Stephen Dale Chapman

Male, #11431

Family

Deborah Elaine Culpepper
Last Edited28 Jul 2010

Missouri Culpepper1

Female, #11433, (circa 1852 - )
Father*Emanuel Joseph Culpepper1 (4 Jul 1824 - 30 May 1889)
Mother*Pamelia Ann Phillips (19 Aug 1828 - c 1900)
Birth*circa 1852 Missouri was born at Floyd Co., Georgia, circa 1852.1 
Marriage*5 Apr 1874 She married Pleasant J. Favor at DeKalb Co., Alabama, on 5 Apr 1874.1 
Married Name5 Apr 1874  As of 5 Apr 1874, her married name was Favor. 

Family

Pleasant J. Favor (say 1850 - )
ChartsWilliam Culpepper of Warren Co., GA: Descendant Chart
Last Edited14 Feb 2005

Citations

  1. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 152.

Laura Ingram1

Female, #11434, (22 Jul 1890 - Nov 1975)
Birth*22 Jul 1890 Laura was born on 22 Jul 1890.2 
Married Namesay 1908  As of say 1908, her married name was Bankston.1 
Marriage*say 1908 She married James L. Bankston say 1908.1 
Death of Spouse1 Mar 1919 Her husband James L. Bankston died on 1 Mar 1919. 
Marriage*between 1920 and 1940 She married John E. Culpepper between 1920 and 1940. John and Laura Culpepper had no children.1 
Married Namebetween 1920 and 1940  As of between 1920 and 1940, her married name was Culpepper.1 
Death*Nov 1975 She died at Scottsboro, Jackson Co., Alabama, in Nov 1975 at age 85.2 
Burial*Nov 1975 Her body was interred in Nov 1975 at Old Harmony Cemetery, Jackson Co., Alabama

Family 1

James L. Bankston (26 Jul 1886 - 1 Mar 1919)
Marriage*say 1908 She married James L. Bankston say 1908.1 

Family 2

John E. Culpepper (14 Oct 1873 - 22 Apr 1948)
Marriage*between 1920 and 1940 She married John E. Culpepper between 1920 and 1940. John and Laura Culpepper had no children.1 
Last Edited3 Mar 2005

Citations

  1. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 210.
  2. U.S. Social Security Administration, compiler, Social Security Death Index (SSDI), Online database at Ancestry.com.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/vital/ssdi/main.htm

Estelle Mae Culpepper1,2

Female, #11435
Father*King Franklin Culpepper2 (7 Jan 1903 - 7 Sep 1964)
Mother*Arizona Adlaid Townsend2 (6 Jul 1905 - 2 May 1990)

Family 1

Kenneth E. Moss

Family 2

Ben Curtis
ChartsWilliam Culpepper of Warren Co., GA: Descendant Chart
Last Edited1 Mar 2005

Citations

  1. E-mail to Lew Griffin from Lilly Ruth Culpepper Hammond, (256) 582-2824.
  2. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 196.

Kenneth E. Moss1

Male, #11436

Family

Estelle Mae Culpepper
Last Edited14 May 2004

Citations

  1. USGenWeb Archives.
    http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/copyright.htm
    Walker Co., GA Marriages
    Estel M. Culpepper (20) and Kenneth E. Moss (19) on 12 Dec 1943 in Walker Co., GA, 23-54.

Ben Curtis1

Male, #11437

Family

Estelle Mae Culpepper
Last Edited1 Mar 2005

Citations

  1. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 197.

Emmitt Franklin Culpepper1,2,3

Male, #11438, (31 Dec 1925 - 8 Jan 2004)
Father*King Franklin Culpepper1 (7 Jan 1903 - 7 Sep 1964)
Mother*Arizona Adlaid Townsend1 (6 Jul 1905 - 2 May 1990)
Name Variation He was also known as Emmett. 
Birth*31 Dec 1925 Emmitt was born at Jackson Co., Alabama, on 31 Dec 1925.3,4 
SSN*between 1936 and 1950 His Social Security Number was issued between 1936 and 1950 in Alabama.3 
Residence*Aug 1944 Emmitt resided at Jackson Co., Alabama, in Aug 1944.5 
World War II*between 1944 and 1946 Emmett enlisted at Fort McClellan, Alabama and served in the US Army from August 29, 1944 to August 28, 1946 as a Landing Craft Seaman with Company "B," 594th Engineer Boat and Shore Regiment in the Asiatic Pacific Theater, participating in the Southern Philippines Liberation. He received the Good Conduct Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Theater Ribbon with one Bronze Star, three Overseas Service Bars, Army of Occupation Medal Japan, Victory Ribbon with one Bronze Star, and the Philippine Liberation Ribbon.6,5
Emmett Franklin Culpepper
Death of Father7 Sep 1964 His father King Franklin Culpepper died on 7 Sep 1964 at Section, Jackson Co., Alabama.1 
Death of Mother2 May 1990 His mother Arizona Adlaid Townsend died on 2 May 1990 at Section, Jackson Co., Alabama.3,1 
Death*8 Jan 2004 He died at Section, Jackson Co., Alabama, on 8 Jan 2004 at age 78.3 
Burial*circa 10 Jan 2004 His body was interred circa 10 Jan 2004 at Macedonia Cemetery, Section, Jackson Co., Alabama.2 

Family

Bobby Jo Pressley
Child
ChartsWilliam Culpepper of Warren Co., GA: Descendant Chart
Last Edited19 Jul 2010

Citations

  1. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 196.
  2. National Cemetery Administration, compiler, US Veterans Gravesites, 1775-2006, Online database at Ancestry.com, 2006.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=8750
    Emmitt F Culpepper, PFC US ARMY WORLD WAR II, 1925 - 2004, buried at Macedonia Cemetery, Section, Jackson Co., Alabama 35771.
  3. U.S. Social Security Administration, compiler, Social Security Death Index (SSDI), Online database at Ancestry.com.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/vital/ssdi/main.htm
  4. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 197.
  5. National Archives and Records Administration, compiler, U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946, Online database at Ancestry.com, 2005.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=8939
    Emitt F. Culpepper, born 1925, White, Native of Alabama; Resided in Jackson Co., Alabama; Enlisted on 29 Aug 1944 in Alabama at Fort McClellan in the US Army as a Private for the duration of the War plus six months; Education: Grammar school; Civil Occupation: Automobile Serviceman; Marital Status: Single, without dependents.
  6. Source: Bobby Jo Pressley Culpepper, wife.

Milford Eugene Culpepper1,2

Male, #11439, (23 Aug 1928 - 28 Mar 1979)
Father*King Franklin Culpepper2 (7 Jan 1903 - 7 Sep 1964)
Mother*Arizona Adlaid Townsend2 (6 Jul 1905 - 2 May 1990)
Nickname  Milford Eugene Culpepper also went by the name of Pug Culpepper.3 
Birth*23 Aug 1928 Milford was born at Jackson Co., Alabama, on 23 Aug 1928.4,5 
Photographed*say 1952 He was photographed say 1952.6
Milford Eugene Culpepper
Korean War*1953 He served in the Korean War in 1953
(Milford Eugene Culpepper entered the US Army May 21, 1953 and served in the 101st Airborne Division, that included a tour of duty in Korea during the war. His duty in Korea was to parachute behind enemy lines and set up communications.)7 
Death of Father7 Sep 1964 His father King Franklin Culpepper died on 7 Sep 1964 at Section, Jackson Co., Alabama.2 
Death*28 Mar 1979 He died at Fort Payne, DeKalb Co., Alabama, on 28 Mar 1979 at age 50.4,5 
Burial*30 Mar 1979 His body was interred on 30 Mar 1979 at Northeast Memorial Cemetery, Rainsville, DeKalb Co., Alabama.5 

Family

Frances Jackson
Children
ChartsWilliam Culpepper of Warren Co., GA: Descendant Chart
Last Edited31 Aug 2011

Citations

  1. E-mail to Lew Griffin from Lilly Ruth Culpepper Hammond, (256) 582-2824.
  2. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 196.
  3. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
  4. U.S. Social Security Administration, compiler, Social Security Death Index (SSDI), Online database at Ancestry.com.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/vital/ssdi/main.htm
  5. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 197.
  6. E-mail written 1999 - 2010 to Lew Griffin from Ruby Jo (Culpepper) Gillespie, 1814 Royal Fern Lane, Fleming Island, FL 32003, e-mail address.
  7. E-mail written Mar 2010 to Lew Griffin from Ruby Jo (Culpepper) Gillespie ID: 11441, 1814 Royal Fern Lane, Fleming Island, FL 32003, e-mail address.

James Melvin Culpepper1,2

Male, #11440
Father*King Franklin Culpepper2 (7 Jan 1903 - 7 Sep 1964)
Mother*Arizona Adlaid Townsend2 (6 Jul 1905 - 2 May 1990)

Family

Rose Lee Prater (10 Jun 1933 - 1 Jul 1976)
Children
ChartsWilliam Culpepper of Warren Co., GA: Descendant Chart
Last Edited1 Mar 2005

Citations

  1. E-mail to Lew Griffin from Lilly Ruth Culpepper Hammond, (256) 582-2824.
  2. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 196.
  3. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 198.

Ruby Jo Culpepper1,2

Female, #11441
Father*King Franklin Culpepper2 (7 Jan 1903 - 7 Sep 1964)
Mother*Arizona Adlaid Townsend2 (6 Jul 1905 - 2 May 1990)

Family

Troy N. Gillespie
ChartsWilliam Culpepper of Warren Co., GA: Descendant Chart
Last Edited1 Mar 2005

Citations

  1. E-mail to Lew Griffin from Lilly Ruth Culpepper Hammond, (256) 582-2824.
  2. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 196.

Troy N. Gillespie1

Male, #11442

Family

Ruby Jo Culpepper
Last Edited1 Mar 2005

Citations

  1. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 198.

Rayford Leon Culpepper1,2

Male, #11443, (13 Apr 1935 - 3 Jan 1975)
Father*King Franklin Culpepper2 (7 Jan 1903 - 7 Sep 1964)
Mother*Arizona Adlaid Townsend2 (6 Jul 1905 - 2 May 1990)
Birth*13 Apr 1935 Rayford was born at Jackson Co., Alabama, on 13 Apr 1935.3,4 
Military service*between 1953 and 1954 Rayford Leon Culpepper served in the US Army from April 1953 to October 1954. He had an auto accident in September 1953, while on leave before going overseas, and was medically discharged in October 1954 .5 
Photographed*say 1960 He was photographed say 1960.6
Rayford Leon Culpepper
Death of Father7 Sep 1964 His father King Franklin Culpepper died on 7 Sep 1964 at Section, Jackson Co., Alabama.2 
Death*3 Jan 1975 He died at Section, Jackson Co., Alabama, on 3 Jan 1975 at age 39.3 

Family

Eula Mae Kirk
Children
ChartsWilliam Culpepper of Warren Co., GA: Descendant Chart
Last Edited1 Sep 2011

Citations

  1. E-mail to Lew Griffin from Lilly Ruth Culpepper Hammond, (256) 582-2824.
  2. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 196.
  3. U.S. Social Security Administration, compiler, Social Security Death Index (SSDI), Online database at Ancestry.com.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/vital/ssdi/main.htm
  4. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 198.
  5. E-mail written Mar 2010 to Lew Griffin from Ruby Jo (Culpepper) Gillespie ID: 11441, 1814 Royal Fern Lane, Fleming Island, FL 32003, e-mail address.
  6. E-mail written 1999 - 2010 to Lew Griffin from Ruby Jo (Culpepper) Gillespie, 1814 Royal Fern Lane, Fleming Island, FL 32003, e-mail address.

A. B. Culpepper1,2

Male, #11444
Father*King Franklin Culpepper2 (7 Jan 1903 - 7 Sep 1964)
Mother*Arizona Adlaid Townsend2 (6 Jul 1905 - 2 May 1990)

Family

Barbara Blackston
Children
ChartsWilliam Culpepper of Warren Co., GA: Descendant Chart
Last Edited1 Mar 2005

Citations

  1. E-mail to Lew Griffin from Lilly Ruth Culpepper Hammond, (256) 582-2824.
  2. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 196.
  3. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 199.

