Simeon Fletcher Culpepper

Male, #32440, (11 Oct 1842 - 22 Jun 1929)
Father*George Washington Culpepper of Meriwether Co., GA (6 Dec 1808 - 20 Dec 1901)
Mother*Perlina Perdue (27 Jun 1812 - 21 Jul 1882)
DNA* Simeon has been proven by DNA and genealogical research to be a descendant of Joseph Culpepper of Edgecombe Co., NC, who is a son of Robert Culpepper of Lower Norfolk, the son of Henry Culpepper of Lower Norfolk, VA. 
Birth*11 Oct 1842 Simeon was born at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia, on 11 Oct 1842. 
1850 Census1 Jun 1850 Perlina, Permelia, Thomas, Sarah, Simeon, Nancy, Noah, William, John and James listed as a household member living with George Washington Culpepper of Meriwether Co., GA on the 1850 Census on 1 Jun 1850 at Meriwether Co., Georgia.1 
1860 Census1 Jun 1860 Perlina, James, John, Simeon, Sarah, Thomas, Permelia, George and Fereba listed as a household member living with George Washington Culpepper of Meriwether Co., GA in the 1860 Census at Meriwether Co., Georgia.2 
Civil War*between 1861 and 1865 He served in the War Between the States between 1861 and 1865

     Simeon Fletcher Culpepper, Meriwether Co, GA, Enlisted on 18 May 1861 as a Private and mustered into Co. D, GA 8th Infantry, Promotions: 5th Sergeant. Wounded 2 Jul 1863 Gettysburg, PA. He was Surrendered on 9 Apr 1865 at Appomattox Court House, VA.
=============================
February 22nd, 1940
Re: McCrary Family History, Rufus C. McCrary – War Record
From: R. E. McCrary, Alvaton, Georgia
To: Joseph Boyd McCrary, Atlanta, Georgia

I will try as best as I can to give a brief history of my father, Rufus Coggins McCrary, Civil War Record. He was in Company D, the first Company organized in Meriwether County.
     This Company was made up of young men from some of the best families in Meriwether County. I will mention a few that I remember hearing my father talk about: Alonzo Freeman, Gus Brantley, Clem Allen (Who was shot through the head just back of his eyes, the bullet entering one temple and passing out through the other. My father saw him fall and he was reported killed, but he showed up later and lived many years after the war-but was totally blind.), S. F. Culpepper, Joe McKnight (Who was killed in the battle of the Wilderness and his body was never found after the battle.), John P. Atkinson (Who was killed at the First Battle of Manassas.), J. M. Herndon, Dave Ellison, R. C. McCrary (my father) and others I cannot remember.
     R. C. McCrary in Company with these, boarded the train at Grantville, Georgia on May 18th , 1861 for Virginia, the site of the War. Arriving at Richmond, they proceeded at once to General Francis S. Bartow’s Camp at Howard Grove. There they were mustered into service about the 24th of May.
     The Regiment was known as the Eight Georgia Regiment and was composed of Company D from Meriwether, Company C from Pulaksi County, Companies A, E, and H from Floyd, Company B from Chatham, Company C from Bibb, Company F from Fulton, Company I from Greene and Company K from Oglethorpe.
     The Brigade was known as Anderson Brigade and was commanded by General G. T. (Tige) Anderson. The Brigade was composed of the 7th, 8th, 9th, and 11th Georgia Volunteer Regiments and the 1st Georgia Regular and Tylander Battallion from Americus, Georgia and the last two years of the War the 59th Georgia Regiment. They were in Hood’s Division which was composed of Hood’s Division which was composed of Hood’s Texas, Anderson’s Georgia, Benning’s Georgia, and Law’s Alabama Brigades Longstreet’s Corps.
     As soon as the Regiment was organized they were sent to Harper’s Ferry about June 1, 1861. After a few days they were sent to Winchester, Virginia, and on July 19th, 1861 they were ordered to Manassas, and on July 21st took part in the First Battle of Manassas. In this battle the Regiment lost heavily. After many hours of fighting the regiment was relieved, and on retiring from the battlefield, leaving most of their either wounded or dead, they were met by General Beauregard, who was in command of the Southern army, and when he saw them he raised his hat and said,“I salute the Eighth Georgia with my hat off, history will not forget you.” They camped and maneuvered near Manassas and in front of Washington City until winter. They spent the winter of 1861 near Summerville, Virginia, and about March 1, 1862 they were sent down on the Peninsular near Old Yorktown.
