Homer Lee Culpepper1

Male, #34972, (3 Nov 1871 - 5 Jun 1951)
Father*Simeon Fletcher Culpepper (11 Oct 1842 - 22 Jun 1929)
Mother*Ellen Clay Nall (5 May 1844 - 19 Jan 1929)
Birth*3 Nov 1871 Homer was born at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia, on 3 Nov 1871.1 
Employment* Homer's occupation: tax commissioner. 
1880 Census1 Jun 1880 Nathan, James, Homer, Edgar and Wilbur was listed as a son in Simeon Fletcher Culpepper's household on the 1880 Census at Meriwether Co., Georgia.2 
Photographed*circa 1892 He was photographed circa 1892 at Meriwether Co., Georgia.3
Homer Lee Culpepper
1900 Census*1 Jun 1900 Homer was listed as the head of a family on the 1900 Census at Greenville, Meriwether Co., Georgia.4 
Photographedcirca 1902 He was photographed circa 1902 at Meriwether Co., Georgia.3
Homer Lee Culpepper
Marriage*26 Jun 1902 He married Esther Theodora Herring at Georgia on 26 Jun 1902 at age 30. 
1910 Census*15 Apr 1910 Homer was listed as the head of a family on the 1910 Census at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia.5 
1920 Census*1 Jan 1920 Homer was listed as the head of a family on the 1920 Census at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia.6 
Death of Mother19 Jan 1929 His mother Ellen Clay Nall died on 19 Jan 1929 at Greenville, Meriwether Co., Georgia.7,8 
Death of Father22 Jun 1929 His father Simeon Fletcher Culpepper died on 22 Jun 1929 at Greenville, Meriwether Co., Georgia.9,10 
1930 Census*1 Apr 1930 Homer was listed as the head of a family on the 1930 Census at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia.11 
Photographedsay 1935 He was photographed say 1935 at Greenville, Meriwether Co., Georgia.3
Homer L. Culpepper - Tax Commissioner
Photographedsay 1940 He appeared as a brother in a family photograph say 1940 at Meriwether Co., Georgia,
standing left to right: Nathan Florence Culpepper, James Wesley Culpepper, Homer Lee Culpepper, Wilbur Clay Culpepper, Thomas Jefferson Culpepper; seated: Edgar Clarence Culpepper.3
sons of Simeon Fletcher Culpepper
Death*5 Jun 1951 He died at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia, on 5 Jun 1951 at age 79.12,1 
Burial*7 Jun 1951 His body was interred on 7 Jun 1951 at Allen-Lee Cemetery, Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia.1 
Biography* According to a daughter, Mrs. Eleanor Culpepper Willingham, Homer Lee Culpepper was nicknamed "Coot." In a 13 Jul 1984 letter, Eleanor added that Homer "taught at Gay in 1902." The following entry appears on p. 343 The Story of Georgia HOMER LEE CULPEPPER --In occupying the office of tax commissioner for Meriwether County, Homer Lee Culpepper is upholding an illustrious family tradition. His father and grandfather both served in this department and were prominent figures in the affairs of their surroundings. Prior to assuming this position Mr. Culpepper had served as superintendent of schools in Meriwether County and also engaged in farming and the dairy business, occupations which he still pursues with success. He has also devoted much of his life to the breeding of purebred July fox hounds and in this capacity has won wide renown throughout the State. As a resident of the city of Greenville Mr. Culpepper has been an active leader in social and civic affairs Mr. Culpepper was born in Meriwether County November 3, 1871, the son of S. F. and Ellen (Nall) Culpepper, both natives of his birthplace. His father, who engaged in farming throughout his life, served as tax collector and county clerk for twenty years. His grandfather, George W. Culpepper, a native of South Carolina who came to this State and engaged in farming, also served in this capacity for a number of years. Mr. Culpepper's mother was the daughter of Nathan Nall who came to this State from South Carolina. Mr. Culpepper received the early part of his general education in the country schools of Meriwether County and after completing this part of his studies entered the Peabody Normal College and later the old Roch College at Athens. Upon finishing his academic training he began a career in the teaching profession that he was to pursue for a number of years. His first position in this connection was as superintendent of schools in Grantville, where he remained for one year. He occupied the same position in Hogansville for two years, in Morgan for one year and then became superintendent of schools in Meriwether County, continuing in this position for several years. He then entered the dairy business and after conducting this enterprise for five years was named tax collector in 1921. When the office of tax commissioner was created he