Ella Mae Culpepper1,2

Female, #11445
Father*King Franklin Culpepper2 (7 Jan 1903 - 7 Sep 1964)
Mother*Arizona Adlaid Townsend2 (6 Jul 1905 - 2 May 1990)

Family

Gee Smith
ChartsWilliam Culpepper of Warren Co., GA: Descendant Chart
Last Edited1 Mar 2005

Citations

  1. E-mail to Lew Griffin from Lilly Ruth Culpepper Hammond, (256) 582-2824.
  2. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 196.

Lilly Ruth Culpepper1,2

Female, #11446, (14 Dec 1941 - 18 May 2003)
Father*King Franklin Culpepper2 (7 Jan 1903 - 7 Sep 1964)
Mother*Arizona Adlaid Townsend2 (6 Jul 1905 - 2 May 1990)
Birth*14 Dec 1941 Lilly was born at Jackson Co., Alabama, on 14 Dec 1941.3 
Married Name7 May 1960  As of 7 May 1960, her married name was Hammond.3 
Marriage*7 May 1960 She married Thurmon J. Hammond Jr. on 7 May 1960 at age 18. Thurman and Lilly Ruth Hammond had two children: Chris Hammond and Angela Hammond.3 
Death of Father7 Sep 1964 Her father King Franklin Culpepper died on 7 Sep 1964 at Section, Jackson Co., Alabama.2 
Photographed*say 1984 She was photographed say 1984 at Alabama.4
Lily Ruth (Culpepper) Hammond
Death of Mother2 May 1990 Her mother Arizona Adlaid Townsend died on 2 May 1990 at Section, Jackson Co., Alabama.5,2 
Death*18 May 2003 She died at Guntersville, Marshall Co., Alabama, on 18 May 2003 at age 61.3 
Burial*22 May 2003 Her body was interred on 22 May 2003 at Macedonia Cemetery, Section, Jackson Co., Alabama.3 

Family

Thurmon J. Hammond Jr. (16 Aug 1940 - 16 Nov 2013)
Marriage*7 May 1960 She married Thurmon J. Hammond Jr. on 7 May 1960 at age 18. Thurman and Lilly Ruth Hammond had two children: Chris Hammond and Angela Hammond.3 
ChartsWilliam Culpepper of Warren Co., GA: Descendant Chart
Last Edited28 Mar 2010

Citations

  1. E-mail to Lew Griffin from Lilly Ruth Culpepper Hammond, (256) 582-2824.
  2. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 196.
  3. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 200.
  4. E-mail written 1999 - 2010 to Lew Griffin from Ruby Jo (Culpepper) Gillespie, 1814 Royal Fern Lane, Fleming Island, FL 32003, e-mail address.
  5. U.S. Social Security Administration, compiler, Social Security Death Index (SSDI), Online database at Ancestry.com.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/vital/ssdi/main.htm

Thurmon J. Hammond Jr.1

Male, #11447, (16 Aug 1940 - 16 Nov 2013)
Birth*16 Aug 1940 Thurmon was born on 16 Aug 1940.1 
Marriage*7 May 1960 He married Lilly Ruth Culpepper on 7 May 1960 at age 19. Thurman and Lilly Ruth Hammond had two children: Chris Hammond and Angela Hammond.1 
Death of Spouse18 May 2003 His wife Lilly Ruth Culpepper died on 18 May 2003 at Guntersville, Marshall Co., Alabama.1 
Death*16 Nov 2013 He died on 16 Nov 2013 at age 73.2 

Family

Lilly Ruth Culpepper (14 Dec 1941 - 18 May 2003)
Last Edited3 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 200.
  2. U.S. Social Security Administration, compiler, Social Security Death Index (SSDI), Online database at Ancestry.com.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/vital/ssdi/main.htm

Roger Dale Culpepper1,2

Male, #11448, (5 Oct 1943 - 28 Jan 1998)
Father*King Franklin Culpepper2 (7 Jan 1903 - 7 Sep 1964)
Mother*Arizona Adlaid Townsend2 (6 Jul 1905 - 2 May 1990)
Birth*5 Oct 1943 Roger was born at Jackson Co., Alabama, on 5 Oct 1943.3 
Death of Father7 Sep 1964 His father King Franklin Culpepper died on 7 Sep 1964 at Section, Jackson Co., Alabama.2 
Photographed*say 1965 He was photographed say 1965 at Jackson Co., Alabama.4
Roger Dale Culpepper
Death of Mother2 May 1990 His mother Arizona Adlaid Townsend died on 2 May 1990 at Section, Jackson Co., Alabama.5,2 
Photographed1997 He was photographed in 1997 at Jackson Co., Alabama.6
Roger Dale Culpepper
Death*28 Jan 1998 He died at Macedonia, Jackson Co., Alabama, on 28 Jan 1998 at age 54.3 
Burial*30 Jan 1998 His body was interred on 30 Jan 1998 at Hollywood Cemtery, Jackson Co., Alabama.3 

Family

Lois Ann Nevills
Children
ChartsWilliam Culpepper of Warren Co., GA: Descendant Chart
Last Edited1 Sep 2011

Citations

  1. E-mail to Lew Griffin from Lilly Ruth Culpepper Hammond, (256) 582-2824.
  2. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 196.
  3. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 200.
  4. E-mail written 1999 - 2010 to Lew Griffin from Ruby Jo (Culpepper) Gillespie, 1814 Royal Fern Lane, Fleming Island, FL 32003, e-mail address.
  5. U.S. Social Security Administration, compiler, Social Security Death Index (SSDI), Online database at Ancestry.com.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/vital/ssdi/main.htm
  6. E-mail written Mar 2010 to Lew Griffin from Ruby Jo (Culpepper) Gillespie ID: 11441, 1814 Royal Fern Lane, Fleming Island, FL 32003, e-mail address.

Linda Rae Culpepper1,2

Female, #11449
Father*King Franklin Culpepper2 (7 Jan 1903 - 7 Sep 1964)
Mother*Arizona Adlaid Townsend2 (6 Jul 1905 - 2 May 1990)

Family 1

George Whitaker

Family 2

John Edwards Snyder
ChartsWilliam Culpepper of Warren Co., GA: Descendant Chart
Last Edited2 Mar 2005

Citations

  1. E-mail to Lew Griffin from Lilly Ruth Culpepper Hammond, (256) 582-2824.
  2. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 196.

George Whitaker1

Male, #11450

Family

Linda Rae Culpepper
Last Edited2 Mar 2005

Citations

  1. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 200.

Donald Raymond Culpepper1,2

Male, #11451
Father*King Franklin Culpepper2 (7 Jan 1903 - 7 Sep 1964)
Mother*Arizona Adlaid Townsend2 (6 Jul 1905 - 2 May 1990)

Family 1

Gale Phillips
Children

Family 2

Frances Wells
ChartsWilliam Culpepper of Warren Co., GA: Descendant Chart
Last Edited2 Mar 2005

Citations

  1. E-mail to Lew Griffin from Lilly Ruth Culpepper Hammond, (256) 582-2824.
  2. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 196.
  3. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 200.

John Edwards Snyder1

Male, #11452

Family

Linda Rae Culpepper
Last Edited2 Mar 2005

Citations

  1. Maxine Culpepper Barron, Author: e-mail address, Culpepper, P.O. Box 382, Rainsville, Alabama 35986: M and M Publishing, 2004 .
    P. 200.

Robert Lee Griffin

Male, #11453, (18 Jan 1817 - 30 Mar 1895)
Birth*18 Jan 1817 Robert was born at Wayne Co., North Carolina, on 18 Jan 1817. 
Employment* Robert's occupation: farmer. 
Marriage*23 Nov 1843 He married Mary Ann Wise at Pike Co., Georgia, on 23 Nov 1843 at age 26. 
Birth of Son20 Oct 1847 His son William Henry Griffin was born on 20 Oct 1847 at Lafayette, Chambers Co., Alabama
Death*30 Mar 1895 He died at Clay Co., Alabama, on 30 Mar 1895 at age 78. 
Burial* His body was interred at Old Lineville City Cemetery, Lineville, Clay Co., Alabama.1 
Biography* In an entry for a grandson, James O. Griffin on p. 253 of Vol 2 of the 1927 edition of the History of Alabama and Her People published by the American Historical Society, Inc., Robert Griffin "in middle life" moved from Pike Co, GA to Lineville, AL "where he engaged in farming and merchandising until his death." 

Family

Mary Ann Wise (5 Apr 1825 - 26 Jan 1905)
Marriage*23 Nov 1843 He married Mary Ann Wise at Pike Co., Georgia, on 23 Nov 1843 at age 26. 
Child
Last Edited5 Jul 2004

Citations

  1. Clay County Alabama Historical Society, Cemeteries of Clay County, Alabama, La Grange, GA: Family Tree, 1987.
    p 224.

William Henry Griffin

Male, #11454, (20 Oct 1847 - 21 Feb 1924)
Father*Robert Lee Griffin (18 Jan 1817 - 30 Mar 1895)
Mother*Mary Ann Wise (5 Apr 1825 - 26 Jan 1905)
Birth*20 Oct 1847 William was born at Lafayette, Chambers Co., Alabama, on 20 Oct 1847. 
Census*1850 He listed as son(s) in the census report at Chambers Co., Alabama, in 1850. 
Census20 Aug 1860 He was listed as a resident in the census report at Lafayette P.O., Chambers Co., Alabama, on 20 Aug 1860. 
Civil War*between 1864 and 1865 He served in the War Between the States between 1864 and 1865