     On arrival at Yorktown the Brigade was ordered to retake a portion of the line just captured by the enemy. They did this in short order without losing many men. They were attacked by the enemy several times during the days they were in line, but repulsed the enemy every time without much loss. They were in several engagements during the seven days battle around Richmond June 24-30, 1862. They were in the Second Battle of Manassas August 29 and 30, 1862. They were then ordered to Maryland where they fought in the Battles of Boonesboro, and the Battle of Sharpsburg. They were then marched back to Virginia where they had a short rest near Winchester, Virginia, after which they went to Fredericksburg, where they fought in the Battle of Fredericksburg December 13, 1862. They spent the winter of 1862 near Fredericksburg. About the first of April 1862 they were sent to the front near Suffolk, Virginia where they were engaged in severe skirmishes, with slight loss. They rejoined the main army just before the Pennsylvania Campagin and where in the Battle of Gettysburg, July 1-3, 1863. They Eighth Georgia Regiment lost more men in this battle than any Regiment in Lee’s army. When they came out of the fight there were only two men in my Father’s Company who were not killed or wounded, the two being my father, R. C. McCrary and Dave Ellison. Some of the men were only slightly wounded and were soon back in rank.
     They were sent back to Virginia until about October 1, 1863, then they were ordered to Tennessee to General Bragg’s relief. From Tennessee they were sent to Charleston to James Island, where they rested one month. They were then sent to Knoxville, Tennessee November 1st where they lost heavily in an effort to capture Fort London in that city. They spent the winter of 1863-64 in Tennessee and suffered much, since all communication and supplies were shut off. They went back to Virginia just in time to get in the Battle of the Wilderness, May 6, 1864. They Eighth Georgia Regiment lost heavily in this engagement, and engagements until they reached the front at Richmond. They were in the Battles of Fort Harrison in September, Barbytown Road and Deep Bottom in October 1864, and spent the winter of 1864-65 in front of Richmond. They left Richmond for Petersburg April 1, 1865 from there to Appomattox where they surrendered April 9, 1865. My father came home only one time during the four years he was in the army, and did not get wounded a single time.
     There has never been any better soldiers than the men that composed the army of Northern Virginia, commanded by General Robert E. Lee and I am sure there were no better soldiers in Lee’s army than my father, R. C. McCrary, and these other noble men from Meriwether County, in Company D of the famous Eighth Georgia Regiment.
     R. E. McCrary
     Alvaton, Georgia

**In paragraph 5 where Hood’s Division is mentioned, there appears to be a typo (along with some other words in this letter, ie., ‘They Eighth Georgia Regiment’), I have re-typed this letter exactly as Cousin R. E. McCrary wrote it to my Uncle Joseph Boyd McCrary (G3Uncle) as to preserve its history in my family so please excuse the typos** Helena-Suzanne Shreve.3 
Marriage*4 Dec 1866 He married Ellen Clay Nall at Georgia on 4 Dec 1866 at age 24.4 
Birth of Son16 Sep 1867 His son Nathan Florence Culpepper was born on 16 Sep 1867 at Meriwether Co., Georgia.5 
Birth of Son12 Aug 1869 His son James Wesley Culpepper was born on 12 Aug 1869 at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia
1870 Census*1 Jun 1870 Simeon was listed as the head of a family on the 1870 Census at Meriwether Co., Georgia.6 
Birth of Son3 Nov 1871 His son Homer Lee Culpepper was born on 3 Nov 1871 at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia.7 
Birth of Son7 Mar 1874 His son Edgar Clarence Culpepper was born on 7 Mar 1874 at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia.8 
Birth of Son2 Aug 1876 His son Wilbur Clay Culpepper was born on 2 Aug 1876 at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia.9 
1880 Census*1 Jun 1880 Simeon was listed as the head of a family on the 1880 Census at Meriwether Co., Georgia.10 
Birth of Son18 Mar 1881 His son Thomas Jefferson Culpepper was born on 18 Mar 1881 at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia.11 
Death of Mother21 Jul 1882 His mother Perlina Perdue died on 21 Jul 1882 at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia.12 
Photographedsay 1885 He was photographed say 1885 at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia.13
Simeon Fletcher Culpepper
1900 Census*1 Jun 1900 Simeon was listed as the head of a family on the 1900 Census at Greenville, Meriwether Co., Georgia.14 
Military pension* He applied for a military pension at Meriwether Co., Georgia.15 
Death of Father20 Dec 1901 His father George Washington Culpepper of Meriwether Co., GA died on 20 Dec 1901 at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia.16 
Photographedsay 1910 He was photographed say 1910 at Meriwether Co., Georgia.13
Simeon F. Culpepper Clerk of the Superior Court
1910 Census*15 Apr 1910 Simeon was listed as the head of a family on the 1910 Census at Greenville, Meriwether Co., Georgia.17 
Photographedsay 1915 He was photographed say 1915 at Meriwether Co., Georgia.13
