Philippa Hinckstead1

Female, #8467, (say 1549 - before 7 Jul 1574)
Birth*say 1549 Philippa was born say 1549. 
Married Namesay 1567  As of say 1567, her married name was Culpeper. 
Marriage*say 1567 She married Francis Culpeper of Greenway Court, co. Kent at Harrietsham, co. Kent, England, say 1567. 
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Culpepper. 
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Colepeper. 
Birth of Son1568 Her son John Culpeper of Folkington, co. Sussex was born in 1568. 
Birth of Sonbefore 2 Nov 1573 Her son Walter Culpeper was born before 2 Nov 1573 at Harrietsham, co. Kent, England
Burial*7 Jul 1574 Her body was interred on 7 Jul 1574 at Harrietsham, co. Kent, England
Death*before 7 Jul 1574 She died before 7 Jul 1574. 
Biography* The christian name appears from her burial at Harrietsham, July 7, 1574, as 'Philippa, uxor Francisci Culpep'.' The description quoted ('dau. and heir of . . . of Hinckstead.') is that given in one of the Rowe More Kentish pedigrees (B. M. Add. MS. 5528, fo. 176). No other identification has appeared.
.
Source: Fairfax Harrison, "The Proprietors of the Northern neck." 

Family

Francis Culpeper of Greenway Court, co. Kent (1538 - 31 May 1591)
Marriage*say 1567 She married Francis Culpeper of Greenway Court, co. Kent at Harrietsham, co. Kent, England, say 1567. 
Children
Last Edited15 Jun 2011

Citations

  1. Col. F.W.T. Attree R.E./F.S.A. & Rev. J.H.L. Booker M.A., "The Sussex Colepepers, Part I", Sussex Archaeological Collections, XLVII,47-81, (1904)http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/sussex/default.htm.

Joan Pordage1

Female, #8468, (1538 - 23 Mar 1598)
Father*John Pordage of Rodmersham, co. Kent (1493 - 14 May 1589)
Birth*1538 Joan was born in 1538. 
Marriage1550 She married William Stede of Harrietsham, co. Kent, Esq. in 1550. 
Married Name1550  As of 1550, her married name was Stede. 
Birth of Sonsay 1566 Her son Sir William Stede of Harrietsham, Knight was born say 1566. 
Married Name1574  As of 1574, her married name was Colepeper. 
Married Name1574  As of 1574, her married name was Colepeper. 
Married Name1574  As of 1574, her married name was Culpeper. 
Marriage*1574 She married Francis Culpeper of Greenway Court, co. Kent at Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England, in 1574. 
Birth of Soncirca 1575 Her son Sir Thomas Culpeper of Hollingbourne, the Elder, Knight was born circa 1575. 
Death of Father14 May 1589 Her father John Pordage of Rodmersham, co. Kent died on 14 May 1589. 
Will20 May 1590 She is mentioned in the will of Francis Culpeper of Greenway Court, co. Kent at co. Kent, England, on 20 May 1590.2 
Death of Spouse31 May 1591 Her husband Francis Culpeper of Greenway Court, co. Kent died on 31 May 1591. 
Will*8 Mar 1594 She made a will on 8 Mar 1594.

Abstract of the Will of Joan (Pordage) Colepeper

My goods and chattels to my welbeloved son Wm. Steede of Harrietsham Esq (Sir William Stede of Harrietsham, Knight) to pay my debts. He is executor. £100 to purchase land for the poor in Harrietsham and Hollingbourne. To my son (i.e. son in law) William Covert (William Covert). Executor to have 10 rings made for the following:

To my sonne Wm. Covert and his wife: 2.

To my sonne (i.e. son in law) Richard Colepeper (Richard Culpeper of Newton Longville, co. Bucks.) and his wife: 2.

To my sonne Thomas Colepeper (Sir Thomas Culpeper of Hollingbourne, the Elder, Knight): 1.

To my sonne Edward Patriche (Edward Partriche) and to my daughter Susanna (Susanna Stede): 2.