was elected to the new post and has continued since with outstanding distinction and success. Throughout this period of his life he has maintained his interest in farming, and the poultry and dairy business. An avocation, the breeding of foxhounds, which he started as a hobby when he was a young man eighteen years of age and which he has continued for the past forty-six years, has gained him wide renown in hunting and sporting circles of the State. During this time he has maintained a kennel of thoroughbreds that has always been an object of admiration. Through his deep interest in this hobby he has become a recognized authority and has been solicited to write many articles on foxhounds and fox-hunting for the leading sporting journals of this section. As a recognized leader in the Methodist Episcopal Church in this community, Mr. Culpepper has been the guiding spirit in the erection of the Memorial Church now under construction, which is being built in honor and to the memory of Dr. Young J. Allen, famous missionary in China who was a native of this county. He also has served as superintendent of the Sunday school here for many years. In his fraternal affiliations he is a member of Lone Oak Lodge, No. 415. Free and Accepted Masons, where he is a Royal Arch Mason and Knight Templar. Politically, he supports the Democratic party. On June 2, 1902, Mr. Culpepper married Dora Herring, daughter of J. S. Herring of Meriwether County, and they are the parents of two daughters....
      Homer L. Culpepper took out the following ad in an unknown newspaper on 3 Jan 1934: To The People of Meriwether County: The last Legislature passed a bill consolidating the offices of Tax Collector and Tax Receiver of Meriwether county. The bill provides for a Tax Commissioner to perform the duties of both offices, but to receive only the pay of the Tax Collector as provided under the old law. Under this bill, the compensation formerly allowed to the Tax Receiver under the old law, goes into the County Treasury. This Act becomes effective January 1, 1934 and provides that the Tax Collector then in office and commission shall serve as Tax Commissioner until January 1, 1937. A new Tax Commissioner shall be elected at the General Election of 1936 to take office January 1, 1937. I had nothing whatever to do with the introduction or with the passage of this law, either directly or indirectly. Under the express terms of the law, as the present Tax Collector elected by the people of Meriwether county, I am entitled under its provisions to serve as Tax Commissioner until January 1, 1937. I am advised, and believe, that this provision is legal and valid. However, I am perfectly willing for the people to elect a Tax Commissioner to serve until the next regular term begins. For that reason, I hereby waive the legal right I have for this office under the Act of the Legislature. I have trust and confidence in the combined and impartial judgement of the people, and I do not desire to hold this office unless a majority of the people of the county are willing for me to do so. I have requested the Ordinary of Meriwether county to call a special election for the purpose of electing a Tax Commissioner. I will be a candidate for the office at any special election, or primary election, that may be called. Grantville, Georgia, R. F. D. (Lone Oak). This January 3, 1934 ___________________________Respectfully, ___________________________H. L. Culpepper
      Homer L. Culpepper continued to hold the office of Tax Commissioner until 1948. During this time, it was his job to collect taxes from President Franklin D. Roosevelt who sent the following letter: ______________________Warm Springs ________________________Georgia _____________________________________April 2 Dear Mr. Culpepper,
      I sent the tax bill to the office of the Ga. Warm Springs Foundation last Wednesday, together with check for my own taxes. You should receive both checks by tomorrow. _____________________________________Very truly yours _________________________________/s/ Franklin Roosevelt
      The following related article is from an unknown source: Roosevelt Pays Georgia Taxes Greenville, Ga., Jan 8 (AP)-- Franklin D. Roosevelt's Georgia farm tax was marked paid in full today. Tax Commissioner Homer Culpepper of Meriwether county said the President paid $331 on about 1,000 acres of improved farm land. In adjoining Harris county Tax Collector W. I. Hudson said Mr. Roosevelt paid $30.52 on 884 acres of unimproved property. "He is never delinquent," said Commissioner Culpepper. The chief executive paid his Harris county tax by personal check.