Simeon Fletcher Culpepper & John W. Taylor
Photographed*say 1920 He was photographed say 1920 at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia.13
Simeon Fletcher Culpepper
1920 Census*1 Jan 1920 Simeon was listed as the head of a family on the 1920 Census at Greenville, Meriwether Co., Georgia.18 
Death of Spouse19 Jan 1929 His wife Ellen Clay Nall died on 19 Jan 1929 at Greenville, Meriwether Co., Georgia.19,20 
Death*22 Jun 1929 He died at Greenville, Meriwether Co., Georgia, on 22 Jun 1929 at age 86.21,22 
Burial*23 Jun 1929 His body was interred on 23 Jun 1929 at Allen-Lee Cemetery, Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia.22 
Biography* George W. Culpepper recorded his son's birth in his Bible: "Simeon Fletcher was born on Tuesday Morning 9 o'clock October 11th 1842." George W. Culpepper was noted in the 1840 census of Meriwether Co., GA and this is where Simeon F. Culpepper is presumed to have been born. According to the Bible record, "Simeon Fletcher was Baptised on the 7th of June 1844." S. F. Culpepper emerges census records as a 7 year old living with his parents in 1850 Meriwether Co., GA and as a 17 year old living at home in the 1860 Lutherville P. O. district (now Luthersville?), Meriwether Co., GA.
      When the Civil War began, Simeon F. Culpepper joined the Confederate Army. A son, Thomas J. Culpepper, at a 3 Aug 1969 Simeon F. Culpepper family dinner, told of Simeon's Civil War service: When Pappa was a little over 18 years old the Civil War started. The first shot was fired April 12, 1861 at Fort Sumpter South Carolona, about 3 weeks later, May 1, 1861, he volunteered for service in the Confederate Army and was enlisted in the 18th Georgia Regiment Company D. This regiment became a part of General Robert E. Lee's army in Virginia.
      The following was written by a granddaughter of Simeon F. Culpepper and appeared in Meriwether Vindicator on 6 Oct 1933: MY U. D. C. ANCESTOR SIMEON FLETCHER CULPEPPER (By Louise C[ulpepper] Murphy) My grandfather, Simon Fletcher Culpepper, on whose record I entered the United Daughters of the Confederacy, was born in Meriwether County, Georgia, October 11, 1842, the son of George Washington and Perlina Perdue Culpepper. He was the seventh of eleven children, seven boys and four girls. All of his brothers except the youngest, who was only nine years old at the beginning of hostilities, served in the Confederate Army. The youngest of the six, Thomas Joel, entered the service during the closing months of the war, at the age of sixteen. The others served throughout the entire war. Two of them were killed in action. Simon Fletcher Culpepper enlisted in April, 1861, in Company D, 8th Georgia Regiment, Confederate States Army. Company D was organized in Meriwether County by Captain Howard, its first commanding officer, who lived in Greenville. The recruits Were given a month's training at Warm Springs Camp Ground by Captain Howard, and in May were marched to Grantville, Georgia, where they were entrained for the front. The company was transported over the historic Western and Atlantic Railroad, by way of Chattanooga, to Virginia, and there joined the 8th Georgia Regiment. The Meriwether contingent received an early baptism of fire as the 8th Georgia was thrown into action at the very beginning of hostilities, joining in the First Battle of Manassas early on the morning of Sunday, July 21, 1861, with orders to capture a Yankee battery entrenched on a hillside and protected by a patch of woods. The gallant and devout Captain Howard led his men in prayer before entering the fight, and fell, mortally wounded, almost at Grandfather's feet, at the first volley. Company D was shot to pieces, nearly all of its officers killed, and retired in disorder. As soon as they were beyond the range of the enemy rifles, these raw recruits, less than three months from the rollicksome, carefree days of the Old South, rallied, held an election for officers in the field, and promptly returned to the fray. The company was again shot to pieces, and again lost most of its officers; again retired, elected new officers, and returned to the fight. The Eighth Georgia was forced to retreat before attaining its objective, and was relieved by the Seventh Georgia, in which Grandfather's brother, Uncle Noah was serving. Grandfather related an interesting event in connection with the relief of his regiment. He stated that as the Eighth Georgia; retired, it was met by the men of the Seventh (commanded by a Colonel whose name, for obvious reasons, is not stated), and that this officer, witnessing the condition of the men of the Eighth Georgia and noting, that most of the officers of the Eighth had been killed, quailed before the murderous fire from the entrenched Federal Battery, and took refuge behind a farm house, refusing to lead his men into battle. The gallant Colonel Francis Bartow, who commanded the Eighth Georgia, discovered his fellow officer in this position of safety, holding his men beyond the range of enemy guns, and charged him with cowardice. But words passed between the two men, and the color bearer of the Seventh Georgia was shot down almost in their presence. Whereupon Bartow grasped the colors of the Seventh Georgia, declared that if the commander of that regiment would not lead it into