To my sonne Walter Colepeper (Walter Culpeper): 1. (This must mean her stepson, the half brother of Thomas Colepeper above, who in putting up the monument to his parent's memory in Hollingbourne Church, styles himself "unicus iis communis filius" and therefore shows that he was not "slain in Holland" before 1594.)

To my sonne Steed (Sir William Stede of Harrietsham, Knight) to retain 1 for himself and to deliver 1 other to my daughter his wife (Cicely Culpeper). Residue to my son Thomas Colepeper (Sir Thomas Culpeper of Hollingbourne, the Elder, Knight) when 24. As to Greenway Court I give it as I am empowered by my husband's will to my son Thomas for a period of 2 years after my decease.3 
Death*23 Mar 1598 She died at Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England, on 23 Mar 1598. 
Burial*7 Apr 1598 Her body was interred on 7 Apr 1598 at Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England.1 
Probate9 May 1598 Probate action was taken on Joan's estate on 9 May 1598 at co. Kent, England.3 
Biography* For Pordage of Rodmershain (near Sittingbourne and only a few miles north of Greenway Court) see Hasted, ii, 593; The Genealogist, vi, 76.
     For Stede of Harrietsham, with whom the Wigsell Culpepers several times intermarried in consequence of this alliance of Francis, see the pedigree returned at the Visitation of Kent, 1619 (Harl. Soc. Pub., xlii, 71) and Berry's continuation in his Kent. One of these Stedes, whose mother was a Culpeper, served in America as Governor of Barbados.
     Joan Pordage was buried in Hollingbourne, April 7, 1598, as Joane Culpeper, vidua' and left a will, which combines genealogical material of the Stedes and Culpepers.4 

Family 1

William Stede of Harrietsham, co. Kent, Esq. (say 1529 - )
Marriage1550 She married William Stede of Harrietsham, co. Kent, Esq. in 1550. 
Children

Family 2

Francis Culpeper of Greenway Court, co. Kent (1538 - 31 May 1591)
Marriage*1574 She married Francis Culpeper of Greenway Court, co. Kent at Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England, in 1574. 
Child
ChartsDiana, Princess of Wales: Culpeper Ancestral Chart
Last Edited16 May 2011

Citations

  1. Col. F.W.T. Attree R.E./F.S.A. & Rev. J.H.L. Booker M.A., "The Sussex Colepepers, Part I", Sussex Archaeological Collections, XLVII,47-81, (1904)http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/sussex/default.htm.
  2. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    P.C.C. 85 Sainberbe, Will dated May 20, 1590, Proved November 22, 1591.
  3. Col. F.W.T. Attree R.E./F.S.A. & Rev. J.H.L. Booker M.A., "The Sussex Colepepers, Part I", Sussex Archaeological Collections, XLVII,47-81, (1904)http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/sussex/default.htm.
    C. Liber 38, No. 168.
  4. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm.

Lettice Clarke

Female, #8469, (say 1560 - )
Father*Humphrey Clarke of Westhalks in Kingsnorth, Kent (1501 - )
Mother*Margaret Mayne (s 1530 - )
Birth*say 1560 Lettice was born at Kingsworth, co. Kent, England, say 1560. 
Marriage*say 1578 She married Dr. Martin Culpeper of Feckenham in Astwood, co. Worc. say 1578. 
Married Namesay 1578  As of say 1578, her married name was Culpeper. 
Birth of Sonsay 1580 Her son Sir Martin Culpeper of Deane, co. Oxon was born say 1580 at Deane, Spelsbury, Oxfordshire, England
Birth of Son1581 Her son Sir Stephen Culpeper of Chipping Campden, Glouchester was born in 1581. 
Will1 Oct 1605 She is mentioned in the will of Dr. Martin Culpeper of Feckenham in Astwood, co. Worc. on 1 Oct 1605.1 

Family

Dr. Martin Culpeper of Feckenham in Astwood, co. Worc. (1540 - circa 9 Oct 1605)
Children
Last Edited20 Jan 2011

Citations

  1. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    Will of Dr. Martin Culpeper of Astwood in Feckingham; P.C.C. Hayes, 88; Will dated October 1, 1605; Proved December 12, 1605.