Culpepper said the Meriwether payment was among several checks received from the Warm Springs foundation. The Meriwether payment represented levies on the little White House on Warm Springs and a farm nearby.
      Mr. and Mrs. Homer L. Culpepper also received an invitation to attend the marriage of Franklin D. Roosevelt's son, Elliott, which took place Saturday, 16 Jan 1932, at Bryn Mawr, PA.
      Homer L. Culpepper wrote an article about fox hunting which appeared in an unknown paper: Fox Inspires Tale of Chase By Vet Hunter H. L. Culpepper Pays Tribute to Cunning of Favorite Red. GREENVILLE, Ga., Jan 17.--I have dedicated the story of this chase to Judge Samuel Atkinson, of the supreme court of Georgia. I do this because the judge loves hounds and hunting. The judge will not object to this because the race was pulled off by the type of hounds he especially admires. This type comes down from a strain developed and perpetuated by men whose names will live for all time not only in Meriwether county, but also throughout Georgia and the entire Southland. I refer to Major McCaslin, Captain "Boss" Woodward, Colonel Jim Sutton, J. A. McKnight, "Fox Hunting" Henry Harris, and Charles A. Davis. These men were noted for their gentlemanly qualities at all times and on all occasions. They were cautious that their hounds should carry blood lines of their liking. They loved to tell that the hounds they owned came down from "Old Jeff Davis," Longstreet and the Birdsong strain. The hounds in this hunt have that same dash, speed, stamina and fox sense usually found in their noted ancestors. The race occurred recently where there is a wonderfully good running red fox well trained in the art of outwitting the hounds pursuing him. It is an enjoyment to observe his wits against the skill of the hounds. This particular fox had been chased so often that it was hard for the hounds to find him quickly. HOUNDS SCATTER On the hunt, which was at night, the hounds were scattered over a wide area, each trying to search the fox out. Finally one hound found him out and gave voice. He was soon joined by one, then another, until five were on the scent. In about 10 minutes they had him up and going. The going was fast. They ran east for one and a half miles, thence north for about a mile, passing through a little village along its main street, waking up many folks. Some of the villagers ran out into their yards and some on the porches to hear this grandest of all music, the voices of the hounds. The next day we hurried back for another chase. We were up the road west of the village and could hear excited voices commenting on the race. The fox was being so closely pressed that he had to leave the road, but came near the spot where we were waiting. He dodged around a small clump of timber and swung off to the south, making it back to his homeland, a 300-acre pasture. Here the part of the pack that had been making a search for him joined in with the original five. These five had been running him for 40 minutes. These fresh hounds added new life to the race. The fox now tried one of his famous tricks. He ran a circle several hundred yards around for five distinct trips, the purpose of which was to fill up the place with his scent so that he could spring off to one side and cause the hounds to make possibly one or two extra rounds while he was making his getaway. As it happened, one hound was running on the flank of the pack and found where he had make his spring out to get the lead he had planned. This surprised him. This flank running hound was so excited that he had no difficulty in swinging the pack in on the line of scent. There was nothing to do but for the fox to make a run for it. He pulled into a timbered section and went straight away, going southwest and on out of hearing. After 40 minutes he came back from a southeasterly direction and into the pasture again. This time he made several circles, hoping by doing so to get some advantage; however, the hounds were determined. They played with him. The notes ringing out from them then indicated "caught fox." His former experiences made him realize this. There was only one alternative, and that was for him to make for his burrow. This he did but barely so. This was a three-hour race and a fast one all the time. GREAT RUNNER. I have had the hounds after him in the daylight. They hole him in about half the time it takes at night. They have put