battle he would, called upon the men of the Seventh to follow him and dashed into the thickest of the fighting. Bartow was killed as he led another colonel's regiment into battle. After Bartow's death, the Colonel of the Seventh Georgia again assumed command of the regiment. Grandfather stated that he was an eye-witness to this incident. Simeon Fletcher Culpepper was promoted from Private to First Sergeant, and held that rank until the end of the War. His military record is in the history of the Army of Northern Virginia. He participated in all of the Virginia campaigns of Lee's forces, and took part in the invasion of Pennsylvania. He was grievously wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg, on July 3, 1863, as Longstreet's Division, to which 8th Georgia was attached, was sent to the reinforcement of Pickett and his gallant men. The bullet passed entirely through both thighs, leaving scars which he bore to his grave. His brother, Lieutenant John Wesley Culpepper, and some of his comrades removed him from the Battlefield to an old roadway behind the Confederate lines. When Lee retreated from the field at Gettysburg, he was forced to abandon his wounded men, and they were promptly made prisoners of war. R. H. Cousins, A. H. Freeman, W. M. McLendon, and R. D. Adair, Meriwether County boys, all of Company D, were also wounded in this battle, and were left behind in the same roadway with Grandfather. They were placed in the prison hospital maintained by the Yankees at Gettysburg and remained there until exchanged. McLendon and Adair, both of whom were also wounded in the legs, were operated upon by the Federal surgeons, each of them losing a limb. The others were exchanged as soon as they recovered. Grandfather related that the prisoners were encamped in a wheat field and held under guard. He said that Mr. Cousins, whose wound was not severe was soon able to walk about, and constructed a wick-i-up of fence rails, which he covered with wheat cut from the field. The wounded prisoners crawled into this shelter when it rained. Otherwise, they were without covering. Grandfather returned home as soon as he was exchanged, to give his wounds a chance to heal, and returned to his regiment as soon as he was able to march. He was yet unable to carry his gun on long marches, and it was conveyed for him in the wagon train. He related that on one occasion when the company was on the march it was surprised by a company of Yankee soldiers who were in ambush near the road. The men fell back in disorder, and as they did so, General Lee, on his famous war-horse Traveller, spurred to the head of the column and commanded the soldiers to follow him. Two men from the 8th Georgia stepped to the side of General Lee's horse and told him that they were prepared to obey any command he gave, but that they would not follow him into battle. These men led General Lee's horse over a hill, beyond the range of the enemy guns and returned to the right. Grandfather stated that he witnessed this incident. Whether it was the same occasion as that on which John B. Gordon, "the man of the 12th of May" turned Lee's horse to the rear, is not known. When he returned to the army, S. F. Culpepper took part in all of the fighting around Richmond and Petersburg. His brother, Lieutenant John Wesley Culpepper, was killed in battle near Richmond on August 16, 1864. Grandfather's diary, which he kept during most of the war, contains this entry: "Lt. J. W. Culpepper, Co. D 8th Regiment, Georgia Volunteers, was killed in battle August 16, 1864. Was buried about thirty steps N. E. of Mr. William Martin's garden on night of the same day, the distance from Richmond being nine miles on the Darbytown Road. I am left all alone. S. F. Culpepper. This Aug. 16, 1864" Just a few days before his death, Lieutenant Culpepper told Grandfather that he expected to be killed, and that he wanted Grandfather to have his watch. Grandfather carried this watch until his death. The surviving members of Company D, 8th Georgia Regiment, surrendered with the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Court House, Virginia. With a few of his comrades, Grandfather marched through Virginia and the Carolinas to Augusta, where they were able to get a train to Atlanta. On this march they were forced to live off of the country, and frequently went hungary. Grandfather related that on one occasion, when meals had been unusually scarce, they suddenly came upon a drove of hogs. Surrounding the animals, although having no weapons, they managed to knock a shoat down with stones. He described the difficulties encountered in cleaning the hog, how they finally managed to skin it, and the delightful feast of unsalted pork which followed. Simeon F. Culpepper returned to his father's home in Meriwether County, and the following year taught school at Shiloh Valley in Harris County. He was married in the fall of 1866 to Ellen Clay Nall. To this union were born eight children, six boys and two girls. He farmed and taught school in various localities in Meriwether County. He was elected Tax Collector of Meriwether County in 1887 or 1888, and served two years. He was later elected Clerk of the Superior Court, and served in that capacity for twenty-three years. He died on June 22, 1929, at his home in Greenville Georgia.
