Daniel Grant1

Male, #46176, (1724 - 19 Oct 1793)
Father*Thomas Grant1 (1682 - c Jul 1774)
Mother*Isabella Richardson1 (c 1694 - b Mar 1773)
Birth*1724 He was born in 1724 at Ground Squirrel Meeting House, Hanover Co., Virginia.1 
Marriage*say 1751 He married Elizabeth Tate at Bristol Parish, Prince George Co., Virginia, say 1751.1,2 
Birth of Son21 May 1757 His son Thomas Grant was born on 21 May 1757 at Halifax Co., Virginia.3 
Death of Spouse13 Oct 1763 His wife Elizabeth Tate died on 13 Oct 1763 at Halifax Co., Virginia.1 
Relocation1764 He relocated in 1764 at Granville Co., North Carolina,4 
Death of Fathercirca Jul 1774 His father Thomas Grant died circa Jul 1774 at Granville Co., North Carolina.5 
American Revolution*between 1775 and 1783 He provided service in the American Revolutionary War between 1775 and 1783
(DAR Listing: Daniel Grant, born 1724 in Virginia, died 1793-96 in Georgia, married Elizabeth Tait, Patriotic Service, North Carolina
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Lieutenant in the Continental Army. He was past the age for active service, being fifty-two years of age in 1776.)6 
Relocation1783 He accompanied by family member(s) Amelia Grant, Frances Grant, Thomas Grant, Isabella Grant and Anna Grant relocated in 1783 at Wilkes Co., Georgia.4 
Deed21 Dec 1784 He was granted a deed, witnessed by Thomas Grant on 21 Dec 1784 at Wilkes Co., Georgia,

Edward Black to Daniel Grant, for 40 shillings, on Little River, adj. Grant & Davis, to the Tan Trough Branch, Black's line, Black & Grant's line, 20 acres. (signed) Edward Black. Wit: John Pinkston, James Scarlett, Thomas Grant. Proved 4 June 1787. Regd. 5 June 1787.7 
Deed7 Jan 1785 He was party to a deed on 7 Jan 1785

John Harvey of Wilkes Co., Ga., to Robert Beesley of Lunenburg Co., Va., on Fishing Creek, adj. white oak in Wilkes Co. ...to black oak in Washington Co., Ga., post oak on county line, 537 1/2 acres. (signed) John Harvey. Wit: Thomas Grant, Danl. Grant, Fanney Grant. Proved 4 June 1787, John Talbot. Regd. 5 June 1787. 
Deed31 Jan 1785 He was party to a deed on 31 Jan 1785 at Wilkes Co., Georgia,

James Scarlet to Daniel Grant, for £600 Va. currency, north side of Little River, adj. Davis, Lipham, Hunt's old line, to Little River corner... mouth of a branch Terrell's corner, 750 acres. (signed) James Scarlett, Elizabeth (x) Scarlett. Proved before Walton Harris, J.P. Regd. 5 June 1787. 
Deed9 Mar 1785 He was granted a deed, witnessed by Thomas Grant on 9 Mar 1785 at Wilkes Co., Georgia,

Frederick Lipham to Daniel Grant, for £70, Little River, adj. ..; Lipham, 200 acres. (signed) Frederick Lipham, Prissilla Lipham. Wit: William Cureton, James Scarlett, Thomas Grant. Proved 1 Nov. 1785. Regd. 5 June 1787.8 
Deed19 May 1787 He witnessed a deed grant to Thomas Grant on 19 May 1787 at Wilkes Co., Georgia,

Hugh Blair to Thomas Grant, for £60, on Long Creek, or Clarkes fork, part of tract granted James Dannilly, adj. Gibson, Crews, Muckle, 200 acres. (signed) Hugh Blair. Proved by Daniel Grant, 9 July 1787, H. Mounger, J.P. Regd. 17 Aug. 1787.9 
Deed28 Oct 1787 He granted a deed to Richard Davis, witnessed by Thomas Grant on 28 Oct 1787 at Wilkes Co., Georgia,