him in places where he could easily have been gotten out, but never will I do this. He is such a fine runner and really seems to enjoy having the hounds chase him. Then, too, he appears to be glad to entertain folks because he often runs up close enough for you to see him. He is an unusually large fox, as big as an ordinary dog. Foxhunters know that the same class and type of race is not had every time a hunt is tried out. However, this was a race which you can rehearse over and over again. Here is hoping that all of my hunting friends have an occasional chase like this. The following is from a 7 Jun 1997 letter from Mrs. Wayne (Rosalind Johnson) Edmondson: I would like to mention about Uncle Homer Culpepper, Margaret and Eleanor's father; he was he closest thing to a grandfather that my sister, brother and I had since both my grandfathers died long before I came along. We lived in the George Green Culpepper house from 1946 until 1954 which was across the road from Uncle Homer and Aunt Dora. There was a long sandy walk way in front of their house and as children we would play in the sand looking for doodle bugs and such. Uncle Homer sat on the porch with his f ly swatter, killing flies and singing ditties and telling stories to us as we played. He was an avid fox hunter and had quite a reputation of raising fox hounds. One of my fondest memories that I am sure very few people of my age ever experienced was getting to go on one of the fox hunts one night. Uncle Homer had a farm with an old vacant farm house that had a working fireplace and had some hay stored in it. Mother built a fire in the fi replace and we bedded down on the hay pile while the men built a fire outside. We roasted hot dogs and marshmallows and drank Cokes and told ghost stories. Once the dogs were turned loose and began the chase, the men stood around the fire calling out the dogs names as they heard them running the fox. I'm sure it wouldn't sound so exciting to the kids today, but to an 8 year old in 1949 before TV and such, it was plenty exciting.
      Homer Culpepper suffered from prostate cancer. The following obituary is from an unknown source, possibly the Meriwether Vindicator Homer Culpepper, Lone Oak, Dies; Funeral Thursday HOGANSVILLE, June 6 -- Homer L. Culpepper, 79 member of a prominent Meriwether County family died at 6 p. m. yesterday at his home in Lone Oak following an illness of four weeks. Funeral services will be held at 3 p. m. tomorrow from the Allen- Lee Memorial Methodist Church in Lone Oak. The Rev. J. H. Couch, pastor of the First Methodist Church of Hampton, will officiate. Burial will be in the churchyard at Lone Oak. Pallbearers will be Warren Johnson, Pitts Culpepper, W. C. Culpepper, Jr., D. B. Murphy, Herbin Turner, Robert F. Herring, A. D. Herring and E. L. Prickett. The body will lie in state at the chapel of the Claude A. McKibben Funeral Home here until Thursday morning when it will be conveyed to the church at Lone Oak Mr. Culpepper is survived by his wife Mrs. Theodora Herring Culpepper of Lone Oak; two daughters, Mrs. A. M. Willingham and Miss Margaret Culpepper, both of Lone Oak; three brothers, Col. Nathan F. Culpepper of Greenville, J. W. Culpepper of Fayetteville and T.J. Culpepper of Atlanta; and a sister, Mrs. D. O. Phillips of College Park. Mr. Culpepper served as tax commissioner of Meriwether County for 28 years, retiring two years ago. Before holding this post, he was a well-known and beloved school teacher of Troup, Coweta and Meriwether counties, having also taught in Hogansville. His unselfishness and his interest in people and his ability to help others influence many lives in this section of Georgia. He was prominently identified with the social and civic life of Greenville, Lone Oak and of Meriwether County, Mr. Culpepper was the son of the late Ellen Nall Culpepper and Simeon F. Culpepper, pioneer settlers of Meriwether County. His father was clerk of the courts in Meriwether County for 25 years and also served as tax commissioner for that county for many years. Mr. Culpepper was born at Lone Oak and had spent most of his life there. He attended the State Normal College at Athens and Peabody College at Nashville, Tenn. He was preceded in death only eight weeks by his brother Edgar Culpepper. He was a Mason and a member of the Allen-Lee Memorial Methodist Church. Claude A. McKibben Funeral Home of Hogansville is in charge of arrangements.