      After the war, Simeon F. Culpepper returned home. George Washington Culpepper recorded his son's marriage in his Bible: "Simeon F. Culpepper and Ellen C. Nall was Married Dec 4, 1866."
      In the 1870 census, Simeon was noted in the Lutherville P.O. District, (now Luthersville?), Meriwether Co., GA, as a school teacher with real estate valued at $1,000 and personal property valued at $450. He was was recorded with his wife and children in the 1880 census of Meriwether Co., GA. Mrs. Eleanor Culpepper Willingham wrote in a 13 Jul 1984 letter that "Our g-father, Simeon, taught at Sasserville Academy in Gay in 1887." Simeon and Ellen were were noted with their children in the 1900 census of Meriwether Co., GA and in the 1910 census of Greenville, Meriwether Co., GA.
      14 Feb 1929, just a few months before his death, Simeon F. Culpepper attended a birthday dinner given for a friend, James W. Estes, and according to an unknown local paper gave the following blessing before the dinner: Heavenly Father we thank Thee for being able to assemble to celebrate the anniversary of our brother and Comrade. We thank thee for spreading thy glory over him as a shadow of protection, permitting him to live to celebrate this day. May he live to see many more such days in life. Direct the minds and hearts of his children and grand-children to follow in his footsteps, doing good in the world and spreading sunshine among all the people where ever they go. Sanctify these table comforts to the good of all of which we ask for Christ sake, Amen.
      The following death notice is from an unknown source dated 26 Jun 1929: RITES ARE PRONOUNCED FOR SOLDIER OF LEE Simon F. Culpepper, Greenville, 87 Years Old at Time of Death. Greenville, Ga., June 23--(Special)--Last rites for Simeon F. Culpepper, soldier under Lee and for 23 years clerk of the superior court of Meriwether county, were said here at Old Prospect church. Burial was in the churchyard [now the Allen-Lee Memorial Church] and services were conducted by Rev. J. T. Robins, of Thomaston, assisted by Rev. A. L. Hale, of Greenville. Born 87 years ago in Meriwether county, Mr. Culpepper was a resident of the county all his life. He was tax collector of the county for two years [1887-1889] and then was elected to the post of clerk of the superior court, a position he filled for 23 years. For four years a member of the Seventy Georgia Regiment in Lee's army of northern Virginia, Mr. Culpepper saw service in every battle in which his unit participated from First Manassas to Appomatox. He was wounded twice. He was commander of the Meriwether camp of Confederate veterans at the time of his death. He leaves six sons and two daughters. N. F. Culpepper, W. C. Culpepper, T. J. Culpepper, Miss Mary Lou Culpepper and Mrs. D. O. Phillips, all of Greenville; J. W. Culpepper, all of Fayetteville; H. D. [read L.] Culpepper and E. C. Culpepper, of Lone Oak.
      The following is another funeral notice from an unknown source: FORMER LONE OAK RESIDENT, PASSES Veteran Public Officer and Confederate Veteran Buried at Lone Oak (Special Lone Oak Correspondence) Mr. S. F. Culpepper, a former citizen of Lone Oak but of later years a resident of Greenville, passed away at his home on Saturday afternoon, May 22 [read June 22], after long weakness from the infirmities of age, due also to the loss of his devoted wife who five months ago preceeded. Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at Prospect church, where he worshipped as a boy. Rev. Dr. Robins, of Thomaston, officiated, assisted by Rev. Green, and Rev. A. L. Hale, and his body was laid to rest among many of his loved ones gone before. Mr. Culpepper was born in Meriwether county eighty-seven years ago and had resided in this county during his entire life time. He married Miss Ellen Nall who died last January, their married life having continued for sixty-two years. He was a Confederate veteran, having served under General Lee in his army of Northern Virginia for four years in the Seventh Georgia Regiment and participated in all of the battles engaged in by this army from First Manassas to Appomatox. He was twice wounded in battle, a minnie ball having passed through both thighs at Gettysburg. He filled the office of tax collector of Meriwether county for two years. Subsequently, he was elected clerk of the Superior Court of the county in which capacity he served for twenty-three years. He was the last member of his family of six brothers and three sisters, his last surviving brother, Captain N. S. Culpepper of Atlanta, having died about two months ago. He is survived by six sons and two daughters, N. F. Culpepper, W. C. Culpepper, T. J. Culpepper, Miss Mary Lou Culpepper and Mrs. D. O. Phillips, all of Greenville; J. W. Culpepper, of Fayetteville, Ga; H. L. Culpepper and E. C. Culpepper of Lone Oak. He was commander of the Meriwether camp of Confederate Veterans at the time of his death. He was a member of the Methodist church and of the Masonic fraternity.
