Captain Thomas Cooper

Male, #10008, (1733 - before 13 Feb 1796)
Ancestry Unknown* Information about the ancestry and siblings of Captain Thomas Cooper is wanted. See page footer for contact information.
     On 14 Dec 2010, Martin Cooper wrote: "I have been trying for several years to prove the connection of Captain Thomas to my earliest proven Cooper ancestor, John (1742-1835), whom Sarah Edna Cooper Holtzclaw listed as a sibling of Captain Thomas. I do have some additional info on John, but nothing that connects him to Captain Thomas other than the Holtzclaw statement. Also, I have a very good book on the life of "Mark Anthony Cooper, the Iron Man of Georgia." It contains a lot of detail on the wife of Captain Thomas, Sarah Anthony. There is also an interesting article on the Coopers and Anthony's from the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, vol. 9."1 
Birth*1733 Thomas was born at Frederick Co., Virginia, in 1733. In The Family Record of John Cooper 1778-1909, privately published in 1909, Sarah Edna Cooper Holtzclaw states “In 1620, there was a corporate body of men formed in London, known as the London Company. They settled in Virginia, their object being to develop the country and to protect the English interests as well. Among the names of this corporation we find that of John Cooper, who, we think, is the ancestor of our family, as our family came from Virginia. The next Cooper we find is Thomas, Sr., who lived in Henry County, Virginia. We think Thomas Jr and John were his sons and probably James, William and Arthur as all lived in the same county.”.2,3 
Immigration1741 He immigrated in 1741 to Virginia
Birth of Son1757 His son Joseph Cooper was born in 1757 at Henry Co., Virginia.4 
Marriage*8 Jan 1762 He married Sarah Anthony at Bedford Co., Virginia, on 8 Jan 1762. 
Birth of Sonsay 1769 His son John Cooper was born say 1769 at Henry Co., Virginia.5 
Birth of Son1771 His son Thomas Cooper Jr. was born in 1771 at Henry Co., Virginia.6 
American Revolution*between 1775 and 1783 He provided service in the American Revolutionary War between 1775 and 1783
(DAR Listing: Thomas Cooper, born circa 1733-35 in Virginia, died 13 Feb 1796 in Georgia, married Sarah Anthony, Patriotic Service, Virginia.)4 
Birth of Sonsay 1782 His son Micajah Cooper was born say 1782 at Henry Co., Virginia
Relocation*say 1790 He relocated say 1790 at Wilkes Co., Georgia, In his Story of Georgia, and Georgia People, George G. Smith wrote that many of the Hancock County settlers came from Mecklenberg and Rowan counties, in North Carolina, as well as from Virginia. Many of these lived in Jefferson and Burke counties before moving into the section of Washington County which later became Greene and Hancock. Smith wrote that there were two classes of people before 1800: (1) slave owners with a few Negroes and about four hundred acres, and (2) yeomen with two hundred acres and only his family for labor. The wealthier families cultivated their plantations in the county but built their homes in Sparta.
     Choice land in Hancock County was considered to be along the Oconee River and its tributaries, particularly Shoulderbone Creek. Fort Creek junctured with Shoulderbone very near where it junctured with the Oconee. Quite early Fort Twiggs was built in this vicinity to give protection to the settlers and to guard the ford where the Upper Trading Path of the Creeks crossed these creeks. This protection attracted additional settlers to the area. Pine Woods House Trading Store, built near the fort, became the hub of political and social activities for the area.
     Shoulderbone Creek is a long creek rising in Greene County, with numerous tributaries. The naming of Shoulderbone Creek is similar to the naming of Scull Shoals. Prehistoric earth mounds and an early Indian village and burial grounds were in close proximity. Spring floods through the years have continued to wash up human bones. In the early days, a human scapula and humerus bone were found against a rock in the creek, so the pioneer settlers called it Shoulderbone Creek. The county line established in 1793, when Hancock was cut off from Greene County, was just below Fosters' Stockade, a short distance from where Shoulderbone Creek enters the Oconee River.
     (A list of Hancock County settlers along the Oconee River tributaries and valley is then given, and included among them are Thomas Cooper and Mark A. Cooper.)
     All the settlers sought a desirable spot near a spring, and near a trail leading to civilization. As quickly as possible, trees were cut to clear land for a home and a patch for a food crop. The trees were used to build first a stockade for protection against the Indians, then a log cabin-many double, because most families were large in number with some sons old enough to help. Rails were split to fence around the patches. The livestock roamed in the grasslands and woodlands. Settlers helped each other accomplish these necessary tasks, while some were on constant watchful guard against the Indians.
     In the early years, farm crops were primarily for human and animal consumption. Food crops of corn, beans, and potatoes were planted. Also, a few rows of cotton were planted in the garden for personal household use. The seeds had to be tediously picked from the lint before spinning could be done. A herd of sheep provided the wool for most of the clothing and covering. Tobacco and indigo were planted for personal use and as cash crops. The indigo was used to make a blue dye. Tobacco had been the primary money crop on their Virginia and North Carolina farms and it would continue to be until after the War of 1812. Surpluses of both these crops were exported and the cash used for sugar, coffee, tools, medicine, and ammunition.
     Other sources of income were from their livestock and from timber….7 
Will*20 Aug 1793 He made a will at Greene Co., Georgia, on 20 Aug 1793