      Another obituary appeared on Friday, June 15, 1951, in an unknown source: MR. H. L. CULPEPPER BELOVED MERIWETHER CITIZEN DIES AT HIS HOME Mr. H. L. Culpepper, 79, member of one of Meriwether County's prominent families died Tuesday afternoon at his home in Lone Oak. Funeral services were held at Lee Memorial Methodist Church at Lone Oak. Rev. J. H. Couch of Hampton conducted the sad final rites. Interment was in the church yard. The esteem and love of countless friends was evidenced by the numerous floral offerings.
Claude A. McKibben Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements. Mr. Culpepper retired from his official duties two year ago. Earlier in his career, Mr. Culpepper was a beloved teacher of Troup, Coweta and Meriwether county. Mr. Culpepper was prominently identified with the social and civic live of Greenville, Lone Oak and of Meriwether county. The deceased was the son of the late Ellen Nall Culpepper and Simeon F. Culpepper pioneer citizens. His father was clerk of the courts in Meriwether county for 25 years and was Tax Commissioner for many years. Mrs. Culpepper was born at Lone Oak, Nov. 3, 1871. He attended the State Normal College and Peabody College in Nashville, Tenn. Mr. Culpepper had been ill for four weeks, and was preceded in death by his brother only a few weeks ago. He was a Mason and a member of the Allen-Lee Memorial Methodist Church. Pallbearers were Warren Johnson, Pitts Culpepper, W. C. Culpepper, Jr., D. B. Murphy, Herbin Turner, Robert F. Herring, A. D. Herring, E. L. Prickett. Mr. Culpepper is survived by his wife, Mrs. Theodora Herring Culpepper, two daughters, Mrs. A. M. Willingham, and Miss Margaret Culpepper all of Lone Oak, three brothers, Col. N. F. Culpepper, Greenville, J. W. Culpepper, Fayetteville, T. J. Culpepper, Atlanta, a sister. Mrs. D. O. Phillips, of College Park. For 28 years Mr. Culpepper served as the efficient Tax Commissioner of Meriwether County. Col. W. S. Allen, of Greenville, paid a tribute to Mr. Culpepper during the service and said in part: "I have known him in his official capacity as Tax Commissioner of our county during the Republican Administrations from 1921 to 1933. Trying years when our homes and lands were under mortgage, and our growing crops under lien. He stood as a rock in a weary land, between the taxing authorities and the people; and without regard to his own security or the security of his family he patiently and silently took the blame and criticism for uncollected taxes. His faith in people and his courage literally saved thousands of homes and farms in Meriwether County, and to this hour, his name is a benediction around the hearth stones in the homes of our people."