     Billie served as a private in Company D, 3rd Alabama State Troops.1 
Marriage*24 Oct 1867 He married Clarissa Eugenia Culpepper at near Pinckneyville, Clay Co., in||, Tallapoosa Co., Alabama, on 24 Oct 1867 at age 20. 
Photographed*circa 1870 He was photographed circa 1870 at Good Hope (near Lineville), Clay Co., Alabama.2
Wm. H. & Clarissa (Culpepper) Griffin with daughter Dora
Birth of Son30 Jan 1871 His son James Olin Griffin was born on 30 Jan 1871 at Good Hope (near Lineville), Clay Co., Alabama
Birth of Son27 Sep 1872 His son Robert Lewis Griffin was born on 27 Sep 1872 at Good Hope (near Lineville), Clay Co., Alabama
Birth of Son11 May 1876 His son John Thomas Griffin was born on 11 May 1876 at Good Hope (near Lineville), Clay Co., Alabama
Birth of Son20 Jul 1880 His son Joseph Albertus Griffin was born on 20 Jul 1880 at Good Hope (near Lineville), Clay Co., Alabama
Birth of Son6 Jun 1882 His son George William Griffin was born on 6 Jun 1882 at Good Hope (near Lineville), Clay Co., Alabama
Birth of Son12 Feb 1889 His son Herman Milton Griffin was born on 12 Feb 1889 at Good Hope (near Lineville), Clay Co., Alabama
Photographed*say 1890 He was photographed say 1890 at Lineville, Clay Co., Alabama.3
William Henry Griffin
Death of Son3 Jun 1890 His son Herman Milton Griffin died on 3 Jun 1890 at Clay Co., Alabama
Death of Father30 Mar 1895 His father Robert Lee Griffin died on 30 Mar 1895 at Clay Co., Alabama
Death of Mother26 Jan 1905 His mother Mary Ann Wise died on 26 Jan 1905 at Clay Co., Alabama
Photographedsay 1920 He was photographed say 1920 at Clay Co., Alabama
Death of Son23 Jun 1922 His son John Thomas Griffin died on 23 Jun 1922 at Lineville, Clay Co., Alabama
Death*21 Feb 1924 He died at Olive Branch, Clay Co., Alabama, on 21 Feb 1924 at age 76. 
Burial*23 Feb 1924 His body was interred on 23 Feb 1924 at Old Lineville City Cemetery, Lineville, Clay Co., Alabama.4 
Biography* Census: 1870 Coppermine P.O., Clay Co., AL. \p. 236 (Wm. H. Griffin 22 AL $100 real estate)\ Census: 1880 Lineville, Clay Co., AL. \p. 3 #20 (W. H. Griffin 32 AL NC GA)\ Census: 1900 Clay Co., AL. \(William Griffin Oct 1847 AL)\
      According to an entry for his son, James O. Griffin, on p. 253 of Vol. 2 of the 1927 edition of the History of Alabama and Her People published by the American Historical Society, Inc., William Henry Griffin grew up in Chambers Co., AL and then moved to Clay Co., AL where he farmed in Lineville until 1920 and then moved to another farm near Ashland, AL. "He was a democrat, held office of the Justice of the Peace for many years, and at the time of his death was a member of the Clay County Board of Education. He belonged to the Missionary Baptist Church and the Knights of Pythais...." Mrs. J. W. (Lena Whatley) DeVaughn wrote 4 Dec 1978: Granddaddy Griffin was a man of medium height with brown eyes and hair. He was secretary at his church for 50 years or more. Also, he served as Justice of the Peace for at least 50 years. Was Chairman of the Board of Education for Clay County for 35 years. He was a very active democrat. He was a carpenter and a farmer. He grew all varieties of fruit and shared it with friends. Also, he served in the Civil War.
      Mrs. DeVaughn continued in a 2 Jan 1979 letter: Grandpa Griffin as far back as I can remember at church never sat on a bench at church. He always sat on the edge of the pulpit, leaned back against the wall of the church. The church was one large room. The men sat on one side of the pulpit on benches but he didn't.... The women sat on the other side of the pulpit. I can just see in my mind Grandpa sitting there.
      William Henry Griffin and Clarissa Culpepper began recording family records in a Bible. The Bible was published in 1870 by the National Publishing Company, Ziegler & McCurdy, Jones Brothers & Co., M. A. Parker & Co. In 1966, the Bible was in the possession of James M. Griffin and Ruth V. Griffin of Memphis Tennessee. The following is from Peter A. Brannon, Director of the State of Alabama Department of Archives and History in Montgomery, AL: William Henry Griffin... was living in Clay County in 1907-1908, and he certified to the tax collector there that he served as a private in Company D, 3rd Alabama State Troops; that he enlisted, 27 September, at Selma and was paroled 11 April 1865 at Selma. He further certified that he was born, 20 October 1847, in Chambers County, LaFayette, Alabama. His post office in 1907 was Lineville.
      A grandson, James M. Griffin, wrote that he was about 12 years old when his grandfather died: The last I remember of him before his death was a time when I was there and he was chopping stove wood. He was a farmer, carpenter, Justice of Peace, member of the school board, politician, a life long democrat, and at one time had some kind of a mine.
      According to the Certificate of Death, File No. 9869, W. H. Griffin died 21 Feb 1924 at 9:00 p.m. of Lobar Pneumonia. The doctor had been treating the pneumonia since 16 Feb. The following obituary is from an unknown source: W. H. Griffin, Prominent Citizen of the County Dead W. H. Griffin, Chairman of the County Board of Education, died at his home in the Olive Branch community between Ashland and Lineville Thursday night. He was one of the county's most highly esteemed citizens, his usefulness being recognized, in affairs of church and state. He was 76 years of age and was a veteran of the war between the states. In 1867 Mr. Griffin was married to Miss Eugenia Culpepper who still survives him. To them were born a large family of children, nine of whom are now living. They're Mrs. W. T. Dean, of Ashland; Mr. J. O. Griffin, of Eclectic; R. L. Griffin, of Montevallo; Mrs. Ike Reeves, of Lineville; Bert Griffin, of Birmingham; G. W. Griffin of Washington, D, C; Mrs. Robert Whatley and Misses Lela and Maude Griffin of Lineville. Funeral services were held at Lineville Baptist church Saturday morning and a very large congregation attended. Interment was in the Lineville cemetery. In Memory of W. H. Griffin The Death Angel has again visited Camp Pettus, this time claiming as his victim our beloved Lieutenant, W. H. Griffin. In the still hours of the night he came and stole his breath away and our comrade was left a lifeless lump of clay, but we feel proud to know he was found on guard and at his post of duty, both as a citizen and soldier, watching and waiting for the roll call. We mourn his departure, but are comforted with the thought that he has a better place on the other side with those that have gone on before. Sleep on dear comrade and we will try to live so as to be like you when our names are called to be at our post, and, like ex-President Wilson, to say "Ready." To his wife and children: you have the sympathy of Camp Pettus and we commend you to the loving care of Him who cares for His own. Trust in Him and lean on His promises for He promises to be a father to the fatherless and a husband to the widow. Farewell brother comrade till we meet you in the sweet by and by. Turner Wright, Secretary, Camp Pettus.
      Mrs. Charles (Margaret Whatley) Lee wrote in a 5 Mar 1979 letter that "the old [Lineville City Cemetery] is across from the old high school at Lineville... west of town." 

Family

Clarissa Eugenia Culpepper (13 Apr 1848 - 29 Nov 1947)
Marriage*24 Oct 1867 He married Clarissa Eugenia Culpepper at near Pinckneyville, Clay Co., in||, Tallapoosa Co., Alabama, on 24 Oct 1867 at age 20. 
Children
Last Edited14 May 2019

Citations

  1. State of Alabama Department of Archives and History Montgomery, AL.
  2. Ellaree Dean Speer records, Ellaree Dean Speer to Lew Griffin, 1977-1994.
    This photo is from the collection of Ellaree (Dean) Speer, daughter of William Thomas Dean and Dora Griffin.
  3. Joe Inzer Griffin, Irondale, AL.
  4. Clay County Alabama Historical Society, Cemeteries of Clay County, Alabama, La Grange, GA: Family Tree, 1987.
    p 217 and obituary.

Mary Ann Wise

Female, #11455, (5 Apr 1825 - 26 Jan 1905)
Birth*5 Apr 1825 Mary was born at Oglethorpe Co., Georgia, on 5 Apr 1825. 
Marriage*23 Nov 1843 She married Robert Lee Griffin at Pike Co., Georgia, on 23 Nov 1843 at age 18. 
Married Name23 Nov 1843  As of 23 Nov 1843, her married name was Griffin. 
Birth of Son20 Oct 1847 Her son William Henry Griffin was born on 20 Oct 1847 at Lafayette, Chambers Co., Alabama
Death of Spouse30 Mar 1895 Her husband Robert Lee Griffin died on 30 Mar 1895 at Clay Co., Alabama
Death*26 Jan 1905 She died at Clay Co., Alabama, on 26 Jan 1905 at age 79. 
Burial* Her body was interred at Old Lineville City Cemetery, Lineville, Clay Co., Alabama.1 
Biography* Mrs. Ellaree Dean Speer wrote in a September 1991 letter: Mamma [Eldora Griffin] went to Lineville to school and stayed with her Grandparents, Robert and Mary Ann Wise Griffin, and she really loved her Grandma Mary Ann & said she had the best disposition & smooth temper & her husband thought she was perfect, said she was a wonderful cook - if her biscuits were too hard, he softened them with butter, if they were too soft, he hardened them with butter. 

Family

Robert Lee Griffin (18 Jan 1817 - 30 Mar 1895)
Marriage*23 Nov 1843 She married Robert Lee Griffin at Pike Co., Georgia, on 23 Nov 1843 at age 18. 
Child
Last Edited5 Jul 2004

Citations

  1. Clay County Alabama Historical Society, Cemeteries of Clay County, Alabama, La Grange, GA: Family Tree, 1987.
    p 224.

Clarissa Eugenia Culpepper1

Female, #11456, (13 Apr 1848 - 29 Nov 1947)
Father*Rev. Lewis Peek Culpepper (25 Aug 1816 - 4 Jun 1915)
Mother*Sarah Ann Culpepper (21 Nov 1817 - 29 Mar 1858)
Birth*13 Apr 1848 Clarissa was born at Zebulon, Pike Co., Georgia, on 13 Apr 1848. 
1850 Census1 Jun 1850 Clarissa, Martha, Sarah, Sylviah, Joseph and Sarah listed as a household member living with Rev. Lewis Peek Culpepper on the 1850 Census on 1 Jun 1850 at Pike Co., Georgia.2 
Death of Mother29 Mar 1858 Her mother Sarah Ann Culpepper died on 29 Mar 1858 at Pike Co., Georgia.3 
Census19 Sep 1860 She was listed as a resident in the census report at Wesobulga, Randolph Co., Alabama, on 19 Sep 1860. 
Marriage*24 Oct 1867 She married William Henry Griffin at near Pinckneyville, Clay Co., in||, Tallapoosa Co., Alabama, on 24 Oct 1867 at age 19. 
Married Name24 Oct 1867  As of 24 Oct 1867, her married name was Griffin. 
Photographed*circa 1870 She was photographed circa 1870 at Good Hope (near Lineville), Clay Co., Alabama.4
Wm. H. & Clarissa (Culpepper) Griffin with daughter Dora
Census1870 She was listed as a resident in the census report at Coppermine P.O., Clay Co., Alabama, in 1870. 
Birth of Son30 Jan 1871 Her son James Olin Griffin was born on 30 Jan 1871 at Good Hope (near Lineville), Clay Co., Alabama
Birth of Son27 Sep 1872 Her son Robert Lewis Griffin was born on 27 Sep 1872 at Good Hope (near Lineville), Clay Co., Alabama
Birth of Son11 May 1876 Her son John Thomas Griffin was born on 11 May 1876 at Good Hope (near Lineville), Clay Co., Alabama
Birth of Son20 Jul 1880 Her son Joseph Albertus Griffin was born on 20 Jul 1880 at Good Hope (near Lineville), Clay Co., Alabama
Birth of Son6 Jun 1882 Her son George William Griffin was born on 6 Jun 1882 at Good Hope (near Lineville), Clay Co., Alabama
Birth of Son12 Feb 1889 Her son Herman Milton Griffin was born on 12 Feb 1889 at Good Hope (near Lineville), Clay Co., Alabama
Photographed*say 1890 She was photographed say 1890 at Lineville, Clay Co., Alabama.5
Clarissa Eugenia (Culpepper) Griffin
Death of Son3 Jun 1890 Her son Herman Milton Griffin died on 3 Jun 1890 at Clay Co., Alabama
Death of Father4 Jun 1915 Her father Rev. Lewis Peek Culpepper died on 4 Jun 1915 at Chambers Co., Alabama.6 
Death of Son23 Jun 1922 Her son John Thomas Griffin died on 23 Jun 1922 at Lineville, Clay Co., Alabama
Death of Spouse21 Feb 1924 Her husband William Henry Griffin died on 21 Feb 1924 at Olive Branch, Clay Co., Alabama
Photographedcirca 1938 She was photographed circa 1938 at Lineville, Clay Co., Alabama,
Left to right: Robert Lewis Griffin, Clarissa Culpepper Griffin, Mary Claire Griffin Jelin with son Griffin Zola Jelin.7
Robert Lewis Griffin with mother, daughter, and grandson
Death of Son9 Mar 1945 Her son Robert Lewis Griffin died on 9 Mar 1945 at Glendale, Los Angeles Co., California
Death*29 Nov 1947 She died at Ashland, Clay Co., Alabama, on 29 Nov 1947 at age 99. 
Burial* Her body was interred at Old Lineville City Cemetery, Lineville, Clay Co., Alabama.8 
Research note*3 Jun 2010 From: Eloise [mailto:eloisesamuels@centurytel.net]
Sent: Thursday, June 03, 2010 8:58 AM

Dear Lew,
Yes, I remember all about the house and surrounding property, including the barn, old garage for Aunt Maude's buggy, storage house and smoke house and best of all a "double seat out- house"!!!!
This will take awhile for me to describe, but I will be happy to share my precious memories. We were there once each week as long as she lived and yes, I remember Aunt Lelia WELL. She was an excellent cook and always had the best "tea cakes" you've ever tasted. Aunt Maude was a great cook as well. Elaine and I always looked forward to the summers because we enjoyed an entire week at their sweet modest little home. Aunt Lelia planted a huge garden and their fruit trees were bountiful, which she allowed us to participate in preserving everything available. Her peaches, apples, pears and grapes were the best......oh, and the many fig bushes, plus the mouth-watering strawberries! Just for the sake of keeping an oddity, they had two Quince trees across the winding little dirt road. Flowers, for every season, adorned the entire place and especially around the house. The front yard was small and practically in the road with a tiny little mailbox surrounded by petunias. The back yard was well groomed by the hands of Aunt Lelia who meticulously swept it weekly with a broom made of oak limbs.If a sprig of grass were detected, a sharp- blade- hoe took care of it immediately . Now you must remember that the standard attire for all three ladies was long skirts, as well as long underskirts, long sleeves (usually dresses were always made by the same pattern with white collars), long black stockings and black low heel shoes. All clothes, table cloths, napkins, scarves and curtains were heavily starched with Grandmother's homemadeconcoction of ingredients. Spotless was an understatement for the interior as well as exterior.
As for thestructural appearance, it was a unique OLD house built with hard pine wood. Everyone parked in the back yard and the main entrance was the back door. Approaching the door, one 's eyes were captured by the manually dug well on the back porch and conveniently located to do the family laundry (each Monday morning and you have already envisioned the wire clothes line near the house) The house faced north and south and on the east side, there was a large room that extended the length of the house with small high windows. This was Grandmother and Aunt Lelia's room , which actually would accommodate four people. Each bed was neatly covered with white chenille bedspreads. Aunt Maude's room was on the front side of the house joining a small living room, which we referredto as her library. Having taught school for many years, she had accumulated numerous children's books that Elaine and I were allowed to sit quietly and properly to read. When entering the house by rear entrance, after passing the porch, the aroma from the kitchendirected your nose to the next room, which was the dining room and "sitting room" for everyone. The extended dining room table seated six and even eight on occasions. A huge fireplace was located in this room and Grandmother's old leather and oak trimmed chair occupied the corner by the fireplace. Since she could not hear well at all, plus blind in one eye, we each knew our seating arrangement near her, which was a circlein the following order: Mama sat first, Elaine second, Eloise third, Daddy fourth, Aunt Lelia fifth and Aunt Maude sixth unless she was in her room preparing for school. We sat very quietly, listened carefully and knelt at her chair if she were speaking directly. She and Mama were excellent seamstresses and Grandmother wanted to feel and make every effort to examine our clothes. Unlimited respect was shared between her and my Daddy because both were "business-minded and honorable." Aunt Lelia was lots of fun and always gave us tea cakes wrapped in a starched white cloth as we were leaving....

