York, became interested with Cooper and Stroup. Mr. Stroup was unable to pay his share of the improvements and Mr. Cooper bought him out. Then it was found that the firm owed an immense sum, for that day, one hundred thousand dollars, to Mr. Wiley's New York house. Mr. Wiley insisted that Mr. Cooper should buy the property on three years' time. He did so and paid out the debt. He pushed the flour mill and made a success of that, and for many years, notwithstanding difficulties, continued in the iron business, building a railroad four miles long to connect with the W&A, became a coal shipper, and in 1862, after twenty years struggle, he sold the property for four hundred and fifty thousand dollars, paid all, and had two hundred thousand dollars left. This iron business was the great work of his life, and in it he was a leader of unsual enterprise for that period.
     To go back a little, in 1836, there were troubles with the Seminole Indians. Five companies of volunteers were organized at Macon into a battalion, and Mark A. Cooper elected as major and commanding officer. He took active part in the campaign in Florida, the story of which being one of the most interesting of his life, involving his facing General Scott in defense of what he believed to be the rights of his men and carrying his point because he convinced the general of the merits of his case.
     When the Civil War broke out, he had a very notable interview with President Davis on his way from Montgomery to Richmond and gave him some advice, which in the light of later events was prophetic. Three of Major Cooper's sons fought in the first battle of Manassas, one a major, one a captain, and one a lieutenant. One of them lost his life in that first struggle. In an interview that he had with Mr. Memminger, a former classmate, and then secretary of the treasury for the Confederacy, Mr. Cooper with his usual business foresight urged upon Mr. Memminger to base his Confederate currency upon cotton by buying every bale of cotton in the Confederacy and valuing the currency on it as a redeeming fund. It is clear now that if this advice had been taken the Confederate currency would never have depreciated.
     Commenting on the war and its management years afterwards Major Cooper said, "The Confederate cause was lost, not for lack of men, as I think, but for want of fidelity and faithfulness in the States that seceded; not for lack of money, but for lack of wisdom in the management of its resources. As to the cause of war, it is chargeable not to the abolition of slavery, which was only an incident and exciting cause, but to the capital of the country seeking to control the government through its indebtedness and to foster itself by exemptions and immunities and by profits on the currencies made and controlled by it. War alone could furnish a pretext for doing what it desired." As to the future, he said: "As to the hope for the Constitution and friends of a limited government with definite delegated power and resumed rights in the States, it depends on the full and absolute payment of the public debt, so as to abolish all government credits." These brief quotations give some idea of the scope of Mr. Cooper's mind as to governmental matters.
     Whether in law, in business, or in politics, he was a man of the first rank. His first vote was cast for Governor George M. Troup, the great apostle of State's rights, and Major Cooper was all his life a State's right Democrat of the strictest school. In his election to the Legislature and to Congress, he was elected on that platform. As a result of his convictions, he, with E. J. Black and Walter T. Colquitt became involved in a controversy with the other six members from Georgia and there was a very bitter split, as a result of which Messrs. Black, Colquitt and Cooper, who had previously been elected as State's rights Whigs were next time elected as State's rights Democrats. Major Cooper was then nominated for Governor against the Hon. G. W. Crawford, but was defeated, and after that took no part in political affairs, except as a private citizen.
     He was active in all the great movements for the development of his State for a period of more than thirty years. He was the first president of the Georgia Agricultural Society, greatly interested in the State fairs at which his cattle frequently won premiums, was one of the early trustees of the Mercer University, and later became a trustee of the University of Georgia, a position which he held for nearly forty years. As an example of his forecast, it may be mentioned that at a meeting in the interest of Mercer University, held in Washington, Ga., presided over by the famous Jesse Mercer himself, to consider the question of a locality for Mercer University, Major Cooper advocated Whitehall, a village which stood where the city of Atlanta now stands, and told them it would event ually became a populous center. The audience was profoundly impressed with his argument, but seeing that Dr. Mercer had his heart set on another location, he withdrew his suggestion in deference to the venerable old man and the University was finally located at Penfield and subsequently removed to Macon.
     Major Cooper lived to see Whitehall succeeded by the city of Atlanta, and the land he had pointed out for a site of the Mercer University, which could then have been bought for a song, worth more than a million dollars. All in all he was one of the strong men in that growing period of Georgia embraced between 1830 and 1860, a capable lawyer, and a far-seeing statesman. His greatest ability was as a developer and business man, and in that his foresight was almost infallible, and before the end of his own life he lived to see his judgment justified both in political and business matters.
     Major Cooper was twice married. August 23, 1821, he married Mary Evalina Flournoy, who died in December of the same year. On January 12, 1826 he married Sophronia A. R. Randle, daughter of John and Susan Randle. Her mother was a Coffee, sister of General John Coffee. Of this marriage were born three sons and seven daughters. Four of the daughters died in infancy. Thomas L. and John Frederick Cooper fell in battle during the Civil War. Mark Eugene Cooper served through the war, and survived until December, 1907.
     Thomas L. Cooper left three children, the late Dr. Hunter P. Cooper, of Atlanta; Thomas L. Cooper, of Decatur, Ga., and Mrs. Sallie Sanders, of Washington, Ga.
     John Frederick Cooper left three children: John Paul Cooper, of Rome, Ga., Walter G. Cooper, of Atlanta, and Frederick Cooper, of Gainesville, Texas.
     Mark Eugene Cooper never married. Of the two surviving daughters, Volumnia A. married Thomas P. Stovall, and Rosa L. Cooper is unmarried.11