The Will of Thomas Cooper, Georgia, Hancock County.
In the name of God, Amen! I Thomas Cooper of Green County and State of Georgia being in perfect health and sound mind calling to mind the mortality of the body do make and constitute this my last will and testament.
First, - I give my soul to god who gave it to me, and my body to the grave to be decently buried in hopes of a resurection to eternal life through the merits of Jesus Christ.
I give to my loving wife Sarah Cooper one negro woman named Winney, one horse and saddle, one feather bed and furniture and two cows and calves to her and her heirs forever. I lend to my during her life two negroes named George and Hannah.
I lend by wife one other negro named Judah until my youngest daughter comes of age or marries.
I lend to my wife during her widowhood, the trace of land whereon I now live together with the mill thereon and it is also my will that by the consent of my wife my executors shall dispose of the land whose title shall be valid and with the money purchase a tract of land northerly where I wish my wife and family to remove to and further it is my will that after my wifes decease or marriage the above willed land shall be sold and equally divided between all my surviving daughters.
I give to my daughter Elizabeth, two negroes Rachel and Charles.
I give to my son Joseph, two negroes Milly and her youngest child together with a tract of land lying on Logden Creek, containing two hundred and seventy acres.
I give to my daughter Agnes, two negroes Vinney and Toney.
I give to my son Thomas one negro named Will, one feather bed and furniture, two cows and calves together with my upper tract of land on Logdam Creek containing two hundred and seventy acres.
I give to my daughter Polly, two negroes Boland and Davy.
I give to my daughter Penelope four negroes, Jim, Biddy, Thency and Benn, one feather bed and furniture, one horse and saddle and two cows and calves.
I give to my son John, one negro named Sam, one horse and saddle one bed and furniture, two cows and calves.
I give to my son Micajah, one negro named Nelly, one horse and saddle, one feather bed and furniture and two cows and calves.
I give to my daughter Sarah, four negroes, Theny Frank and John, when she marries or comes of age and after my wifes death or marriage a negro named Judah.
I give to my two sons John and Micajah my two bounties of land on Sand Run to be equally divided by my executors, having respect to quality and quantity, and it is further my will that my mill Logan Creek together with a lot of land containing 30 to 35 acres be sold to the best advantage, ten pounds of which money I give my son Joseph and ten pounds to my son Thomas, the balance to be equally divided between my two sons John and Micajah, and
It is further my will that all my just debts be paid and all my estate not herein bequeathed shall be at the disposal of my executors to purchase a tract of land and make the improvements etc for my wife and family should she choose to move Northwardly, and
It is further my will that after the decease or marriage of my wife, the property purchased with my estate shall be equally divided among all my children.
I do constitute and appoint as my executors, Thomas Stoval, John Dillard, Joseph Cooper, Jr., Thomas Cooper, Jr., George Hamilton and Henry Graybill for this my will and testiment, making all former wills void. Witness my hand this twentieth day of August, seventeen hundred and ninety-three. /s/ Thomas Cooper. Wit. B. Anthony, Josiah Carter, Joseph Cooper.
 