Daniel Grant to Richard Davis, both of Wilkes Co., for love & better maintenance, land where Richard Davis now lives on waters of Rocky Creek, adj. N. by Manson, S. by 11rooks, N. by Stephens, S. by vacant, 400 acres. 28 Oct. 1707 (should be 1787). (signed) Danl. Grant. Wit: Thomas Grant, Cornelious (C) Corhom. Proved by Thomas Grant who said that he saw Danl. Grant, decd., sign deed & he believes Cornelius Corhom signed it, 13 Feb. 1794, before Thomas Porter, J.P. Regd. 25 May 1794.10 
Deed2 Jan 1788 He was an adjacent landowner in the deed granted to Stephen D. Gafford on 2 Jan 1788 at Wilkes Co., Georgia, (Samuel Davis and Jane, his wife, to Stephen Gafford, all of Wilkes Co., for 100 guineas, in Wilkes Co. on Little River, adj. Grant, Derrecott, Pinkston, 200 acres. (signed) Samuel Davis. Wit: John Pinkston, John Black, Benj. Thomson. Proved by John Pinkston, Benjamin Thompson, Junr., 3 Sept. 1789. Regd. 3 Sept. 1789.)11 
Deed9 Apr 1788 He was an adjacent landowner in the deed granted on 9 Apr 1788 at Wilkes Co., Georgia,

Absalom Bedell, Esq., and Ruth, his wife, to Peter Terrell, all of Wilkes Co., for £200, where Peter Terrell now lives, N. side of Little River, 520 acres, adj. Little River near the mouth of Grant's Mill Branch, to a branch, down said branch to Beaverdam Creek, up said creek to Foster, to & down the river to beg., part of a tract granted to Bedell, 13 Feb. 1784, and part of a tract granted to William Foster, 20 Feb. 1784, adj. E. by Daniel Grant & Darracott, N. by Chivers, W. by Foster, Nelms & Days, S. by Little River. (signed) Absalom Bedell, Ruth Bedell. Wit: John Talbot, A.J.P., John Bush, J.P., Andrew Burns, J.P. Regd. 29 June 1789.12 
Deed6 Sep 1788 He witnessed a deed grant on 6 Sep 1788 at Wilkes Co., Georgia,

Ambrose Crawford of Wilkes Co., Ga., to Francis Edrington of Fairfield Co., S.C., for 20 shillings, in Wilkes Co., Ga. on Little River waters, adj. Hunt, 26 acres, part of 941 acres of Crawford. (signed) Ambrose Crawford. Wit: Danl. Grant, Claburn Crawford. Proved by Daniel Grant, 4 Nov. 1788, John Wingfield, J.P. before Aaron Lipham, J.P., Moses Lipham said same day this deed was proved before John Wingfield, Esq. by Daniel Grant, he saw Francis Edongton give this deed to Henry Mounger, clerk of court, to record, 23 July 1796. Regd. 28 Oct. 1796.13 
Deed21 Mar 1789 He was an adjacent landowner in the deed granted on 21 Mar 1789 at Wilkes Co., Georgia, (Edward Black and Rebeckah, his wife, and John Black and Ann, his wife, to Thomas Darricott, all of Wilkes Co., for £400, Little River and Beaverdam Creek, 500 acres, except about 20 acres Edward Black sold to Daniel Grant, adj. S.E. by Stephen Gafford, S.W. by Grant, W. & N.W. by Peter Terrell & Thomas Chieves, N.E. & E. by John Wingfield & John Pinkston. (signed) Edward Black, John Black. Wit: David Meriwether, J.P., E. Butler, J.P. Regd. 8 July 1790.)14 
Deed21 Apr 1790 He witnessed a deed grant on 21 Apr 1790 at Wilkes Co., Georgia,

Samuel Freeman of Wilkes Co.,appoint my friend John Cruchfield, my atty. (signed) Saml. Freeman. Wit: Danl. Grant, Robt. Cruchfield. Proved by R. Crutchfield, H. Mounger, J.P. Regd. 9 Nov. 1792.15 
Deed29 Dec 1790 He was an adjacent landowner in the deed granted to Stephen D. Gafford and Frances Gafford witnessed by Thomas Grant on 29 Dec 1790 (Stephen Gafford and Fanny, his wife, of Wilkes Co., Ga., to David Elington of Luningburgh Co., Va., for £300, Little River, adj. S. & E. by Daniel Grant, N. by late of John Pinkstone, W. by late of Edward Black, was in 2 grants, 1 grant, 31 Aug. 1785, other grant, 20 Jan. 1786, 300 acres. (signed) Stephen Gafford, Fanny Gafford. Wit: Daniel Deupree, Thomas Grant, Danl. Grant, Thomas Mercer. Proved by Deupree, 1 Mar. 1791, H. Mounger, J.P. Regd. 1 Mar. 1791.)16 
Deed30 Dec 1791 He was party to a deed on 30 Dec 1791 at Wilkes Co., Georgia,