      This is another obituary from an unknown source: S. F. CULPEPPER, SOLDIERS UNDER LEE, LAID TO LAST REST Veteran Public Official of Meriwether County Widely Mourned GREENVILLE, Ga., June 24 -- Mr. Simeon F. Culpepper was buried in the cemetery of Old Prospect Church at Lone Oak on Sunday. The funeral was conducted by Rev. J. T. Robins, of Thomaston, assisted by Rev. A. L. Hale, of Greenville. Mr. Culpepper died here Saturday after an illness of several weeks. He was born in Meriwether County eighty seven years ago and had resided in this county during his entire lifetime. He married Miss Ellen Nall, who died last January, their married life having continued for sixty-two years. He was a Confederate veteran, having served under General Lee in the army of Northern Virginia for four years in the Seventh Georgia Regiment and participated in all of the battles engaged in by this army from First Manassas to Appomatox. He was twice wounded in battle, a minnie ball having passed through both thighs at Gettysburg. He filled the office of tax collector of Meriwether County for two years. Subsequently, he was elected clerk of the Superior Court of the county in which capacity he served for twenty-three years. He was the last member of his family of six brothers and three sisters, his last surviving brother, Captain N. S. Culpepper, of Atlanta, having died about two months ago. He is survived by six sons and two daughters, N. F. Culpepper, W. C. Culpepper, T. J. Culpepper, Miss Mary Lou Culpepper and Mrs. D. O. Phillips all of Greenville; J. W. Culpepper of Fayetteville, Ga., H. L. Culpepper and E. C. Culpepper of Lone Oak. He was commander of the Meriwether camp of Confederate Veterans at the time of his death. He was a member of the Methodist Church and of the Masonic fraternity.
      In a retrospective article "Meriwether County Served By Confederate Veterans After War," which appeared in an unknown paper between 1955 and 1968, James S. Peters wrote: Meriwether County, as most counties in Georgia, was served by confederate veterans for most of 1/2 century after the close of the war. Some of them were still in office when I came to this county in 1919 and I would like now to pay my respect to these old veterans and other fine officials in office at that time... S. F. Culpepper, as a young man, was a school teacher, then volunteered for service in the Civil War, participating in the Battle of Manassas, likewise fought with great gallantry in the Battle of Gettysburg. Mr. and Mrs. Culpepper had one daughter who married Dan Phillips, one of our very fine County Commissioners and six stalwart sons, to wit, Nathaniel, Wesley, Homer, Edgar, Thomas and Wilbur. Thomas is the only one living at this time. No finer family of sons has been reared in this county during this century....
Nathan Culpepper Doughtie, a son of Jerry and Clay (Culpepper) Doughtie visited Gettsyburg and gave the following report at a July 24, 1993 family reunion: Gettysburg, Pennsylvania John Wesley Culpepper and Simeon Fletcher Culpepper were members of company "D" of the eighth Georgia infantry regiment. This regiment, along with the seventh, ninth, eleventh and fifty-ninth regiments, were part of General George T. Anderson's brigade. This brigade was part of General Hood's division which was part of the first army corps under General Longstreet. At the battle of Gettysburg the Army of Northern Virginia, under General Lee, consisted of the first corps under Longstreet, the second corps under Ewell and the third corps under Hill. General Stewart led the cavalry division. On July 2, Anderson's brigade moved across the Emmitsburg road and charged the woods south of what became known as the wheat field. The union forces were pushed back from a stone fence but the confederates were flanked on the left and retreated to the crest of rose hill. They were then reinforced and advanced again. General Anderson was wounded but advanced and occupied the woodland to its border on plum run valley. On July 3rd the brigade was sent down Emmitsburg road to repulse Union calvary which had tried to flank the division. On July 4th the brigade built trenches to protect the army's flank and on July 5th left for Hagerstown, Maryland. Simeon F. Culpepper had been shot through both legs and was left behind with many other wounded Confederates. This may have been better for him in the long run as many of the wounded men were unable to withstand the rigors of travel. Simeon Fletcher was later paroled or exchanged and rejoined his unit for battles in 1864 and was with the army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox in April, 1865. 