Deed28 Feb 1794 He or Thomas Cooper Jr. was granted a deed. On 28 Feb 1794 at Clarks Fork of Long Creek, Wilkes Co., Georgia, ([M)]; Book MM, 1794-1795, p. 339, 28 Feb. 1794, James McLean and Ruth, his wife, to Thomas Cooper, all of Wilkes Co., for £200, 300 acres, originally granted to said McLean, on Clarks Fork of Long Creek. (signed) Jas. McLean, Ruth (x) McLean. Wit: George Hamilton, Wm. Hudspeth, Clayton Talbott. Proved by George Hamilton, 30 Dec. 1794, H. Mounger, J.P. Regd. 10 Jan. 1795. (This could be either Thomas Cooper Sr. or Jr.)8
 
Deed*28 Feb 1794 He or Thomas Cooper Jr. was granted a deed. On 28 Feb 1794 at Clarks Fork of Long Creek, Wilkes Co., Georgia, ([M)]; Book MM, 1794-1795, p. 338, 28 Feb. 1794, James McLean and Ruth, his wife, to Thomas Cooper, all of Wilkes Co., for £50, on Clarks Fork of Long Creek, 80 acres, adj. Robertson, said McLean, part of 500 acres granted to said McLean, 5 Aug. 1785. (signed) Jas. McLean, Ruth (x) McLean. Wit: Clayton Talbott, George Hamilton, Wm. Hudspeth. Proved by Geo. Hamilton, 30 Dec. 1794, H. Mounger, J.P. Regd. 10 Jan. 1795. (This grant was either to Thomas Cooper Sr. or Jr.8
Biography*circa 1796 "Around 1796, there was raised in Hancock County what was claimed to be the first crop of cotton ever grown in Georgia," wrote James E. Callaway, in The Early Settlement of Georgia. This statement should probably be qualified by adding short-staple cotton, as coastal Georgia had been growing long-staple cotton years before that. Thomas Cooper, who owned 1,596 acres of red clay oak and hickory land, deemed to be the best suited for cotton cultivation, was reputedly the cultivator of this first cotton crop. It is not known whether Cooper had acquired a replica of the cotton gin, invented by Eli Whitney in 1793, to remove the seeds from his short-staple cotton. The invention of the cotton gin revolutionized cotton production in the South.9 
Death*before 13 Feb 1796 He died at Hancock Co., Georgia, before 13 Feb 1796.10 
Probate*13 Feb 1796 A probate action was taken on his estate on 13 Feb 1796 at Hancock Co., Georgia,

Will probated by the oath of Josiah Carter and Joseph Cooper, Sr., two of the subscribing witnesses. Joseph Cooper, Jr. and Thomas Cooper Jr. qualified as executors.

An account registered of the receipts of Legatees and others of said estate by Joseph and Thomas Cooper, executors, Jan. 10, 1798

1. Jas.Nesbit, recp't for property willed to him by Thomas Cooper, Sr., dec'd.
2. George Hamilton's rec'pt for the property willed to him by said deceased.
3. John Weeks recp't for the property willed to him by said deceased.
4. Thomas Lancaster's recp't for fifty dollars as part of a legacy bequeathed by said deceased.
5. Thomas Lancaster's recp't fo four negroes willed to him by the said deceased. (Remark: Thomas (wife Sarah) was not to receive the fourth negro until the death of wife of decedent according to the will. A married daughter could not receive her share, but her husband. (Ga. Law))
6. George Hamitlon's recp't for fourteen dollars part of his legacy.
7. John Cooper's receipt for fourteen dollars part of his legacy.
8. James Cooper's receipt for fourteen dollars as part of his legacy.
9. Thomas Lancaster's receipt for fourteen dollars as part of his legacy.
10. John Weeks receipt for fourteen dollars as part of his legacy.
11. Joseph Coopers Ditto Ditto
12. James Coopers receipt for $tp as part of his legacy.
13. John Cooper's receipt for 1 negro named Sam, cream colored mare at $43.00, cow and calf, furniture, etc. as part of his legacy

Record Book A A page 40
Vouchers registered by the Estate of Thomas Cooper dec'd - the 7th of Jan'y, 1799

James Nesbits receipt for %50, being a Legatee..........$50.00
H. Holt recpt for tax, 1797                           6.201/4
Joseph Cooper, guardian for Micajah Cooper (minor)
recp't for 1 negro womand child being part of the
property willed to him by Thos.Cooper dec'd. Jos.
Coopers recp't as above................... 131.00