David Ellington of Lunenburg Co., Va., to Daniel Grant of Wilkes Co., Ga., for £3, in Wilkes Co., Ga. on Little River, adj. said Grant, said Ellington near the road, to Thos. Dericoat, crossing said Grant's Spring Branch, 3 acres. (signed) David Ellington. Wit: Levy Blackinship, Stephen Gafford, Daniel Dewpree. Proved by Stephen Gafford, 9 Apr. 1793, Jacob Early, J.P. Regd. 17 Apr. 1793. 
Deed11 Jan 1792 He granted a deed, witnessed by Thomas Grant on 11 Jan 1792 at Wilkes Co., Georgia,

Danl. Grant to Hazlewood Wilkerson, both of Wilkes Co., for love & affection to Wilkerson, & his daughter, Anna, wife of said Wilkerson, on waters of Little River, adj. Ellington & Jno. Wilkenson, at Crossroads, near a branch, Lipham, to W. side of road, along Ellington, 200 acres. (signed) Danl. Grant. Wit: William Barron, Thomas Grant. Proved by William Barron & Thomas Grant, before Thomas Porter, J.P., 13 Feb. 1794. Regd. 26 May 1794.17 
Deed4 Mar 1792 He witnessed a deed grant to Thomas Grant on 4 Mar 1792 at Wilkes Co., Georgia,

Frederick Lipham to Thomas Grant, both of Wilkes Co., Ga., for £10, land in Washington Co., Ga. on Deep Creek, near branch on an old line, adj. Chivers, 300 acres. 4 Mar. 1782. (Should be 1792 instead of 1782. Washington Co. wasn't formed until 1784). (signed) Frederick Lipham. Wit: Thomas Talbot, Danl. Grant. Ack. before Thomas Porter, J.P., 13 Feb. 1794. Regd. 25 May 1794.18 
Death*19 Oct 1793 He died at Wilkes Co., Georgia, on 19 Oct 1793.19,20 
Burialafter 19 Oct 1793 His body was interred after 19 Oct 1793 at Grant's Meeting House Cemetery, near, Washington, Wilkes Co., Georgia.2 
Probate*8 Nov 1793 Probate action was taken on Daniel's estate, with Thomas Grant, John Owen Jr., Amelia Owen, Frances Gafford, Isabella Davis and Anna Wilkinson as heir(s) on 8 Nov 1793 at Wilkes Co., Georgia,

Daniel Grant. Expressing his belief that slavery is unjust and contrary to the Gospel, he asks that they be freed as soon as a law is made to that effect. In the meantime a limit is set to their service, they being required to pay 10 shillings annually to his son Thomas Grant for their protection, several of which he gives to Thomas. To son John Owen money, and asks that he teach the slaves to read and write. His part of 50 acres of land including mill seat, all other lands he may have any interest in on the Western Waters, stock in trade either personally or in partnership with son Thomas to be divided in five parts, one to be given to the poor, for the purpose of buying books and teaching white and negroes to read the scriptures. The other four parts to my daus., Amelia Owen, Fanny Gafford, Isabell Davis and Anna Wilkinson. Mentions money arising from public certificates in N. C. Son Thomas Grant, John Crutchfield and David Meriwether Excrs. Signed July 4, 1793. Probated Nov. 8, 1793. Alsey Harris, Sarah Beardin, Thomas Darracott, Test.21 
Biography* Daniel Grant was born in 1724 at the old home near Ground Squirrel Meeting House in Hanover County, Virginia. He married Elizabeth Tait. They had five children. He died in 1796 [sic]. He was a Justice of the Peace in North Carolina (whence he had removed with his family from Virginia) during the Colonial period, and was also for a short time a Lieutenant in the Continental Army. He was past the age for active service, being fifty-two years of age in 1776. (From Historical Sketches of the Campbell, Pilcher and Kindred Families, page 331.)
     Mildred Lewis Cobb, a daughter of John Cobb, and a sister of John Addison Cobb, married William H. Jackson, son of Georgia Governor James Jackson. Mildred and John Cobb had a daughter, Martha Cobb, who married Colonel John T. Grant, son of Daniel Grant. John and Martha had one son, Colonel William D. Grant, a distinguished financier and man of affairs. William was the father of John William Grant, and Sarah, the wife of Governor John M. Slaton. (From unknown source)