 

Family 1

Mary Evaline Flournoy (1804 - 1 Dec 1821)
Marriage*23 Aug 1821 He married Mary Evaline Flournoy on 23 Aug 1821 at age 21.2 

Family 2

Sophronia A. R. Randle (say 1805 - )
Marriage*6 Jan 1826 He married Sophronia A. R. Randle on 6 Jan 1826 at age 25.1,4 
Last Edited18 Oct 2008

Citations

  1. Kenneth Coleman and Charles Stephen Gurr, Dictionary of Georgia Biography, University of Georgia Press, 1983.
    pages 217-218.
  2. Kenneth Coleman and Charles Stephen Gurr, Dictionary of Georgia Biography, University of Georgia Press, 1983.
    pp 217-218.
  3. Edward F. Hull, Early Records of Putnam County, Georgia, 1807-1860: Old Cemeteries Wills and Marriages, Ashland, AL, 190?.
    "Mrs. Everlina Cooper, Daughter of William & Nancy Flournoy, Consort of Mark A. Cooper, Died Dec. 1, 1821, Age 17 years", page 17.
  4. Edward F. Hull, Early Records of Putnam County, Georgia, 1807-1860: Old Cemeteries Wills and Marriages, Ashland, AL, 190?.
    Mark A. Cooper md. Saphronia Randle, 6 Jan 1825. Page 21.
  5. Edward F. Hull, Early Records of Putnam County, Georgia, 1807-1860: Old Cemeteries Wills and Marriages, Ashland, AL, 190?.
    Will dated 13 Jul 1829 and probated 13 Jun 1831. Page 22: Cites Will Book B-page 101.
  6. Tad Evans, Georgia Newspaper Clippings, Putnam Co. Extracts, Vol. 2, T. Evans, Savannah, GA, 1998.
    page 5.
  7. Tad Evans, Georgia Newspaper Clippings, Putnam Co. Extracts, Vol. 2, T. Evans, Savannah, GA, 1998.
    page 17.
  8. Edward F. Hull, Early Records of Putnam County, Georgia, 1807-1860: Old Cemeteries Wills and Marriages, Ashland, AL, 190?.
    Will dated 29 May 1843 and probated 10 Jul 1843. Page 29: Cites Will Book B-page 178.
  9. Edward F. Hull, Early Records of Putnam County, Georgia, 1807-1860: Old Cemeteries Wills and Marriages, Ashland, AL, 190?.
    "Thomas Cooper, Died July 5, 1843, age 72 years", page 17.
  10. Muscogee Co., GA Court of Probate Records. Transcribed by Warren Culpepper from photocopy by Mrs. Eugene Millsaps III.
  11. William J. Northern, Men of Mark in Georgia, Vol. II, The Reprint Company, Spartanburg SC, 1974.
    Pages 207-214. Biography written by Walter G. Cooper of Atlanta.

Elizabeth Anthony

Female, #45840, (10 Mar 1746 - 14 Jul 1784)
Father*Joseph Anthony Sr. (2 May 1713 - 23 Nov 1785)
Mother*Elizabeth Clarke (15 Feb 1720 - 1813)
Birth*10 Mar 1746 She was born on 10 Mar 1746 at Louisa Co., Virginia.1 
Relocationcirca 1758 She was an accompanying familiy member in the relocation of Joseph Anthony Sr. circa 1758 at Bedford Co., Virginia.2 
Married Name1761  As of 1761, her married name was Candler. 
Marriage*1761 She married Col. William Candler in 1761.3 
Birth of Son1762 Her son Major Henry Candler was born in 1762 at Bedford Co., Virginia.4,5 
Birth of Son1779 Her son Daniel Candler was born in 1779 at Columbia Co., Georgia.3 
Death*14 Jul 1784 She died on 14 Jul 1784 at age 38. 
Will24 Sep 1785 In Joseph Anthony Sr.'s will on 24 Sep 1785 at Henry Co., Virginia, Elizabeth, Sarah, Christopher, Elizabeth, Penelope, Joseph, James, Mary, Agnes, Micajah, Rachel, Winifred, Mark, Bolling and Judith named as heir(s).6 

Family

Col. William Candler (21 Apr 1736 - Sep 1789)
Marriage*1761 She married Col. William Candler in 1761.3 
Children
Last Edited21 Oct 2002

Citations

  1. Genealogies of Virginia Families, .
    Volume I, A-Ch, Anthony-Cooper, page 13.
  2. William C. Stewart, Gone to Georgia: Jackson and Gwinnett Counties and their Neighbors in the Western Migration, Washington, DC: Nat'l Genealogical Society, 1965.
    page 255.
  3. Todd & Gail Cason, compiler, Cason Family Genealogy.
    (Could not find site in Dec 2005).
  4. E-mail written 2004-2011 to Warren Culpepper from Mary Nelson Pazur (3-gt-gd of #50002), Kennesaw, GA, e-mail address.
  5. RootsWeb WorldConnect Project, Ancestry.com: Rootsweb.
    http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/
    Elton Lacey's Family Files; e-mail address.
  6. William C. Stewart, Gone to Georgia: Jackson and Gwinnett Counties and their Neighbors in the Western Migration, Washington, DC: Nat'l Genealogical Society, 1965.
    pages 253-254.