      The following appears to be a fuller version of the tribute given by Col. W. S. Allen on June 7, 1951. It was attributed to "Jack" Allen and was printed in an unknown source: TRIBUTE TO HON. CULPEPPER During a long and somewhat stormy life, I have been honored and blessed with the friendship of many loyal friends. Here lies one of the noblest of them all--Homer L. Culpepper. I have known him in his official capacity as Tax Commissioner of our County during the Republican Administrations from 1921 to 1933. Trying years when our homes and lands were under mortgage, and our growing crops under lien. He stood as a rock in a weary land, between the taxing authorities and the people, and without regard to his own security or the security of his family he patiently and silently took the blame and criticism for uncollected taxes. His faith in people and his courage literally saved thousands of homes and farms in Meriwether County, and to this hour, his name is a benediction around the hearth stone in the homes of our people. I have known him, best of all, as a faithful and loyal friend who never offered excuses or alibis, who never asked for a vacation or furlough, who gave his all to his friends without question, without stint, without omit, and with no thought of possible reward. Yes, I have known him, admired him, and loved him all these years, for all of these things, and I shall miss him and mourn him as long as my own life shall last, and I shall never again visit this little community, but what I shall find, myself longing for the touch of that vanished hand, and the sound of a voice that is still. Today we shall lay his body in the bosom of the soil he loved so well for its long rest, but we know that his Spirit has already taken up its residence in his Father's house, in that land where we never grow old. To me, Mr. Homer's love of nature and of his home are expressed in this old, old poem: When the grilling day is over and the sun is going down; when the shades of night are falling on the country and the town; when the whippoorwill is calling and the fox begins to roam; when the mocking bird is dozing--then I want to be at home. When the storm cloud's in the offing and the mighty thunders roll; when the lightening cleaves the heavens and the squirrel hunts his hole; when a sickening, inky blackness shades the azure dome; when the storm breaks in its fury--then I want to be at home. When the pink rosebuds are swinging so gently in the breeze and the glorious sun is shining on the warblers in the trees; when the air is perfume-laden and the summer days have come; when all nature seems ablooming--then I want to be at home. When the winter snows are drifting in the icy, cutting gale; when the winter wind is moaning a lonesome forlorn wail; with icicles on the barn roof like teeth in a mammoth comb; when the sparrows beg their breakfast then I want to be at home. When life is nearly over, when I cross(?) the great divide, listening to the ____ calling me from the other side; when the last great call is sounded and my final day has come there's one prayer that I would offer--then I want to be at home.
      From The Atlanta Journal: H. L. Culpepper Civic Leader, Dies in Lone Oak Special to The Atlanta Journal HOGANSVILLE, Ga., June 6--Homer L. Culpepper, 79, who served 28 years as tax collector of Meriwether County, died Tuesday night at his home in Lone Oak. Funeral services will be held Thursday at 3 o'clock at the Allen Lee Memorial Church in Lone Oak. Burial will be in the churchyard. The body will remain at the Claude McKibben Funeral Home until Thursday morning. Mr. Culpepper, until his retirement two years ago, was active in the civic affairs of Greenville, Lone Oak, Hogansville and Meriwether County. Before taking county office, he was a school teacher, including some years here. He was the son of Ellen Noll [read Nall] Culpepper and Simeon Culpepper, who was tax collector for Meriwether County for 25 years. Survivors include his wife, the former Theodora Herring Culpepper, Lone Oak; two daughters, Mrs. Ann [read A. M.] Willingham and Miss Margaret Culpepper, Lone Oak; three brothers, N. F., Greenville, J. W., Fayetteville, and T. J., Atlanta; sister Mrs. D. O. Phillips, College Park. 

Family

Esther Theodora Herring (2 Apr 1872 - 3 Jun 1959)
Marriage*26 Jun 1902 He married Esther Theodora Herring at Georgia on 26 Jun 1902 at age 30. 
Children
ChartsJohn Culpepper of Randolph Co, AL: Descendant Chart
Last Edited31 Jul 2006

Citations

  1. Priscilla Turner, compiler, Meriwether Co., GA Cemeteries, Spartanburg, SC: , 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Book: 975.8455 V39.
    Allen-Lee Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, near Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    + Homer Lee Culpepper, 3 Nov 1871 – 5 Jun 1951.