Augustine Thomas, and Joseph Stovall attorneys for
John Waller, recp't for fourteen dollars..............14.00

Ellet Woods proven acct. for half (?) illegible -
Pound sign l - 8s -8d and 3s sterling           5.39

One Letter of Attorney to Joseph Stovall and Augustine
Thomas of Virginia to Collect the legacy of John Waller,
a Legatee of the Estate of Thomas Cooper, dec'd lodged in
my office by the executors of said Estate Jan. 7, 1799

Martin Martin's recp't for costs
Wm. Lawson against Thos. Cooper, Ex                      77.25
Nov. 1801
J. C. Waltons recp't for fees in the above suit           4.00
Henry Graybill (atty) receipt                          2.50
Micajah Coopers receipts for attendance as witness           2.85
S. Abercrombies receipt for tax                     12.1/2

Record Book AA, page 41. Hancock County , GA.
Thomas Cooper, Executor of the Estate of Thomas Cooper, dec'd.
Received of Moses Going, for the said estate, Oct. 15, 1801 $132.39

An account of moneys paid out of estate of Thomas Cooper, dec'd:

Thomas Lancaster     Receipt          $27.00
George Hamiltons     ditto           27.00
James Nesbits           ditto      27.00
John Weeks           ditto           27.00
Micajah Coopers      ditto      27.00
Joseph Coopers           ditto      27.00
John Coopers      ditto      27.00
John Matthews      ditto           8.00
Myles Greens          ditto           1.75
Andrew Baxters          note 19.36.11
 

Family

Sarah Anthony (15 Aug 1742 - 13 Feb 1796)
Marriage*8 Jan 1762 He married Sarah Anthony at Bedford Co., Virginia, on 8 Jan 1762. 
Children
ChartsWLC / Warren L. Culpepper Ancestral Chart
Last Edited30 Apr 2012

Citations

  1. E-mail written 14 dec 2010 to Warren Culpepper from Martin Cooper, e-mail address.
  2. William J. Northern, Men of Mark in Georgia, Vol. V, A. B. Caldwell, 1910.
    " Samuel Boykin", pages 338-340.
  3. E-mail written 4 Jul 2008 to Culpepper Connections from Penny Hall, e-mail address.
  4. DAR Patriot Index, Washington, DC: National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, 2003.
  5. Katherine Bowman Walters, Oconee River Tales to Tell, Eaton, Putnam Co., GA: Eaton, Putnam Co. (GA) Historical Society, 1995.
    Page 126.
  6. Edward F. Hull, Early Records of Putnam County, Georgia, 1807-1860: Old Cemeteries Wills and Marriages, Ashland, AL, 190?.
    "Thomas Cooper, Died July 5, 1843, age 72 years", page 17.
  7. Katherine Bowman Walters, Oconee River Tales to Tell, Eaton, Putnam Co., GA: Eaton, Putnam Co. (GA) Historical Society, 1995.
    pages 62-63.
  8. Michael Martin Farmer, Wilkes Co., GA Deed Books A - VV, 1784 - 1806, Farmer Genealogy, Dallas.
  9. Katherine Bowman Walters, Oconee River Tales to Tell, Eaton, Putnam Co., GA: Eaton, Putnam Co. (GA) Historical Society, 1995.
    Page 205.
  10. Based upon date of probate.
  11. http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~lksstarr/reports/thewill.txt
  12. http://www.oursouthernancestors.com/clark-002.htm, which cites John Bennett Boddie, "Historical Southern Families, pages 30-31.
  13. RootsWeb WorldConnect Project, Ancestry.com: Rootsweb.
    http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/
    "Alexander's - Southside VA/NC, GA & AL"; contact: e-mail address.
  14. RootsWeb WorldConnect Project, Ancestry.com: Rootsweb.
    http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/
    "CONNECTED"; Contact: Jana Long, e-mail address.
  15. Edward F. Hull, Early Records of Putnam County, Georgia, 1807-1860: Old Cemeteries Wills and Marriages, Ashland, AL, 190?.
    Will of Thomas Cooper dated 29 May 1843 and probated 10 Jul 1843. Page 29: Cites Will Book B-page 178.