Family

Ellen Clay Nall (5 May 1844 - 19 Jan 1929)
Marriage*4 Dec 1866 He married Ellen Clay Nall at Georgia on 4 Dec 1866 at age 24.4 
Children
ChartsHenry Culpeper of Lower Norfolk: DNA Status Chart (Male only, 8 generations)
John Culpepper of Randolph Co, AL: Descendant Chart
Last Edited10 Feb 2011

Citations

  1. 1850 Federal Census, United States.
    Pages 312B-313A, 59th District, Meriwether Co., GA
    G. W. Culpepper, 41, M, Farmer, $1,175, SC
    Perlina Culpepper, 38, F, GA
    J. D. Culpepper, 16, M, GA
    J. W. Culpepper, 13, M, GA
    W. J. Culpepper, 12, M, GA
    N. S. Culpepper, 10, M, GA
    N. L. Culpepper, 9, F, GA
    S. F. Culpepper, 7, M, GA
    S. E. Culpepper, 4, F, GA
    L. J. Culpepper, 3, M, GA
    P. F. Culpepper, 1, F, GA.
  2. Pages 415-416, Lutherville PO, Meriwether Co., GA
    George W. Culpepper, 50, M, Farmer, $2000/$2000, SC
    Paulina Culpepper, 48, F, GA
    James D. Culpepper, 26, M, GA
    Feraba Culpepper, 23, F, GA
    John W. Culpepper, 24, M, GA
    Simeon F. Culpepper, 17, M, GA
    Sallie E. Culpepper, 15, F, GA
    Joel Culpepper, 13, M, GA
    Permelia Culpepper, 11, F, GA
    George Culpepper, 8, M, GA.
  3. USGenWeb Archives.
    http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/copyright.htm
    Meriwether-Coweta-Troup County GA Archives Military Records
    Copyright. All rights reserved. http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/copyright.htm
    http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/ga/gafiles.htm
    File contributed for use in USGenWeb Archives by: Helena-Suzanne Shreve e-mail address March 2, 2004, 1:29 am.
  4. Jordan Dodd, compiler, Georgia Marriages, 1851-1900, Online database at Ancestry.com, 2000.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/vital/gamarr/main.htm
    Simeon F. Culpepper and Ellen C. Nall on 04 Dec 1866 in Meriwether Co., GA.
  5. Priscilla Turner, compiler, Meriwether Co., GA Cemeteries, Spartanburg, SC: , 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Book: 975.8455 V39.
    Greenville City Cemetery, Greenville, Meriwether Co., GA
    + Nathan F. Culpepper, 16 Sep 1867 – 17 Jul 1964
    + Martha Augusta Culpepper, 6 Apr 1879 – 21 Jan 1919.
  6. 1870 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 381A, Family 87, Lutherville PO, Meriwether Co., GA
    Simeon Culpepper, 26, M, School Teacher, $1000/$450, GA
    Ellen Culpepper, 24, F, GA
    Nathan Culpepper, 2, M, GA
    James Culpepper, 9/12, M, GA.
  7. Priscilla Turner, compiler, Meriwether Co., GA Cemeteries, Spartanburg, SC: , 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Book: 975.8455 V39.
    Allen-Lee Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, near Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    + Homer Lee Culpepper, 3 Nov 1871 – 5 Jun 1951.
  8. Priscilla Turner, compiler, Meriwether Co., GA Cemeteries, Spartanburg, SC: , 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Book: 975.8455 V39.
    Allen-Lee Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, near Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    + Edgar C. Culpepper, 7 Mar 1874 – 10 Apr 1951.
  9. Priscilla Turner, compiler, Meriwether Co., GA Cemeteries, Spartanburg, SC: , 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Book: 975.8455 V39.
    Greenville City Cemetery, Greenville, Meriwether Co., GA
    + Wilbur Clay Culpepper, 2 Aug 1876 – 19 Oct 1943
    + Carrie Lou Tigner Culpepper, 24 May 1888 – 19 May 1985.
  10. 1880 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 81, Page 203C (34), Family 263, Luthersville, Meriwether Co., GA
    Sim Culpepper, Self, M, Md, 37, Farming, GA/SC/GA
    Ellen Culpepper, Wife, F, Md, 35, Keeping House, GA/GA/GA
    Nat Culpepper, Son, M, S, 12, Working On Farm, GA/GA/GA
    Wesley Culpepper, Son, M, S, 10, Working On Farm, GA/GA/GA
    Homer Culpepper, Son, M, S, 8, Working On Farm, GA/GA/GA
    Edgar Culpepper, Son, M, S, 6, --- , GA/GA/GA
    Wilber Culpepper, Son, M, S, 3, --- , GA/GA/GA
    Mary Lou Culpepper, Dau, F, S, 1, --- , GA/GA/GA.