Love to you,
Eloise. 
Biography*11 Feb 2019 Clarissa Eugenia Culpepper was the youngest of her mother Sarah's five children. Her father recorded her birth in his Bible: "Clarrisa E. Culpepper was born April the 13th 1848." Clarasy, as she was called, was eight when her mother died, ten when her father remarried, and eleven when her family moved to Randolph Co. AL.

In 1867 she married William Henry Griffin of Mellow Valley, AL at her home in Pinckneyville, Clay Co., AL (the marriage is recorded in Tallapoosa Co.) The couple settled in Lineville, Clay Co. AL to raise a family of ten children (one other died as an infant.) An early photograph shows a young Clarissa and her husband with their first child, Dora. Clarissa had blue eyes.

A granddaughter, Mrs. J. W. (Lena Whatley) DeVaughn wrote, 4 Dec 1978: With reference to Grandmother Griffin, I consider her to be an outstanding individual. She was faithful to her church and always ready to help those in need. She set a wonderful example for her children and grandchildren. I am so thankful for the things she taught me when I stayed with them [the William Henry Griffin's].... Grandmother Griffin... became deaf in ... later years. She was tall and slender and very energetic. Older age did not affect her posture. She had beautiful blue eyes.

Another granddaughter, Mrs. J. A. (Mildred Whatley) Kerley, wrote in a 23 Nov 1978 letter that she remembered her grandmother as "a very gracious person in her home. She was a great cook and I so enjoyed her good food."

Mrs. Charles (Margaret Whatley) Lee, a granddaughter, wrote in a 14 Oct 1978 letter: I always remember her [Clarissa] as being very hard of hearing and she only had one eye. She got one of her eyes [her right eye based on later photographs] put out making lye soap when she was in her 20's. She always had rheumatism bad, which is called arthritis now. Aunt Maude and Aunt Lelia never married and they lived with her and did most all the work. She was a very proud person, very stern, and had little patience for wrong doing of any kind. She believed in being on the up & up in a big way. She used to come to my mother's house and spend the day quite often. She would come in the buggy. She always brought candy or something. She always had good cakes, etc. cooked when we visited her and would fix our favorite dishes.

A great-granddaughter, Mrs. G. W. (Elaine DeVaughn) Mendenhall wrote in an 8 Feb 1979 letter that Clarissa "had quite a reputation as a stern disciplinarian." Jokes were told about her telling her son Olin that he was "not too old to whip" when he was himself a grandfather several times over.

Emyl Griffin recounted his memories of his grandmother in a 1 Oct 1994 letter:

MEMORIES OF MY GRAND MOTHER

CLARISSA EUGENIA GRIFFIN

BY: EMYL GRIFFIN After my fathers death in 1922 when I was four years of age my mother carried my brother and me to visit our grand mother Griffin at regular intervals perhaps every month or so. One of my memories [is] that she would always have Aunt Maude and Aunt Lelia get us something to eat such as cake, cookies, pie & etc. This was a practice until I finished high school. She was handicapped by eye sight from my first memory and later her general health declined. She was seventy years of age when I was born so I did not know her when she was completely active physically. I do remember her mind was clear until the very last years of her life. Another memory of her is the reunions held yearly as I recall beginning in the early years [of] my life until she was some 90 years of age. As I remember it came to the point that crowds somewhat bothered her so the reunions were discontinued and family members visited her at different times. The four living boys lived elsewhere out of Clay County, therefore, these reunions provided us the opportunity of seeing uncles, aunts and cousins that we would not see otherwise. Another memory of grandmother (and Aunt Maude) was the 1927 touring Ford car which Uncle Will drove down in from Washington, D. C. He and his brother-in-law had a Ford agency in D. C. He taught Aunt Maude to drive the car and she continued to drive it for some 50 years. I remember it was the talk of the community in the 1950's when most model T Fords had gone to the junk yard. A Dr. Owens, their family doctor in prior years, then living in Birmingham, bought the car, had it refurbished and carried it to antique car shows for a number of years. This Memory shows a loving heart in my grand mother. When I graduated from high school in 1936 she gave me money to buy a suit of clothes. I well remember this was the first suit of clothes that I had. With our family, especially during depression years, financial resources were limited, as was true with most families. She must have been aware of this, and, too, I always thought maybe she thought of me in a special way since my father died when I was so young. Anyway I remember my mother carried me to her uncle's store and we bought a double breasted solid grey suit. This suit lasted me through my college days and until I found employment.

Clarissa preferred the "old ways" to modern conveniences such as electric lights. The following article about her 99th birthday is from an unknown source, possibly the Birmingham News-Age-Herald: MRS. W. H. GRIFFIN HONORED ON 99th BIRTHDAY Relatives and friends gathered at the home of Mrs. W. H. Griffin on Ashland, Route 1, on Sunday, April 13th, to honor her on the occasion of her 99th birthday. Mrs. Griffin was born in Pike County, Georgia in 1848; moved with her parents to Alabama at the age of 11, later removing to Clay County where she has resided for the past 80 years. She was married in October, 1867. Her husband died in 1924. Mrs. Griffin is the mother of eleven children, seven of whom are now living, they are: Mrs. W. T. Dean of Ashland, Dr. J. O. Griffin of Memphis, Tenn; Mrs. Ike Reeves of Lineville; J. A. Griffin of Sylacauga; G. W. Griffin of Lineville; Mrs. Robert Whatley of Lineville and Miss Maude Griffin, who resides with her mother, all of whom were present. She also has 31 grandchildren and 33 great great grandchildren. Although Mrs. Griffin's eyesight, is dimmed and her hearing is somewhat impaired, she is seemingly in the best of health and does her part in the work about the house. Her father, the late Rev. L. P. Culpepper, was 98 years of age at the time of his death. At the noon hour a fine luncheon was served. Pictures were made during the afternoon. The honoree received many useful gifts. Other relatives and friends present were Mr. W. T. Dean of Ashland, Mrs. E. A. Speer of Birmingham, E. G. Dean of Ashland, Otho Dean of Oak Hill, Miss Annie Maude Dean, of Montgomery, Mr. and Mrs. Flora Griffin and C. M. Mason of Sylacauga; Mrs. J. W. Griffin, Mrs. J. T. Griffin and son, Emil [Emyl], Robert Whatley, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Vaughn and daughters, Misses Eloise and Elaine, Mrs. Mattie Reeves, W. L. Bell, De Hurst and Arnold Clark of Lineville; Mr. and Mrs. Charnell Middlecoff of Memphis, Tenn; Rev. J. W. Dean and son, Aubrey, of Cragford; Mrs. and Mrs. Billy Walker of Anniston, and Bill Street of Ashland
      Clarissa Culpepper Griffin remained active to within a few months of her 100th birthday, but died before reaching that goal after breaking her hip in a fall in 1947. The following obituary is from p. 14B of the Birmingham News-Age-Herald for Sunday, 30 Nov 1947: Woman Nearly 100 Succumbs; Son-In-Law Dies Soon After Ashland, Ala. Dec. [Nov.] 29--Mrs. W. H. Griffin who would have celebrated her 100th birthday next April 13 and her son-in-law, W. T. Dean, 77, died here Saturday morning after short illnesses. Joint funeral services will be held at 2 p. m. Sunday at Ashland First Baptist Church. Mrs. Griffin will be buried in Lineville, while Mr. Dean will be buried here, Blair directing. Mrs. Griffin died about 3 a. m. Saturday, her son-in-law several hours later. Mrs. Griffin was honored at a luncheon and received many gifts as she celebrated her 99th birthday last April. Although Mrs. Griffin['s] eyesight became dimmed and her hearing somewhat impaired, she was active and assisted in work about the home in advanced years. BORN IN PIKE COUNTY, Georgia, Mrs. Griffin moved to Alabama with her family at the age of 11. She had lived in Clay County the last 80 years. Mr. Griffin, whom she married in 1867, died in 1924. Mrs. Griffin was the mother of 11 children, seven of whom survive her. There are three sons, Dr. J. O. Griffin, Memphis; G. W. Griffin, Lineville and J. A. Griffin, Sylacauga, and four daughters, Mrs. W. T. Dean and Miss Maude Griffin, Ashland and Mrs. Ike Reeves and Mrs. Robert Whatley, Lineville. Also surviving are 34 grandchildren and 33 great-grandchildren. Mr. Dean, a retired farmer, is survived by his widow; two daughters, Annie Maude Dean, Montgomery, and Mrs. E. A. Spear, Birmingham; two sons, Otho Dean, of Montgomery and Oak Hill, and Edward Dean, Butler, Pa. and four grandchildren.

A granddaughter, Mrs. Charles (Margaret Whatley) Lee wrote 21 Jan 1990 about some pictures of Good Hope from the Lineville paper of 20 Jan 1990: You see the church? Well that's the church Grandmother and Granddaddy Griffin attended and all their children.... They have remodeled the church in recent years. They added the little steeple, the little porch & also put siding on the outside. Grandmother's children went to school there too. That headstone hasn't always been there. That church must have been there be before 1884. Every one of Grandmother's children was born there in Good Hope. You see the house in the lower right corner? Well I'm familiar with that house, you go on around that house to go to Grandmother's old home place. I doubt if it is still[ standing there. It was almost impossible to get to their home in a car the road was so rocky & rough.... I think the road going to the left in the picture goes to Pyriton.

In a 12 Apr 1990 letter Margaret Lee added: Mildred [(Whatley) Kerley] drove down by grandmother Griffin's home place between Lineville & Ashland. The house is very old. No one lives in it, looks like it's about ready to fall in. 

Family

William Henry Griffin (20 Oct 1847 - 21 Feb 1924)
Marriage*24 Oct 1867 She married William Henry Griffin at near Pinckneyville, Clay Co., in||, Tallapoosa Co., Alabama, on 24 Oct 1867 at age 19. 
Children
ChartsBenjamin (son of Joseph) Culpepper of Edgecombe Co., NC: Descendant Chart
John Culpepper of Randolph Co, AL: Descendant Chart
LWG / Clarissa Eugenia Culpepper Griffin (Lew Griffin's gtgm): Ancestral Chart
Last Edited14 May 2019

Citations

  1. Clarissa's middle name, Eugenia, was from Queen Victoria Eugenia of England.
  2. 1850 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 125, District 68, Pike Co., GA
    Lewis P. Culpepper, 33, M, Mill Wright, $400, SC
    Sarah A. Culpepper, 32, F, SC
    Joseph R. Culpepper, 9, M, GA
    Silviah A. Culpepper, 8, F, GA
    Sarah E. Culpepper, 6, F, GA
    Martha J. Culpepper, 4, F, GA
    Clarissy E. Culpepper, 2, F, GA
    Robert A. Vaughn, 6, M, GA
    Nancy Nabors, 76, F, SC.
  3. Pike Co. Cemetery Records, Unpublished.
    Vol 1 p 505 13 May 1858 issue.
  4. Ellaree Dean Speer records, Ellaree Dean Speer to Lew Griffin, 1977-1994.
    This photo is from the collection of Ellaree (Dean) Speer, daughter of William Thomas Dean and Dora Griffin.
  5. Joe Inzer Griffin, Irondale, AL.
  6. Tombstone.
  7. Ancestry.com, Public Member Trees.
  8. Clay County Alabama Historical Society, Cemeteries of Clay County, Alabama, La Grange, GA: Family Tree, 1987.
    p 217.