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WILKES CO., GA SCRAPBOOK, VOL. A, by Janet Harvill Standard, 1970
"First Methodist Meeting House Here" (p. 22)
The first Methodist Meeting House in the state of Georgia was built only a few miles from Washington but this fact continues to surprise many citizens, even long-time Methodists. Probably because the site of the church is no longer on a public road. The granite marker stands today lone and unvisited in an open field.
But when Daniel Grant built this small Meeting House in 1787, it was on the main post road from Powelton to Double Branches (Barnett) to Wrightsboro, Washington, and Lisbon. Daniel Grant with his two sons, Thomas and John Owen, his wife and daughters, came to Georgia from Va. via N. C. in 1784 and made their homesite on this road opposite, but a little south, of the present golf course. When the Grants came to Ga. they were Presbyterians but became Methodists when the itinerate and persuasive Bishop Francis Asbury began stopping overnight in their home. It was for the preaching by the Bishop and for his neighbors that Daniel Grant built this first Methodist Meeting House.
The pioneer Bishop Asbury was a legend in his own time. He was a frail and delicate man and already in his forties when he began his lonely rides into the virgin forests of Wilkes. Fording rivers and creeks, enduring the dark and dangerous Indian trails, spreading his robe in the forest wherever darkness caught him, he spent the rest of his life seeking to bring the Gospel to pioneers in the Ceded Lands of Georgia and in the Carolinas.
He felt that in this new land there was tremendous need for he wrote in his Journal of his distress over rum, rioting, racing. He said it seemed that the whole attention of the people was given over to the settlement of new lands, to Sabbath marketing and trading, to getting rid of the Indians. The Bishop felt such things were "very unfavorable to the work of religion."
Three routes led into original Wilkes - all of them hazardous and bone-wearying. Sometimes, Bishop Asbury crossed the Savannah at Lisbon and came by horseback along the post road to Grant's. Sometimes, he crossed the river at Augusta and came up through Appling and Wrightsborough. Occasionally, he reached Savannah by boat, then took the coastal road into the up-country. There were a few rest houses along the post roads but he confesses in his Journal that they were always crowded, always noisy, the beds filled with vermin and strangers. But there was feed for his horse even if little for himself.
Later, the Bishop bought a carriage which he called the Felicity but there must have been little comfort in this conveyance. He said the roads were often choked with heavy wagons mired hub-deep in the thick mud so that it took twelve hours to go five miles. How good it must have been to reach the Grant's small but comfortable house where dry clothes, a clean bed, and good food awaited him.
Bishop Asbury felt strongly that slavery was degrading and evil and in quiet talks with his host he led him to think the same. In his will, dated July 4, 1793, Daniel Grant made provision for the emancipation of his slaves. The males to be free when they reached the age of 31, the females at the age of 28. He asked his children to do the same. He also requested that his servants be taught to read and write and provided with Bibles and books. He left money to provide teaching for the poor who wanted to learn to read and write. An act of the Legislature was needed to make this will legal.
Daniel Grant wanted every man to be able to read the Scriptures. He must have read his own Scripture very well, indeed.

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"The Story of Wilkes County, Georgia" by Eliza A. Bowen, 1950
Chapter IX: "The Settlers"
Among the first persons found in Wilkes County prior to 1778 were James Harvey, Daniel Grant, Thomas Grant.... (p. 51)
"Daniel Grant was the ancestor of Mr. John T. Grant and his son Wm. Grant, two well known men of wealth in Atlanta, who live in elegance." (p. 55)