  2. 1880 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 81, Page 203C (34), Family 263, Luthersville, Meriwether Co., GA
    Sim Culpepper, Self, M, Md, 37, Farming, GA/SC/GA
    Ellen Culpepper, Wife, F, Md, 35, Keeping House, GA/GA/GA
    Nat Culpepper, Son, M, S, 12, Working On Farm, GA/GA/GA
    Wesley Culpepper, Son, M, S, 10, Working On Farm, GA/GA/GA
    Homer Culpepper, Son, M, S, 8, Working On Farm, GA/GA/GA
    Edgar Culpepper, Son, M, S, 6, --- , GA/GA/GA
    Wilber Culpepper, Son, M, S, 3, --- , GA/GA/GA
    Mary Lou Culpepper, Dau, F, S, 1, --- , GA/GA/GA.
  3. Correspondence from Eleanor Herring Culpepper (Mrs. Albert Marvin Willingham), Grantville, GA, to Lew Griffin, 1976-2004.
  4. 1900 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 43, Page 163B (14), Family 289, Greenville, Meriwether Co., GA
    Homer L. Culpepper, Head, M, Nov 1871, 28, Sng, GA/GA/GA, School Teacher.
  5. 1910 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 89, Page 1B, Lines 71-76, Greenville Rd, Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    Homer L. Culpepper, Head, M, 39, md1-7 yrs, GA/GA/GA, Life Insurance Agent
    E. Theodora Culpepper, Wife, F, 38, md1-7 yrs, ch 2/2, GA/GA/GA
    Margaret L. Culpepper, Daughter, F, 3, Sng, GA/GA/GA
    Eleanor Culpepper, Daughter, F, 1 6/12, Sng, GA/GA/GA.
  6. 1920 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 93, Page 2A, Lines 22-26, Luthersville Rd, Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    Homer L. Culpepper, Head, M, 49, md, GA/GA/GA
    Dora H. Culpepper, Wife, F, 46, md, GA/GA/GA
    Margaret Culpepper, Daughter, F, 14, Sng, GA/GA/GA
    Eleanor Culpepper, Daughter, F, 12, Sng, GA/GA/GA
    J. Stoks Herring, Father-in-law, M, 88, wd, GA/GA/GA.
  7. Georgia Health Department / Office of Vital Records, compiler, Georgia Deaths, 1919-1998, Online database at Ancestry.com, 1998.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/inddbs/5426a.htm
    Mrs. S. F. Culpepper, d. 19 Jan 1929 in Meriwether Co., GA.
  8. Priscilla Turner, compiler, Meriwether Co., GA Cemeteries, Spartanburg, SC: , 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Book: 975.8455 V39.
    Allen-Lee Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, near Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    + Ellen Clay Nall Culpepper, 5 May 1844 – 19 Jan 1929.
  9. Georgia Health Department / Office of Vital Records, compiler, Georgia Deaths, 1919-1998, Online database at Ancestry.com, 1998.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/inddbs/5426a.htm
    S. F. Culpepper, d. 22 Jun 1929 in Meriwether Co., GA.
  10. Priscilla Turner, compiler, Meriwether Co., GA Cemeteries, Spartanburg, SC: , 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Book: 975.8455 V39.
    Allen-Lee Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, near Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    + Simeon Fletcher Culpepper, 11 Oct 1840 (sic) – 22 Jun 1929, Sgt., Co. D, 8th GA Inf.
  11. 1930 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 24, Page 1B, Niceville Road, Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    Owns Home, Radio=N, Farm=Y
    Homer L. Culpepper, Head, M, 59, M, md @ 25, GA/GA/GA, Tax Collector
    Theodora Culpepper, Wife, F, 57, M, md @ 23, GA/GA/GA
    Margaret Culpepper, Dau, F, 23, S, GA/GA/GA, Public School Teacher
    Eleanor Culpepper, Dau, F, 22, S, GA/GA/GA, Public School Teacher.
  12. Georgia Health Department / Office of Vital Records, compiler, Georgia Deaths, 1919-1998, Online database at Ancestry.com, 1998.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/inddbs/5426a.htm
    Homer L. Culpepper, d. 5 Jun 1951 at 79 years in Meriwether Co., GA; Res. in Meriwether Co., GA.