Minnie Dallas Strickland

Female, #11457, (26 Oct 1877 - 19 Jun 1950)
Father*Henry Ansel Strickland (17 Mar 1844 - 17 Aug 1914)
Mother*Julia Ann Halsey (15 Oct 1846 - 21 Sep 1887)
Birth*26 Oct 1877 Minnie was born at Standing Rock, Chambers Co., Alabama, on 26 Oct 1877. 
Death of Mother21 Sep 1887 Her mother Julia Ann Halsey died on 21 Sep 1887 at Chambers Co., Alabama
Photographed*say 1900 She was photographed say 1900 at Chambers Co., Alabama.1
Minnie Dallas Strickland
Marriage*16 May 1900 She married James Olin Griffin at Standing Rock, Chambers Co., Alabama, on 16 May 1900 at age 22.2 
Married Name16 May 1900  As of 16 May 1900, her married name was Griffin. 
Birth of Son6 Mar 1904 Her son Joseph Wyeth Griffin was born on 6 Mar 1904 at Hackneyville, Tallapoosa Co., Alabama
Census*1910 She was listed as a resident in the census report at Hackneyville, Tallapoosa Co., Alabama, in 1910. 
Birth of Son1 Jun 1913 Her son James Maurice Griffin was born on 1 Jun 1913 at Hackneyville, Tallapoosa Co., Alabama
Death of Father17 Aug 1914 Her father Henry Ansel Strickland died on 17 Aug 1914 at Chambers Co., Alabama
Birth of Son6 Oct 1915 Her son Lewis Wyman Griffin was born on 6 Oct 1915 at Hackneyville, Tallapoosa Co., Alabama
Death*19 Jun 1950 She died at Memphis, Shelby Co., Tennessee, on 19 Jun 1950 at age 72. 
Burial* Her body was interred at Memorial Park Cemetery, Memphis, Shelby Co., Tennessee
Biography* Mrs. C. W. (Marie Griffin) Middlecoff wrote in a 13 Feb 1995 letter: Mama was such a lady. She had a reputation of being an excellent cook. We think she was the best She was a quiet person, read her Bible + studied her Sunday School lesson each week. She would ask us if we had studied ours, especially Ralph [Vaughn] when he was here. Sometimes Ralph would ask her first - for fun. He is a big tease. She loved her family and home. She preferred staying at home except attending church. She was my Sunday School teacher when I was 11. She was active in PTA - mainly telephoning + attending meetings - not presiding as an officer. She had several operations including the removal of her right breast (cancer). It didn't spread. She died about 10 years later (Coronary Thrombosis). She would be an encourager to other women who had the same surgery (cancer). They would call her. Then she would tell them how to get back to "normal." She didn't talk about her childhood. Her mother died when she (Mama) was about 7 years old. Aunt Lanora (her oldest sister + her twin (died young, can't think of her name [Derah])) took care of her. She had sisters named Ollie and Peggy. Julius and Lewis were 2 of her brothers. Her father farmed. They had a nice white framed house. Ruth, James (a baby) (1914) and Mama rode the train to visit her father + those at their home. Aunt Lanora was still unmarried and living there. Aunt Peggy would come and stay with us for a while. SHe would help Mama sew. They made us some pretty dresses. She also took me to pick up hickory nuts - Then cracked + picked the nuts out of the sshell for me to eat. Several years later she married a widower with several children.
      The following obituary is from an unknown source: Mrs. J. O. Griffin Mrs. Minnie Strickland Griffin, wife of Dr. J. O. Griffin, on the staff at Oakville Sanatorium, died at 12:10 a.m. today at her home, 883 Hawthorne. Mrs. Griffin fell and broke her him several months ago and had never recovered from the effects of the fall. She was 72. She was born in Chambers County, Ala., moving to Memphis from Moulton, Ala., in 1928. A member of McLean Baptist Church, Mrs. Griffin was active in the Women's Missionary Society there. She leaves six daughters, [Mrs. R. W. Vaughn,] Mrs. H. M. Middlecoff Jr., and Miss Ruth Griffin, all of Memphis, Mrs. H. W. [read M.] Lewis, Quitman, Ga., Mrs. W. T. Duscoe, Union City, Tenn., and Mrs. Hez Brown, Chattanooga, Tenn; three sons, J. W. and L. W. Griffin, Leeds, Ala., and J. M. Griffin, Memphis; two sisters, Mrs. Mark Lane, Roanoke, Ala., and Mrs. G. C. Wright, Highland Home, Ala; and her brother, Lewis Strickland, Wichita Falls, Texas. Services at 10:30 a.m. tomorrow at McLean Baptist Church. The body will be at the church by 9:30 a.m. Burial in Memorial Park. National Funeral Home in charge. 

Family

James Olin Griffin (30 Jan 1871 - 31 Jul 1953)
Marriage*16 May 1900 She married James Olin Griffin at Standing Rock, Chambers Co., Alabama, on 16 May 1900 at age 22.2 
Children
Last Edited7 Jan 2019

Citations

  1. Correspondence from James Maurice Griffin, 883 Hawthorne, Memphis, TN, to Lew Griffin, 1960-1980's.
  2. Alburt Burton Moore, History of Alabama and Her People, Chicago, IL: American, Historical, Society, Inc., 1927.