Chapter XXIII: "The Early Methodists--Daniel Grant's Will" (pp 131-135)
I have thus spoken of the meeting house built by Daniel Grant and the conferences held there, and now I will speak of the Grants. I think it will perhaps interest my readers more, if I name some of the descendants in this day, of this builder of the first Methodist church in Georgia. Some persons who read this have seen in Atlanta, on Peachtree Street, a handsome house surrounded by a beautiful grove and gardens where lives the widow of Mr. John T. Grant, a wealthy gentleman who died a few years ago. Also many have read in the social column of the Constitution, of the gay parties at the house of Mr. W. D. Grant.     These are the descendants of the Daniel and Thomas Grant who came here in 1784, and who are found on the old jury lists of our court records; who are to this day remembered as the early supporters of the Methodist cause in Georgia. The children of Mr. W. D. Grant are doubly connected with Wilkes, as their mother is a descendant of Thomas Wingfield who settled near the big gully. The family are still Methodists.
The Grants settled as I have said, on the Double Wells road, between Washington and what is now called Moore's Mill on Little river. Their land now belongs to the widow of Judge Charles Wingfield. Daniel Grant was probably a rather old man when he came to Georgia, for he died in 1793. His son Thomas Grant had probably reached his prime when they came in 1784, for he had been a revolutionary soldier.     They came from North Carolina, but were originally Virginians.     Daniel Grant had been an elder in the Presbyterian church in Virginia, and was still a Presbyterian when he came to Georgia. But the Methodist preachers soon came to Wilkes and he finally became a Methodist. In the "Life of Bishop Andrew", there is a letter from Daniel Grant to Mary Cosby the mother of Bishop Andrew. It was written just one hundred and one years ago and is a letter of encouragement to "Sister Polly Cosby," he calls her, who had met with much opposition from her family in becoming a Methodist. It shows that the writer had not ceased to be a Presbyterian because he could not have Presbyterian services, but that he was Methodist at heart. He considered class meetings, "a great means to keep the life of religion in the soul."
From his will, which is still among the records in our Court House, it seems that Daniel Grant had only two sons, Thomas and John Owen. [Warren Culpepper: Actually, John Owen was Daniel's son-in-law, the husband of Amelia Grant.] He had four daughters [Amelia, Frances, Isabella and Anna]. Judge Andrews told me of two Grants whom he remembered in the county, who were I suppose, the sons of Thomas Grant. One of these, Wm. Grant, was a merchant here, and kept his store where the Masonic Hall now stands at the north east corner of the public square. He married a Miss Mills, who was the sister of Jesse Mercer's second wife. A few days ago, I saw among old marriage licenses in the Court House, that of Wm. Grant and Keturah Mills. There was another Wm. Grant in Wilkes Judge Andrews told me--and he by way of distinction, used to be called "Gentleman Billy Grant," not as my uncle said, that William the son of Thomas Grant was not a gentleman, but because the other "had more manner." Besides William Grant, Thomas Grant the Methodist seems to have had another son called Daniel Grant, who kept a store early in this century on the Greensboro road beyond old Salem church (now Phillips church.) This Daniel Grant, my uncle said moved to Athens, and was I presume the father of the late Mr. John T. Grant and his son William D. Grant of Atlanta. Mr. John Pettus, the father of Mrs. Lucy Reese, was a clerk of the Daniel Grant who had a store on the Greenesboro road. Finally, Thomas Grant moved away from Wilkes, and from him or his son Daniel, Mr. John Pettus bought the Grant place where the old meeting house stood. The house which was the home of Thomas Grant had, as Mrs. Reese tells me, four rooms down stairs and two up. There was a staircase which ran up in what they used to call the hall room down stairs. I imagine the old house would be a contrast to Mrs. John T. Grant's house in Atlanta now, but it was one of the best houses of its times in Wilkes. It was painted red."
[In the office of the Ordinary of Greene county, there is a thin, flexible back book on which is inscribed - Free Persons of Color, in Greene County. This book contained the names and guardians for all Free Persons of Color, and their guardians or sponsors, had to make returns for each year. There are a number of Grant Negroes listed in this book. On p. 132, Miss Bowen refers to "Daniel Grant, who kept a store early in this century - 1800 - on the Greensboro road beyond old Salem Church (now Phillips church). This Daniel Grant, my uncle said moved to Athens, and was I presume the father of the late John T. Grant, and his son William D. Grant of Atlanta." This Daniel Grant lived in that part of Wilkes that was added to Greene county in 1802. He operated a Tavern, and was on the old stage coach route. Stage horses were changed at Grantville and there was a Post office there. He is the man who liberated his slaves whose record is in Greene county. Grantville is shown on an old map of Greene county; its date is unknown, but is supposed to have been published around 1830, and revised by Dr. J. H. Kilpatrick and John S. Callaway sometime between 1860 and 1880. Mr. Grant is said to have sold his property about the time the Georgia Railroad was being built - 1833-37, and became one of the contractors who built the Railroad to Athens, or from Union Point to Athens. The old Grant home and Tavern was burned some ten years ago, but the chimneys are still standing. There are a number of Grant tombstones near the old home. (By: T. B. Rice, Historian of Greene County September 16, 1940)]