  11. U.S. Social Security Administration, compiler, Social Security Death Index (SSDI), Online database at Ancestry.com.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/vital/ssdi/main.htm
  12. Priscilla Turner, compiler, Meriwether Co., GA Cemeteries, Spartanburg, SC: , 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Book: 975.8455 V39.
    Allen-Lee Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, near Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    + Perlina Perdue Culpepper, 27 Jun 1812 – 21 Jul 1882.
  13. Correspondence from Eleanor Herring Culpepper (Mrs. Albert Marvin Willingham), Grantville, GA, to Lew Griffin, 1976-2004.
  14. 1900 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 43, Pages 153A-B (3), Family 63, Seminary Hill, Greenville, Meriwether Co., GA
    Simeon F. Culpepper, Head, M, Oct 1842, 57, Md 34 yrs, GA/GA/GA, Clerk Superior Court
    Ellen C. Culpepper, Wife, F, May 1844, 56, Md 34 yrs, GA/GA/GA
    Nathan F. Culpepper, Son, M, Sep 1867, 32, Sng, GA/GA/GA, Lawyer
    Wilbur C. Culpepper, Son, M, Aug 1875, 24, Sng, GA/GA/GA
    Mary L. Culpepper, Daughter, F, May 1878, 22, Sng, GA/GA/GA
    Thomas J. Culpepper, Son, M, Aug 1881, 18, Sng, GA/GA/GA
    Nettie P. Culpepper, Daughter, F, May 1885, 15, Sng, GA/GA/GA.
  15. Virgil D. White, compiler, Index to Georgia Civil War Confederate Pension Files, Waynesboro, TN: The National Historical Publishing Company, 1996.
    Pages 261-262: Simeon Fletcher Culpepper, served in Company D, 8th GA, he lived Meriwether County, GA
    Simeon Fletcher Culpepper, no service given, witness for Henry T. Shores of Coweta County, GA
    Simeon Fletcher Culpepper, served in Company D, 8th GA, witness for William Glow of Spalding County, GA
    Simeon Fletcher Culpepper, served in Company D, 8th GA, witness for Alonzo H. Freeman of Meriwether Co
    Simeon Fletcher Culpepper, served in Company D, 8th GA, witness for Augusta Williams of Crisp County, GA.
  16. Priscilla Turner, compiler, Meriwether Co., GA Cemeteries, Spartanburg, SC: , 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Book: 975.8455 V39.
    Allen-Lee Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, near Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    + George W. Culpepper, 6 Dec 1808 – 20 Dec 1901.
  17. 1910 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 76, Page 13B, Lines 52-55, LaGrange St, Greenville, Meriwether Co., GA
    Simeon F. Culpepper, Head, M, 67, md1-33 yrs, GA/GA/GA, Superior Court Clerk
    Ellen C. Culpepper, Wife, F, 65, md1-33 yrs, ch 8/8, GA/GA/GA
    Mary L. Culpepper, Daughter, F, 30, Sng, GA/GA/GA
    Nettie P. Culpepper, Daughter, F, 26, Sng, GA/GA/GA.
  18. 1920 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 80, Page 1B, Lines 88-90, Greenville, Meriwether Co., GA
    Sim F. Culpepper, Head, M, 76, md, GA/NC/GA, Farm General Mgr
    Ellen C. Culpepper, Wife, F, 75, md, GA/GA/GA
    Mary Lou Culpepper, Daughter, F, 40, Sng, GA/GA/GA.
  19. Georgia Health Department / Office of Vital Records, compiler, Georgia Deaths, 1919-1998, Online database at Ancestry.com, 1998.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/inddbs/5426a.htm
    Mrs. S. F. Culpepper, d. 19 Jan 1929 in Meriwether Co., GA.
  20. Priscilla Turner, compiler, Meriwether Co., GA Cemeteries, Spartanburg, SC: , 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Book: 975.8455 V39.
    Allen-Lee Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, near Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    + Ellen Clay Nall Culpepper, 5 May 1844 – 19 Jan 1929.
  21. Georgia Health Department / Office of Vital Records, compiler, Georgia Deaths, 1919-1998, Online database at Ancestry.com, 1998.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/inddbs/5426a.htm
    S. F. Culpepper, d. 22 Jun 1929 in Meriwether Co., GA.
  22. Priscilla Turner, compiler, Meriwether Co., GA Cemeteries, Spartanburg, SC: , 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Book: 975.8455 V39.
    Allen-Lee Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, near Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    + Simeon Fletcher Culpepper, 11 Oct 1840 (sic) – 22 Jun 1929, Sgt., Co. D, 8th GA Inf.