James Olin Griffin

Male, #11458, (30 Jan 1871 - 31 Jul 1953)
Father*William Henry Griffin (20 Oct 1847 - 21 Feb 1924)
Mother*Clarissa Eugenia Culpepper (13 Apr 1848 - 29 Nov 1947)
Birth*30 Jan 1871 James was born at Good Hope (near Lineville), Clay Co., Alabama, on 30 Jan 1871. 
Employment* James's occupation: physician. 
Census*1880 He was in the in 1880 census at Lineville, Clay Co., Alabama
Photographed*say 1890 He was photographed say 1890 at Lineville, Clay Co., Alabama.1
James Olin Griffin
Marriage*16 May 1900 He married Minnie Dallas Strickland at Standing Rock, Chambers Co., Alabama, on 16 May 1900 at age 29.2 
Birth of Son6 Mar 1904 His son Joseph Wyeth Griffin was born on 6 Mar 1904 at Hackneyville, Tallapoosa Co., Alabama
Census1910 He was listed as a resident in the census report at Hackneyville, Tallapoosa Co., Alabama, in 1910. 
Birth of Son1 Jun 1913 His son James Maurice Griffin was born on 1 Jun 1913 at Hackneyville, Tallapoosa Co., Alabama
Birth of Son6 Oct 1915 His son Lewis Wyman Griffin was born on 6 Oct 1915 at Hackneyville, Tallapoosa Co., Alabama
Death of Father21 Feb 1924 His father William Henry Griffin died on 21 Feb 1924 at Olive Branch, Clay Co., Alabama
Death of Mother29 Nov 1947 His mother Clarissa Eugenia Culpepper died on 29 Nov 1947 at Ashland, Clay Co., Alabama
Death of Spouse19 Jun 1950 His wife Minnie Dallas Strickland died on 19 Jun 1950 at Memphis, Shelby Co., Tennessee
Death*31 Jul 1953 He died at Memphis, Shelby Co., Tennessee, on 31 Jul 1953 at age 82. 
Burial*2 Aug 1953 His body was interred on 2 Aug 1953 at Memorial Park Cemetery, Memphis, Shelby Co., Tennessee
Biography* James was named after his Uncle James Griffin. According to a son, James M. Griffin, James O. Griffin had blue eyes. Mrs. Charles (Margaret Whatley) Lee visited Alsie Rutland in LaGrange, GA and he spoke about James Olin Griffin: Alsie also said Uncle Olin used to teach at Standing Rock [Chambers Co., AL] and he knew him. Uncle Olin met Aunt Minnie at Standing Rock, as you know she was a Strickland. Uncle Olin boarded with her family when he taught there.
      The following biography is from Vol. 2, pp. 253-254 of the History of Alabama and Her People by the American Historical Society, Inc., 1927: JAMES OLIN GRIFFIN, M.D. The quarter of a century Doctor Griffin has devoted to his duties as a physician and surgeon has been spent in several Alabama localities, and includes also the period of about a year he was a medical officer in home camps and overseas during the World War period. Doctor Griffin is a physician and surgeon at Moulton. He was born at [Good Hope near] Lineville, Clay County, Alabama, January 31, 1871 [30 Jan 1871 per Griffin Bible record]. The Griffin family is of Welsh ancestry. His grandfather, Robert Griffin, was a native of Pike County, Georgia, and when in middle life moved with his family to Lineville, Alabama, where he engaged in farming and merchandising until his death. He married Ann Wise, a native of Georgia. Their son, William Henry Griffin, was born in Chambers county, Alabama, in October, 1847, and died at Ashland in Clay County, February 22, 1923. He grew up in Chambers County, was married in Clay County, and carried on successful operations as a farmer at Lineville until 1920, when he moved to another farm near Ashland. He was a democrat, held the office of justice of the peace many years, and at the time of his death was a member of the Clay County Board of Education. He belonged to the Missionary Baptist Church and the Knights of Pythias, and was one of the useful soldiers of the Confederacy during the Civil war. His wife, Clarissa Eugenia Culpepper, was born near Griffin in Pike County, Georgia, April 12, 1847 [13 Apr 1847 per Culpepper Bible Record and tombstone] and is still living. They had eleven children: Dora, wife of Bud Dean, a farmer at Ashland; Doctor James O; Robert Lewis, a commercial traveler, with home at Montevallo; Annie, wife of Isaac Reeves, a farmer at Lineville; J. Thomas, a farmer who died at Lineville of typhoid fever in June, 1922; Miss Lelia and Miss Maude, living at home with their mother; Joseph Albertus, who is credit man for the Haverty Furniture Company at Birmingham; George William, connected with the Handley Motor Company at Washington, D. C; Myrtle, wife of Robert Whatley, a farmer at Lineville; and Herman Milton, who died when eighteen months old. James O. Griffin grew up at Lineville, attended Lineville College, and had six years of teaching experience in Randolph and Clay counties. In 1898 he entered the medical department of the University of Alabama at Mobile, and was graduated M. D. in 1900. After six months of practice at Millerville he located at Hackneyville, in Tallapoosa County, and was an esteemed and successful physician in that community for a period of seventeen years. Leaving there he practiced at Goodwater, Alabama seven months. Having volunteered for service in the Army Medical Corps, he was commissioned a first lieutenant and was called to duty August 1, 1918 and was in training twenty-nine days at Camp Greenleaf Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia. He was ordered overseas as a casual landing at Liverpool September 29, spent five days at Winchester, England, reached Le Havre October 5, still as a casual, and was stationed at Laval Bonne, France from October 18 until January 6, 1919, being battalion surgeon of the First, Second and Third Battalions which were in training there. He then went to Nevers, France, with Bakery Company No. 320 remaining on duty there from January 6, 1919 to March 11, 1919. He was next at Mars Center, the American base hospital, until April 15th, was transferred to Savinay for a short time, and on April 20, sailed from St. Nazaire, landing at Hoboken New Jersey, May 1, 1919, and took his honorable discharge at Fort McPherson Atlanta, June 19, 1919. He now holds the rank of captain in the Medical Officers' Reserve Corps. Leaving the army, he resumed his practice at Goodwater for a brief time, and on January 2, 1922, engaged in practice at Leeds, left there on March 6, 1923, and was located at Eclectic until April 29, 1924, when he established his home and office at Moulton to engage in a general practice as a physician and surgeon. His offices are in the Moulton Drug Company Building on the Court house Square. Doctor Griffin was county health officer of Tallapoosa County in 1916-17 and is a member of the Lawrence County, Alabama State and Southern Medical Associations. He is a democrat, a member of the Missionary Baptist Church and is affiliated with Leeds Lodge No. 446, F. and A. M. Avondale Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, Kamram Grotto of Masons at Birmingham. He married at Standing Rock in Chambers County, May 16, 1900, Miss Minnie D. Strickland, daughter of Henry A. and Julia (Halsey) Strickland, now deceased. Her father was a farmer in Chambers County. Doctor and Mrs. Griffin became the parents of nine children: Mary Erom, a teacher in the Coffee County High School at Enterprise; Joseph Wyeth, manager of a general store at Leeds; Ruth Valentine, attending the Alabama College at Montevallo; Sarah Louise, a senior and Julia Clarise, a freshman in the Lawrence County High School at Moulton; James Maurice, Lewis Wyman and Millie Frances, students in the Moulton Grammar School; and Olga Marie.
      James O. Griffin helped to found a Baptist church which was destroyed by a cyclone in 1916. A daughter, Ruth Griffin, wrote in a 31 Jan 1982 letter that "quite well do I remember the cyclone. [Great?] Uncle Joe Culpepper was visiting us at that time. He visited with us quite often. We lived very close to the church. It was a scary time for a few moments." The following is from p. 4 of the ALEXANDER CITY OUTLOOK Thursday, 17 Dec 1981: July, 1916 cyclone destroyed Church Coosa-Tallapoosa Echoes By Hoot Warren A Cyclone has long been a much dreaded weather maker. It was from a cyclone which hit the Hackneyville Baptist Church building - destroying it - that the church membership also suffered a devastating blow. This storm came in July 1916 and completely demolished the building causing the Baptists to seek help from the Presbyterians in the community. The ALEXANDER CITY NEWS dated Friday July 14 1916 reported a storm "which had hit the entire southern part of the United States leaving some 78 persons dead or missing and damage estimated into the millions of dollars." They further recounted that Montgomery, Selma, Prattville and several locations in Mississippi had extensive storm damage and crop loss from excessive rains. They reported over "one hundred hours of continuous rainfall" during this wide and costly storm. The ALEXANDER CITY OUTLOOK of mid-July was not on file, so an account of the happening could not be gleaned from this active Alexander City newspaper of that day. The DADEVILLE SPOT CASH did note on July 21 1916 that six states were involved in the storm and that the dead and missing was over 75 persons. Damage was extensive but there was no specific mention of the Hackneyville church in any of the articles. Local records state that the church was lost July 15, 1916 in that siege of bad weather which spawned localized storms. The congregation held a meeting and decided to sell the remains of the church building and make letters available to members to join the church of their choice at some other location. The membership was quite large at the time but did not feel financially able to replace the building due to anticipated crop losses. The Baptist Church at Hackneyville had actually begun when Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Cosper sold an acre and a half of land to the church trustees for only one dollar. This action took place back on November 19, 1904 and involved Mr. D. M. Vernon, E. W. Harlan, and G. W. Holdridge as trustees. The land was just west of where Dr. J. O. Griffin lived on the south side of the main road through Hackneyville. The J. D. Collins family later lived in that home and still later the location became the Fox Store and then the Walls Store. But Dr. Griffin was an active man and believed in both schools and churches so he became the power behind the movement in 1905 to actually get a church organized and a building on that land. It soon became a reality and services were held until 1916....
      A niece Mrs. J. W. (Lena Whatley) DeVaughn wrote that she and her sister, Mrs. C. H. (Margaret Whatley) Lee went to La Grange, GA and visited "a Rutland [William Huey Rutland?]": He told me about Uncle Olin Griffin wanting him to go with him in the woods to catch some rattlesnakes. Did your Daddy tell you how Uncle Olin Griffin, your Grandfather, loved to work with snakes? When I was a child, my parents would visit Uncle Olin, he would show us his snakes. In his last years I don't think he did, but when young he sure did. I enjoyed listening while he (the Mr. Rutland) told how he caught the snakes, put them to sleep and cut the poison from them, then how they would fight each other when waking up.... Down there is where he [James Olin Griffin] met Aunt Minnie [Strickland] at County Line or she lived at Standing Rock. Uncle Olin was teaching school there when he met Aunt Minnie....
      J. O. Griffin also liked to go hunting and at one time had several bird dogs. Later, he had a pet dog named Jigs that he loved to aggravate by twirling its tail. J. O. Griffin was a teetotaler and he ran a telephone exchange out of his office. A niece, Mrs. E. A. (Ellaree Dean) Speer, wrote in a 10 Jan 1992 letter: Uncle Olin had a good practice in Hackneyville & also telephone business & he still had that when I would visit [Olin's daughter, Mary] Erom [Griffin] & we worked the switchboard for Miss Cassie to go for lunch... & to have vacation.... Those were horse & buggy days. The switchboard was in a two room house & the other room was for medicine. If you called late p.m. night or early morning - no answer. Miss Cassie went to work about 7:30 or 8:00.
      Annie M. Rillett, 17, was listed as a telephone operator living at the James O. Griffin residence in the 1910 census. The following is from Birmingham News for Sunday, 28 Nov 1982: A Day in the Life of Alabama Switchboards and 'Central' once hub of small-town life By Clarke Stallworth News associate editor They called her "Central." Early in this century, she sat in a little office, in a small Alabama town, watching the spaghetti-like cords sprout from the small telephone switchboard. She ate, slept and lived within reach of the switchboard, and many nights would be roused out of bed to connect somebody with somebody else. From 1900 to 1921, Alabama was dotted with small telephone exchanges. Irma Russell Cruse, who worked for Southern Bell and South Central Bell as a writer wrote a story in a telephone magazine about one early- century switchboard, in Hackneyville, a small town in northwestern Tallapoosa County. The switchboard began when a dentist, a Dr. Bell, needed it to stay in touch with his patients. So he bought a switchboard and set it up at home. His wife manipulated the cords and answered to "Central." Then Dr. J.O. Griffin put in a larger exchange--15 lines--with four to eight parties on each line. Toll connections were established between Hackneyville and the Bell Company's exchanges at Alexander City and Goodwater. In her article, "Horse and Buggy Telephones," Mrs. Cruse wrote: "For the next 10 or 15 years, this telephone switchboard was the hub around which life revolved in the community. The primary purpose of the service was to enable the doctor to keep in touch with his patients. "Merchants soon found it helpful, however, to use the telephone to find out whether their orders of staple groceries had come in at the Central of Georgia depot in Alexander City. "Each family learned its code ring and the youngest child soon learned that 'two longs and a short' was for his telephone. Each family learned the other codes which designated others on the line and when Mrs. Brown's short and long ring was heard, others up and down the line rushed to see who was calling Mrs. Brown. It never occurred to the telephone subscribers that anyone would seriously object to everyone on the line listening in on conversations. Nor was it unusual for listeners to take part in the conversation and volunteer information." Dr. Griffin hired a young telephone operator, Nellie Ledbetter, and the operator lived with him and his wife in their home. Wrote Mrs. Cruse: "One of the by-products of her working days for Nellie was the romance with Charlie Russell, one of the young men of the community who had been away at school. "The two young people found the switchboard offered opportunity for frequent visits by telephone when business was quiet and the romance blossomed into marriage. "During the months before that marriage took place, in her role of 'Central' Nellie served the doctors well (Nellie's brother was practicing with Dr. Griffin). "Each morning before leaving for their house calls, the doctors prepared a list of their proposed visits and left it at the switchboard. If a call came in for the doctors in their absence, Nellie would check the lists, estimate just about where she would find the doctor who was needed and ring the telephone nearest that location. "Any telephone subscriber was always glad to stop work to answer the telephone to help locate the doctor. There was little danger of missing the doctor if he was scheduled to come along past the house being called, for the clip clop of the team of horses could be heard long before the buggy and its occupant would come into sight. Telephones changed. The wall set, with the crank on the side, became a dial telephone on a desk, and "Central" became "Operator," in a distant city. Telephone service got better -- subscribers could make calls easier and quicker than before. But the personal touch -- or much of it -- disappeared into the mists of history. Americans may have gained better service, but some who remember, miss the friendly voice of the lady in the cushioned chair, sitting by the rickety little switchboard, the lady who knew everybody's business. The lady down at "Central."
      A daughter, Ruth Griffin, wrote in a 31 Jan 1982 letter: Yes, I remember living at Hackneyville and quite a lot about everything. Daddy was a very prominent citizen there.... Hackneyville was a very progressive community when we lived there. Daddy had the home built where we lived. It was destroyed by fire sometime ago.
      The following is from p. 421 of the second (1952) edition of Who's Important in Medicine compiled and published by Institute for Research in Biography, Inc., Hicksville, NY: GRIFFIN, JAMES OLIN - Physician; born January 30, 1871, [Good Hope near] Lineville, Alabama; son of William Henry and Clarissa Eugenia (Culpepper) Griffin; educated at Lineville College, Medical Dept. Grants Univ., Medical Dept., University of Alabama, M.D., 1900; married Minnie Dallas Strickland, May 16, 1900; children-Mary Erom, Joseph Wyeth, Ruth Valentine, Sarah Louise, Julia Clarice, James Maurice, Lewis Wyman, Minnie Frances, and Olga Marie. In general practice, Alabama 1900-1928.
County Health Officer, Tallapoosa Co., Ala., four years; President, Board of Education, Hackneyville, Ala., several years; Staff Member, U.S. Veterans Hospital 88, Memphis, Tennessee, 14 years; Staff Member, Oakville Memorial Sanatorium, Memphis, Tennessee since 1942. Member: Tenn. State Medical Association, American Trudeau Society, Memphis and Shelby County Medical Society, American Cancer Society. Clubs: Oakville Civic, American Legion, National Association of Retired Civil Employees. Served as First Lieutenant, U.S. Army, World War I; Major retired, U.S. Army Medical Corps. Residence: 883 Hawthorne. Office: Oakville Sanatorium, Memphis 18, Tennessee.
      In a 29 Jul 1953 letter written just 2 days before his death, James O. Griffin wrote to his son, Lewis W. Griffin and family: I am in charge of three different buildings and it takes lots of walking to see the patients in all three of the buildings.... I am very thankful that I have a good job and I hope that I can keep it for at least five more years. I do not want to ever quit work. I hope and pray that the Lord will keep me fit and able to work as long as I live. I think that work and employment is as good or better medicine for old people as it is for young people. A busy individual, if he or she has any ambition, is, as a rule, a happy individual.
      The following obituary is from The Commercial Appeal of Memphis, TN, Saturday 1 Aug 1953: SUDDEN ILLNESS FATAL TO DR. JAMES GRIFFIN Practiced More Than 50 Years In Tennessee, Alabama RITES TO BE TOMORROW More than a half century of medical practice that endeared Dr. James O. Griffin to the hearts of lay persons and other physicians in two states ended yesterday when the doctor died at Baptist Hospital after a sudden illness. He was 82. Dr. Griffin became ill at noon Thursday while on duty at Oakville Memorial Sanatorium, where he was still active as staff physician. He died at 9 yesterday morning. Rites Set Tomorrow Services will be he]d at 3:30 tomorrow afternoon at McLean Baptist Church. Dr. H. C. Gabhart will officiate. Burial will be in Memorial Park. Dr. Griffin's long and prominent career began with general practice in Tallapoosa County, Ala., in 1900. He had earned his doctor of medicine degree earlier that year from the University of Alabama. The year was notable in another respect for the young doctor, for it was then that he married Minnie Dallas Strickland of Roanoke, Ala. Mrs. Griffin died one month and three days after the couple celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on May 16, 1950. They raised nine children. During 28 years of general practice, Dr. Griffin also served as county health officer of Tallapoosa County for four years, and president of the board of education of Hackneyville, Ala. The family moved to Memphis in 1928 from Moulton, Ala. Their home is at 883 Hawthorne. With VA 14 Years Dr. Griffin's first service here was as staff physician at Veterans Hospital No. 88 on Crump, where he remained 14 years. He had been at Oakville Sanatorium the past 11 years. Born at [Good Hope near] Lineville, Ala., Dr. Griffin was the son of Mr. and Mrs. William Henry Griffin. He attended Lineville College and Grant's University, Chattanooga, before entering the University of Alabama. Dr. Griffin was a member of the American Medical Association, the Southern Medical Association, the Tennessee State Medical Association, American Trudeau Society, Memphis & Shelby County Medical Association, and the American Cancer Society. Following service with the Army Medical Corps in World War I, Dr. Griffin was discharged as a major. He was a member of the American Legion, Oakville Civic Club, and the National Association of Retired Civil Employees. Known As 'Pops' He was a member of McLean Baptist Church. He was known affectionate]y as 'Pops.' He leaves three sons, James Griffin of Memphis, and J. W. Griffin and L. W. Griffin of Leeds, Ala; six daughters, Mrs. R. W. Vaughn, Mrs. C. W. Middlecoff Jr., and Miss Ruth Griffin of Memphis, Mrs. Hez Brown of Chattanooga, Mrs. W. T. Duscoe of Union City, Tenn., and Mrs. H. M. Lewis of Quitman, Ga; two brothers, J. A. Griffin of Sylacauga, Ala.,and G. W. Griffin of Lineville; four sisters, Mrs. Ike Reeves and Mrs. Robert Whatley of Lineville, Miss Maude Griffin of Ashland, Alabama and Mrs. W. T. Dean of St. Petersburg, Fla., and 15 grandchildren.
      The following obituary is from an unknown source: Dr. James Griffin, Of Oakville, Dies Staff Physician At Sanitorium Dr. James O. Griffin of 883 Hawthorne, staff physician At Oakville Memorial Sanitorium, died at 9:10 a.m. today at Baptist Hospital after a brief illness. He was 82. Dr. Griffin came to Memphis 25 years ago from Alabama to join the staff of Veterans Hospital 88 on Lamar. He had been with Oakville Sanitorium for 12 years. He was born in Clay County, Ala. Jan 30, 1871. He graduated from Alabama Medical College in 1900 and first practiced in Tallapoosa County, Ala., where he became health officer. He served as a major with the Army Medical Corps in France in War I. After 28 years of practice in Alabama, the last five in Moulton, he came to Memphis in 1928. He was a member of Southern Medical Association, American Medical Association, American Trudeau Society, Oakville Civic Club, American Legion, and McLean Baptist Church. He leaves three sons, J. W. Griffin and L. W. Griffin of Leeds, Ala., and James Griffin of the Hawthorne address; six daughters, Mrs. H. M. Lewis of Quitman, Ga. Miss Ruth Griffin of the Hawthorne address, Mrs. R. W. Vaughn of 3234 Spottswood, Mrs. W. T. Duscoe of Union City, Tenn., Mrs. C. W. Middlecoff Jr. of 1547 N. Parkway and Mrs. Hez Brown of Chattanooga and 15 grandchildren. Services at 3 :30 p.m. tomorrow at McLean Baptist Church, Dr. H. C. Gabhart officiating. Burial in Memorial Park. National Funeral Home is in charge.