Thomas Grant is said by the historian of Methodism to have been one of the most useful Methodist laymen of his day in Georgia. He used to keep at his house below town, clothing of all sizes for Methodist preachers who might ride up wet, and want some dry clothes. He had a room for the preachers, which he called "Prophets' Chamber." When he died, he left a legacy to the Georgia and South Carolina Conferences. That of the Georgia Conference was $1500 and some land. When he went to New York in 1803, the journey lasted three months and three days.
I must now tell of the will of the first Daniel Grant who came in 1784 and died in 1793. To make what I say understood, I must tell my readers that Bishop Asbury, and especially Bishop Coke, thought that slavery was a great wrong and sought to make the emancipation of negroes a condition of church membership. Bishop Coke was very obstinate in this matter, and thus destroyed his influence. Bishop Asbury, who as I said, was more interested in spreading the Gospel than in anything else, soon saw that the only chance he could have to preach the Gospel in the south at all was not to make the emancipation of a man's negroes the condition of communion. That it was a condition however, at the very first, is proved from the fact which comes down to us through family traditions that Garland Wingfield was turned out of the church for owning negroes. The reader must take note that this is not the Garland Wingfield whom many of us remember, but his uncle. This excommunication must have taken place very early indeed.
Bishop Asbury submitted, not to make it a question of communion, but he was of the same opinion, as his journal shows plainly. He tells us that he thought the Yazoo freshet an "African freshet" that is, I suppose, a judgment for making negroes property. In that early day, there had not been much outside interference with the local regulations of Southern States and much freedom of speech on the subject was taken without offence. Bishop Asbury appears to have talked and reasoned about it in private, and he speaks of it in his journal without bitterness. These allusions to slavery are doubtless the reason why a reprint of Asbury's journal has not been made and sold at the South.
In 1793, the year when conference first met in Washington, the Bishop was here. His journal shows that after preaching here Jan. 12, he went out to Grants next day and preached. He staid in the old Grant home, and doubtless talked a good deal with Daniel Grant. Six months after, that is on July 4, 1793, Daniel Grant signed his will, in which he made provision for the emancipation of his negroes. Daniel Grant's will is in the old record book of wills in our court house, and I hunted it up. He begins by saying that he is in hus "usual health" of body and also of mind, reason and understanding! yet knowing that it is appointed unto all men once to die he makes his will. Thus he lets us know that he acts very deliberately not hastily, from the fear of death. First providing for debts, he says, "whereas I am possessed of a small number of slaves, and being fully convinced that perpetual slavery is most unjust and contrary to the natural rights of all mankind, and wishing to release to the best of my power the oppressed, until some future laws can be made in their favor. (and wherever that shall take place it is my will and desire that they avail themselves thereof) in the meantime I do dispose of them in the following manner. In regard to those negroes which I have heretofore given my daughters, I do not consider them as any part of my property, and shall say nothing therefore of their liberation &c though at the same time requesting their owners to relieve these oppressed creatures in some way or other. I do therefore lend unto my son Thomas Grant the following servants, or negroes until the males arrive at the age of 31 and the females to the age of 28, at which ages they shall be liberated so far as only to pay to my son Thomas Grant and his heirs, the males 10 shillings; and the females 7 shillings yearly as a token of subjection and to indemnify him for their taxes and to prevent abuse from others." Then he goes on to state the exact future date in which each male will be 32 years old; each female 28. He provided that none are to leave the state without the written permit of Thos. Grant; and if they do so, they can be captured and made to work 12 months for every such "elopement." He asks his executors to obtain an act of the general assembly to ratify that part of the will. He desires his son to have these slaves taught to read, and at the expiration of their time to clothe them well.
After bequests to his sons he orders his property remaining to be divided into five parts, a part to be given each of his four daughters, and one part to make a charitable fund for teaching poor negroes and whites to read the Scriptures and to furnish them with books. Whether by accident or design we know not, but it is curious that this will was signed July 4.
The executors of the will were Thomas Grant, John Crutchfield and David Meriwether. Gen. Meriwether was a member of the legislature, and got an act passed as requested, for carrying out Daniel Grant's will. There were always since I knew this town, some free negroes in it who owed their freedom to this will. Old Adam, who used to be janitor at the Seminary in antebellum times, was the son of one of Daniel Grant's freedmen. They all called themselves Grant. There is now in Washington a negro of this stock called Daniel Grant. There are others also.
Bishop Asbury says on one of his visits to Georgia, that he was told by James Mark that he would probably emancipate his negroes at death. The Bishop thought that he would probably change his mind and it seems that he did.
 