The following is from Dr. Mary R. Lewis, Houston, TX, 17 Sep 2004:

Dear Lew, as you requested, I'll start my recollections of Grandmother and Grandaddy Griffin. I may think of some others later. I'll include information provided by my Mother, aunts and uncles and others, who told me things about them from their experiences.

My own experiences that I can remember begin with the annual trips that Mother, Marian, and I made to Memphis to visit them. It was very important to my Mother that we spend at least two weeks every year with them as this was a source of great renewal for her and she wanted Marian and me to know our Griffin relatives. We never lived in the same community with them. In my earliest years, Daddy sometimes drove us there because Mother did not learn to drive until we lived in Rochelle, GA (about 1939). He never wanted to stay as long as Mother did. So, more frequently, we went on the train (the
"Frisco") from Montgomery. Sometimes we stayed a month. Mother talked often about how much she loved being with her family and at her Mother's dinner table. Dinner there was a special time. There was a precise hour when everyone in the family was supposed to be home for dinner and the conversation was always interesting as we discussed what people had been doing all day or other stimulating topics. Remember, Mother was the eldest of the Griffin siblings and so James, Lewis, Frances, and Marie were still in high school and college and living at home during my early years. Marian and I were the first grandchildren. Annette and Barbara, Julie and Jimmy were not far behind. Annette and Barbara lived in Memphis, so we usually saw them, too, when we visited. James, Lewis, Frances, and Marie always made me feel very special and took me everywhere with them and planned special treats for us, such as going to the Memphis zoo, the outdoor theater, the parks, etc. I remember watching James teach Marie (maybe Frances too) to drive. I don't think Grandaddy liked to drive. One of his children drove him to work and one always went to get him in the afternoon by the time I knew him. After dinner, he always took a walk and often I went with him and his dog, Jiggs, when I was there.

There was always lots of laughter in the Griffin home, at dinner time and all the time. Usually when we visited, there would be a time when all the girls were at home. The ones who lived elsewhere would make a special point of coming home at that time to see my Mother, Marian, and me. I have special memories of all six of them getting in one room, telling their stories, with peals of laughter.

Grandad and Grandmother were totally devoted to their children and grandchildren and interested in their joys and sorrows. I always received Christmas and birthday remembrances from them as a very young child. Here is one story about my stillborn brother told to me by Marie that I did not know until both of my parents had died, and so I never had a chance to discuss it with them. My parents lost their first baby, a stillborn boy. Marie said that Grandmother came to Wetumpka, AL with Frances and Marie (ages about 5 and 7 then) to stay with Mother for a whole month afterwards to provide comfort and solace. Marie said that, even at age 5, she knew that my Mother needed to talk about it and she wanted to find a way to help her talk about it, but didn't know how. (Perhaps Grandmother found a way.) I knew that this experience had been horrible for my Mother because she told me about it many times, although I don't remember her telling me that Grandmother came with Frances and Marie. In telling me, she focused most upon the physical aspects of the long labor, saying that she nearly died in the process. (I think she must have had post-traumatic stress syndrome, because she needed to tell me, a child, about it several times. I learned to change the subject because it was painful to hear.) She had been told that this baby was perfectly formed and looked like the Griffins. I think it showed extraordinary love, concern, and sensitivity for Grandmother and Grandad to organize their lives so that Grandmother could come with Frances and Marie to stay a whole month with my Mother at that time.

Grandaddy made an annual summer trip in his car to visit his children and family-of-origin relatives in Alabama. His mother and some siblings lived in the Lineville, AL area. When I was a small child, his car would have two or three other family members with him, mainly James, Frances, or Marie. I think Lewis was not with them as often because he joined the Navy after he graduated from high school. I don't recall Grandmother being on these trips. I don't know why. I am under the impression that her health began to fail, so perhaps she did not feel like taking this trip. Remember, we did not have air conditioned cars in those days. Grandmother had cancer of the breast, but that was not the cause of her death. I don't know what the cause of her death was. Perhaps you could find it on her death certificate. The last time I saw her was in Memphis during my junior or senior year at Wesleyan College. I remember that when I went to tell her "Goodbye" before we left, she grasped my hand and looked at me in such a special way that I can recall this very moment. I had a feeling that I didn't understand then and now I am wondering if she knew that she might not ever see me again. Grandmother taught me to embroider. I still have a few items that I made then. She also attended to my requests. One of the things that Ruth gave to me was Grandmother's glove box. In retrospect, I remembered that I admired Grandmother's glove box very much. I must have spoken my admiration of it so often that Ruth remembered to give it to me.

My Mother once told me, after Grandmother had died, "I can sometimes feel my Mother's presence." It was in that connection, I think, that once when my Mother visited me (as an adult) in Colorado, she asked for reassurance that I would tell her if I had a problem. She said that when I was very young (I don't know the exact age, but very young), I would call her often if she was in a different room, yet when she appeared, there didn't seem to be anything that I needed or wanted, so she told me to quit calling her. Grandmother noticed this and told her that she should not tell me to quit calling her. Grandmother told Mother, "Some day, Mary is going to need you and she is not going to call you." Apparently, Grandmother was a model that her children admired and wanted to emulate. They all said that she never said a mean thing about anyone. She organized and managed a lovely home. In my youngest years, the family lived in a two story house on Central Avenue in Memphis. They didn't move to the house on Hawthorne Street until after all the children, except Ruth and James, had left home. Grandmother and Grandad wanted all of their children to feel that they could come home there whenever they needed, or wanted to. Even I, as a child, had the feeling that if anything ever happened to my own parents, I could probably go to live with Grandmother and Grandad. At the same time, they made it perfectly clear that their children should become independent and self-reliant.

I think that their child-rearing practices probably changed somewhat from the eldest to the youngest, although some things remained the same. One constant was that children did not speak disrespectfully to their parents. I was very surprised once while visiting at the house on Central Avenue when Frances was a teenager and spoke disrespectfully to Grandmother about something while the evening meal was being prepared. Grandmother immediately slapped her face! That was the only time I remember a show of anger from Grandmother.

All of the children were expected to help with the household chores in some way. My Mother spoke of her responsibilities for helping to care for her younger siblings. As the eldest child, all of her siblings addressed her as "Sister" instead of by her name. That tradition was carried on when some of her nieces and nephews addressed her as "Aunt Sister". The girls helped with preparing meals and house cleaning and washing and ironing clothes, although I remember that there was household help at the houses in Memphis. Perhaps while Grandad's medical practice was growing in its early phases, there wasn't as much money for employed household help, or there was enough for everyone to do even with household help. Remember that modern conveniences in kitchens and stores were quite different. They started from scratch in cooking, canning, making jams and jellies, and made most of their own clothes. I remember my Mother saying once, "I hope that you will never have to iron shirts!" Grandad always had to have a clean shirt and they may have gotten dirty more often in the days when he made house calls. I remember Clarice remarking once about Grandad always needing a clean shirt. I don't know what the boys' chores were, except that Mother once mentioned that Skip sometimes went with Grandad on his house calls. Remember that he graduated from Alabama Medical College in 1900, long before the automobile had been invented. He made house calls on horseback or in a horse and buggy. So he had to have a fresh horse. So Skip probably had some responsibility for the horse and buggy. Clarice told me once that nearly everyone had some responsibility relating to Grandad's practice of medicine. She said that one of hers was to hold the lantern at night if Grandad had to make a night call. She had to hold it while others got the buggy out of the garage, hitched up the horse, and helped Grandad take off. James also told me about being expected to accompany Grandad on his house calls. James said that sometimes Grandad would stay a whole day at one house, making observations, while he gathered the family medical history. He did not have available the modern tools of diagnosis, such as X-ray, sonograms, lab tests, etc. He also had some understanding that some physical illnesses are caused by emotional problems and family relationships. James said that he always made inquiries about these dimensions in taking the family history. He was aware of domestic violence and child abuse. James and my Mother said that he often told parents that they should not hit or punish their children anywhere around the face or hands. Part of the reason for staying so long at one home may have been to observe family interactions.

Grandad and Grandmother were married soon after he graduated from Alabama Medical College. He started his medical practice in Hackneyville, AL where my Mother was born. He went there because there was a gold rush there, meaning that lots of people would be coming there and needing a doctor. As soon as the telephone was invented, Grandad arranged to set up a telephone exchange for the whole community right in his own home, the kind that required an operator who had to negotiate the transactions between callers and receivers by plugging connections into various holes in the equipment. I don't know if the operator was always an employee or if some of the Griffin children had to learn to manage this telephone exchange also.

The boys may have been involved in chores relating to household maintenance. Great-Grandaddy Griffin was a carpenter and farmer, so Grandad learned a lot about houses and their maintenance from his own father. I remember their home being well-maintained. My memories include James painting, inside and outside, periodically and taking care of the lawn and flowers. Grandmother loved flowers. Her younger children, James, Lewis, Frances, and Marie told me about their memories of helping Grandmother in her flower garden and all four of them maintained beautiful gardens in their own homes.

Grandparents were always involved in the local Baptist Church. I am under the impression that Grandad helped to organize one or more Baptist churches. I think something was said about that in his obituary.

Grandmother must have been a superb organizer. Grandad volunteered to serve in the U.S. Army during World War I. He was too old to be drafted. He was accepted and soon sent to France. This left Grandmother at home alone with lots of very young children. My mother, the eldest, was in College by that time.

I mentioned earlier that perhaps their child rearing practices changed from the eldest to the youngest. Everyone seems to agree that Grandad was very bossy. Mother told me once that he also gave orders to Grandmother and she once heard her mother say, "Doctor, don't talk to me like that!" Apparently, at that time, she addressed her husband as "Doctor", but that changed in later years, as I did hear her call him "Olin". I mentioned in an earlier message that he decided what my Mother would major in at Judson College. I don't think that he entered those decisions of his younger children. I think the grandparents grew more relaxed in managing their younger children. At the same time throughout all, they were very generous and loving.

Grandparents were ambitious for their children and wanted them to go to College and encouraged the daughters, as well as the sons, to plan for self-sufficiency. One way to do that was to get a college education. I've already written about the Griffin girls as teachers and professionals. In this respect, I believe the grandparents were way ahead of many in their generation as many of my Mother's peers could not imagine themselves being in the working world or wanting to have professions.

Grandad attended the College graduation of each of his grandchildren as long as he lived. He attended Marian's and mine at Wesleyan College, and I suspect that he also attended Annette's, and maybe Julie's. He died in 1953 while I was attending the London School of Economics and Political Science in England. Grandad wrote letters to everyone in the family. I wish that someone had saved some of his letters. I remember the last letter than I received from him in 1953while I was in London. He wrote to me about the birth of John Charles Griffin and that the baby John had been stricken with polio. He wrote that he hoped that John had received the best medical care available and had conferred with Lewis and Mildred about this.

Well, I've come to a stopping point. I'll write again if/when I think of more.... 

Family

Minnie Dallas Strickland (26 Oct 1877 - 19 Jun 1950)
Marriage*16 May 1900 He married Minnie Dallas Strickland at Standing Rock, Chambers Co., Alabama, on 16 May 1900 at age 29.2 
Children
ChartsBenjamin (son of Joseph) Culpepper of Edgecombe Co., NC: Descendant Chart
John Culpepper of Randolph Co, AL: Descendant Chart
Last Edited7 May 2006

Citations

  1. Joe Inzer Griffin, Irondale, AL.
  2. Alburt Burton Moore, History of Alabama and Her People, Chicago, IL: American, Historical, Society, Inc., 1927.

Mildred Walene Latimer

Female, #11459, (6 Jun 1921 - 19 Nov 1984)
Father*Jerome Brady Latimer (15 May 1870 - 21 Mar 1935)
Mother*Nannie Texonia Jackson (3 Feb 1881 - 27 Sep 1967)
Married Name Her married name was Turner. 
Birth*6 Jun 1921 Mildred was born at Tallapoosa Co., Alabama, on 6 Jun 1921. 
Death of Father21 Mar 1935 Her father Jerome Brady Latimer died on 21 Mar 1935 at Tallapoosa Co., Alabama
Marriage*12 Dec 1942 She married Lewis Wyman Griffin at Birmingham, Jefferson Co., Alabama, on 12 Dec 1942 at age 21. 
Married Name12 Dec 1942  As of 12 Dec 1942, her married name was Griffin. 
Marriage* She married William Franklin Turner
Death of Mother27 Sep 1967 Her mother Nannie Texonia Jackson died on 27 Sep 1967 at Tallapoosa Co., Alabama
Death of Spouse6 Oct 1981 Her husband Lewis Wyman Griffin died on 6 Oct 1981 at Memphis, Shelby Co., Tennessee
Death*19 Nov 1984 She died at Summerland Key, Monroe Co., Florida, on 19 Nov 1984 at age 63. 

Family 1

Lewis Wyman Griffin (6 Oct 1915 - 6 Oct 1981)
Marriage*12 Dec 1942 She married Lewis Wyman Griffin at Birmingham, Jefferson Co., Alabama, on 12 Dec 1942 at age 21. 
Children

Family 2

William Franklin Turner (11 Jan 1918 - 8 May 2000)
Marriage* She married William Franklin Turner
Last Edited9 Jan 2009

Lewis Wyman Griffin

Male, #11460, (6 Oct 1915 - 6 Oct 1981)
Father*James Olin Griffin (30 Jan 1871 - 31 Jul 1953)
Mother*Minnie Dallas Strickland (26 Oct 1877 - 19 Jun 1950)
Birth*6 Oct 1915 Lewis was born at Hackneyville, Tallapoosa Co., Alabama, on 6 Oct 1915. 
Marriage*12 Dec 1942 He married Mildred Walene Latimer at Birmingham, Jefferson Co., Alabama, on 12 Dec 1942 at age 27. 
Death of Mother19 Jun 1950 His mother Minnie Dallas Strickland died on 19 Jun 1950 at Memphis, Shelby Co., Tennessee
Death of Father31 Jul 1953 His father James Olin Griffin died on 31 Jul 1953 at Memphis, Shelby Co., Tennessee
Death*6 Oct 1981 He died at Memphis, Shelby Co., Tennessee, on 6 Oct 1981 at age 66. 
Burial*8 Oct 1981 His body was interred on 8 Oct 1981 at Memorial Park Cemetery, Memphis, Shelby Co., Tennessee
Biography*  James M. Griffin wrote 20 Apr 1977: I suppose you know your Daddy was named after Lewis Culpepper and Lewis Halsey - The Wyman was for a Doctor Wyman.
      James O. Griffin, Lewis Wyman Griffin's father, was overseas during World War I and he wrote his young son several letters. This is one: ___________________________________________________1919 Dear Lewis I bet you slumber in dream land while I am writing to you. It is about half past seven A.M. over here and I will let you guess what time it is over [t]here. Dad is feeling fine and dandy this morning. My neck is still improving. I can twist it around like an owl now. Do you know how much they can twist their necks? There is still an enlargement on the right side but there is no soreness to it. In fact there is only little soreness about it anywhere. They tell us that we are going to move into another ward today, but I do not know whether there is any truth in it or not. This section of the center is to close out by the twentieth so I guess we will not be here much longer. Have you gotten your tricycle yet? Dad has got the money to buy it with when he gets back on that side of the ocean. But you must not try to ride down that big hill when you get it. You may ride up the hill but I am afraid that you will have a runaway if you try to ride down the big hill. It looks like it is going to be a fair day in France. Yesterday afternoon was fine. Be a nice good sweet boy and have a good time. ___________________________________________________Love from Dad
      A brother, James M. Griffin, wrote 10 Oct 1981 that as James O. Griffin changed the location of his practice, the family moved from Hackneyville, AL to Goodwater, to Leeds, to Eclectic, to Moulton, AL and finally to Memphis, TN. One of Lewis W. Griffin's childhood jobs was to hold a lantern by the buggie wheels when Dr. Griffin made his occasional night calls. This was to keep clear of ruts. A cousin, Mrs. C. H. (Margaret Whatley) Lee wrote, 31 Jan 1982, of her memories of these early years: I thought of your daddy and the memories I have of him when he would visit our home in the summer along with Joe [Inzer] Griffin. Your daddy, Joe and Chalmus [W. Whatley] were right at the same age. They sure had a great time romping in daddy's pasture and playing in the creek. There used to be tremendous rains and the creek would get up and those boys would get mother's tubs and float on the water in those tubs. It's a wonder they didn't get killed, but they sure had fun. They would go to the watermellon patch and there were so many things of interest for them to do.
      Lewis W. Griffin graduated from Central High School in Memphis and 19 Jun 1934 he enlisted in the Navy as an Apprentice Seaman and served aboard the U.S.S. Colorado. He became a Fireman Second Class then a Fireman First Class and was stationed in the boiler division and maintained the boilers and the auxiliary equipment. He was honorably discharged 26 Mar 1938 as a Watertender Second Class. He was listed as 5 ft. 7 3/4 in., 160 lbs. with blue eyes, brown hair, and a ruddy complexion.
      After leaving the Navy, he was employed by U.S. Bedding as quality inspector in the production of mattresses and studio couches, but September 1940, he got a job at DuPont at Millington, TN as a carpenter's helper doing construction. In a 11 Feb 1972 letter, Lewis W. Griffin wrote: I was working for Du Pont at Millington, Tenn., which is about 15 miles north of Memphis - I went to work there as a Carpenter's Helper making 60 cents an hour - this was better than the 49 cents an hour I was making at U.S. Bedding Co. Well, when they put the Power House in operation, I was called in to help start it up - On my application blank was my Navy Service - [so they knew] I knew how to operate Turbines and Boilers - So [I] was jumped to 90 cents [as turbine operator] and then again to $1.25 [as boiler operator] - Boy, by then I thought I was rich - Well then the Japs hit Pearl Harbor.... Anyway, I was called to the office and was informed that the management wanted me to go to [Alabama Ordnance Works at] Childersburg [AL] to help start [a power house at ] a new Powder Plant.... When I first got to Childersburg, I was still a Boiler Operator, then after training several people... I was promoted to outside Foreman, then to Shift Supervisor and then to Training Supervisor - The Draft was taking people far faster than you could train them - Back in those days, a turbine was $90,000... so, if you did not know how to get it on the line, you could wreck it in a hurry.... I helped start up the Power House at Millington, at Childersburg #1 Power House and also #2 Power House. At #2 Power House we were making super heated steam for the turbines and then we had the reducing stations to cut it back to 300# - 150# - 50# saturated steam - This all went back through the whole Powder Plant to make gun powder as well as T.N.T. and Tetryl - you should see how all these things come out.... I had to explain to a Powder Line Foreman that he should call before he simply cuts everything off. Something like that really makes it rough and you really have to run not to lose everything. Now at Childersburg, they built what then was Plant III - me and my boss had the only Pass from the Power Dept. that could get in.... They used millions of gallons of water per day and as to how much saturated steam, I do not know - they would simply call that they were not getting the water so we would go to the Pump House and put another pump out the line - They were making the Heavy Water which was in the first Atomic Bomb that was dropped - Childersburg produced the Heavy Water and from there I guess it went to Oak Ridge, Tenn.
      The plant shut down in December 1945 and Lewis found work for a few months selling farm implements for McNess Sales Co. before getting hired as a Shift Foreman for the Universal Atlas Cement Division of U.S. Steel Corporation plant in Leeds, AL. He supervised the kilns, raw mills, finish mills, raw storage, and clinker storage and 14 men in the production of seven types of cement. He retired as the General Operating Foreman.
      In Leeds, in 1946, the Griffin family lived at 3000 4th Avenue South, then the family moved in 1951 into a house on 3323 Norman Drive. Finally, they moved in 1961 into a house which Lewis Griffin had built on 3 acres of land near the Ashville & Montevallo Road into Leeds. Mrs. J. A. (Bonnie Griffin) Turnage wrote of a visit to Leeds in a 19 Jul 1981 letter to her father: We [the Turnage family] rode around in Leeds briefly - You can't see the house on Montevallo Rd. for all the pine trees - they are really pretty. The house on Norman Drive looks good - they have it a light green - I didn't have time to see about getting any rose cuttings - The backyard sure looked good tho. Leeds looks about the same except for a few new buildings - It felt good being there - I feels like home even tho I don't have any kinfolks there.
      Lewis W. Griffin died in his sleep 6 Oct 1981 of "Arteriosclerotic Heart Disease" according to the certificate of death. The following obituary is from an unknown source: LEWIS W. GRIFFIN, 66, of 883 Hawthorne, retired executive with the Universal Atlas Cement Co. in Leeds, Ala., [died] yesterday at home. He was a member of Leeds Presbyterian Church and a veteran of the Navy. He leaves a daughter, Mrs. Bonnie Turnage of McComb, Miss; two sons, Lewis W. Griffin Jr. of Palo Alto, Calif., and John Griffin of Birmingham, Ala; five sisters, Ruth Griffin of Memphis, Mrs. Louise Vaughn of Sun City, Ariz., Mrs. Clarice Duscoe of Union City, Tenn., Mrs. Frances Brown of Chattanooga and Mrs. Marie Middlecoff of Somerville, Tenn; a brother, James Griffin of Memphis; and four grandchildren. Services at 10:45 a.m. tomorrow at Memphis Funeral Home on Union; burial in Memorial Park.
      Mrs. J. A. (Bonnie Griffin) Turnage wrote in a 23 Oct 1981 letter: He [Lewis W. Griffin, Sr.] was buried right next to his parents & the gravesite is really pretty - on a hill. The cemetery is one of the prettiest I've ever seen. 

Family

Mildred Walene Latimer (6 Jun 1921 - 19 Nov 1984)
Marriage*12 Dec 1942 He married Mildred Walene Latimer at Birmingham, Jefferson Co., Alabama, on 12 Dec 1942 at age 27. 
Children
ChartsBenjamin (son of Joseph) Culpepper of Edgecombe Co., NC: Descendant Chart
John Culpepper of Randolph Co, AL: Descendant Chart
Last Edited21 Sep 2000