Family

Elizabeth Tate (1731 - 13 Oct 1763)
Marriage*say 1751 He married Elizabeth Tate at Bristol Parish, Prince George Co., Virginia, say 1751.1,2 
Children
ChartsWLC / Warren L. Culpepper Ancestral Chart
Last Edited30 Apr 2012

Citations

  1. RootsWeb WorldConnect Project, Ancestry.com: Rootsweb.
    http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/
    Mary Stearnes Henley. <e-mail address>
  2. RootsWeb WorldConnect Project, Ancestry.com: Rootsweb.
    http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/
    Sarah Sharpless. <e-mail address>
  3. RootsWeb WorldConnect Project, Ancestry.com: Rootsweb.
    http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/
    :1706924, "Bonds", Rhonda Judge. <e-mail address>
  4. RootsWeb WorldConnect Project, Ancestry.com: Rootsweb.
    http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/
    DB: Marjoeal; Mary Stearnes Henley. <e-mail address>
  5. WorldConnect, Rhonda Judge e-mail address.
  6. Historical Sketches of the Campbell, Pilcher and Kindred Families, page 331.
  7. Michael Martin Farmer, Wilkes Co., GA Deed Books A - VV, 1784 - 1806, Farmer Genealogy, Dallas.
    Book CC, 1787, p. 53.
  8. Michael Martin Farmer, Wilkes Co., GA Deed Books A - VV, 1784 - 1806, Farmer Genealogy, Dallas.
    Book CC, 1787, p. 55.
  9. Michael Martin Farmer, Wilkes Co., GA Deed Books A - VV, 1784 - 1806, Farmer Genealogy, Dallas.
    Book CC, 1787, p. 98.
  10. Michael Martin Farmer, Wilkes Co., GA Deed Books A - VV, 1784 - 1806, Farmer Genealogy, Dallas.
    Book MM, 1794-1795, p. 30.
  11. Michael Martin Farmer, Wilkes Co., GA Deed Books A - VV, 1784 - 1806, Farmer Genealogy, Dallas.
    Book EE, 1788-1790, p. 169.
  12. Michael Martin Farmer, Wilkes Co., GA Deed Books A - VV, 1784 - 1806, Farmer Genealogy, Dallas.
    Book EE, 1788-1790, p. 68.
  13. Michael Martin Farmer, Wilkes Co., GA Deed Books A - VV, 1784 - 1806, Farmer Genealogy, Dallas.
    Book PP, 1796-1798, p. 4.
  14. Michael Martin Farmer, Wilkes Co., GA Deed Books A - VV, 1784 - 1806, Farmer Genealogy, Dallas.
    Book GG, 1790-1793, p. 61.
  15. Michael Martin Farmer, Wilkes Co., GA Deed Books A - VV, 1784 - 1806, Farmer Genealogy, Dallas.
    Book II, 1792-1794, p. 313.
  16. Michael Martin Farmer, Wilkes Co., GA Deed Books A - VV, 1784 - 1806, Farmer Genealogy, Dallas.
    Book GG, 1790-1793, p. 201.
  17. Michael Martin Farmer, Wilkes Co., GA Deed Books A - VV, 1784 - 1806, Farmer Genealogy, Dallas.
    Book MM, 1794-1795, p. 42.
  18. Michael Martin Farmer, Wilkes Co., GA Deed Books A - VV, 1784 - 1806, Farmer Genealogy, Dallas.
    Book MM, 1794-1795, p. 24.
  19. Grace Gillam Davidson, Early Records of Georgia, Vols 1-2, Silas Emmett Lucas, GA, 1932.
    Record of Wills--1792-1801, p. 61. Will was signed on 4 Jul 1793 and probated 8 Nov 1793. He had to have died in between.
  20. RootsWeb WorldConnect Project, Ancestry.com: Rootsweb.
    http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/
    AKBlomquist. <e-mail address>
  21. Grace Gillam Davidson, Early Records of Georgia, Vols 1-2, Silas Emmett Lucas, GA, 1932.
    Record of Wills--1792-1801, p. 61.