Thomas Culpeper of the Middle Temple1

Male, #8470, (say 1602 - say 1652)
Father*John Culpeper of Astwood in Feckenham, co. Worcs. (1565 - c 16 Dec 1635)
Mother*Ursula Woodcock (b 27 Jan 1566 - b 2 Jun 1612)
Name Variation He was also known as Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Culpeper. 
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Culpepper. 
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Colepeper. 
Birth*say 1602 Thomas was born at Harrietsham, co. Kent, England, say 1602. 
Marriage*10 Jul 1628 He married Katherine St. Leger at Ulcombe, co. Kent, England, on 10 Jul 1628. 
Birth of Son1631 His son Alexander Culpeper Surveyor General of VA was born in 1631. 
Birth of Soncirca 1633 His son John Culpeper son of Thomas & Katherine was born circa 1633 at Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England
Will14 Dec 1635 He is mentioned in the will of John Culpeper of Astwood in Feckenham, co. Worcs. on 14 Dec 1635.2 
Death of Fathercirca 16 Dec 1635 His father John Culpeper of Astwood in Feckenham, co. Worcs. died circa 16 Dec 1635 at Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England.2 
Will13 Jan 1644 He is mentioned in the will of Sir Alexander Culpeper of Greenway Court, Knight at Greenway Court, Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England, on 13 Jan 1644.3,4 
Will30 Jan 1644 He is mentioned in the will of Sir Alexander Culpeper of Greenway Court, Knight on 30 Jan 1644.5,6 
Death*say 1652 He died at Virginia say 1652. 
Biography He is referenced in a biographical note for John Culpeper the Merchant.7 
Biography* Thomas Culpeper of the Middle Temple, son of John Culpeper of Astwood in Feckenham, co. Worcs. is the lost pleiad of the Wigsell pedigree. A victim of the disorganization of society during the Civil Wars, he left few certain genealogical records, and it is necessary to tie together such material for him as is available by deduction and argument; but by careful tests of that material in relation to the other Thomases of his generation, the logical process of elimination makes it possible to reconstruct his career. The difficulty begins with his birth, for the mutilated parish register of Harrietsham, which records his younger brother's baptism, does not testify for him. Although Dr. Martin Culpeper's will, written in October, 1605, seems to imply that he did not then know of the existence of the great nephew for whom he intended a portion of his estate, this Thomas must have been born in 1602 so as to be of age in 1623, when his record requires that estate.

The first certain testimony for him is his admission to the Middle Temple on May 7, 1621, as 'Mr. Thomas Culpeper, son and heir apparent of John Culpeper of Astwood, Esq.' (Bidwell, ii, 662). He was then bound with his father and the 'Mr. John Culpeper, jun.,' who was about to be knighted and eventually became the first Lord Culpeper (see: R:3]), with whom he was associated to the end of his life. That he had embarked on a serious professional career in the tradition of his father appears from the fact that chambers were assigned to him in the Temple in 1623, when we assume he had attained his majority; and an incidental recital of his name in the Middle Temple records him in 1630 as 'of the utter bar.'

We have seen that his father was one of the original subscribers to the Virginia Company; in 1623, while John was still living, 'Mr. Thomas Culpeper of the Middle Temple, London, Esq.' became a member of that company also, in his own right, when his kinsman, George Scott, 'passed' to him three shares in the company (Records of the Virginia Company, L. C. ed., pp. 389, 412). That the investment connoted more than a casual investment interest appears from the later record (Cal. State Papers, Dom. 1633-34, p. 223) of his ownership of a half interest, with his merchant brother, in a ship, the Thomas and John, which was destined to carry many immigrants to Virginia.

The other records of him, until the beginning of war between King and Parliament, are his marriage at Ulcombe in 1628; the baptism and burial there of his first child in 1629; the baptism of three younger children from 1630 to 1634 at Hollingbourne; his probate of his father's will in January, 1635/6, and his name as first born child on his father's MI. (1636). These testimonies show that on his marriage he went to live with his uncle, Sir Alexander Culpeper of Greenway Court, Knight, at Ulcombe; but soon transferred his residence to Greenway Court, where his father later joined him.

It may fairly be assumed that he was one of the 'gentlemen from the Inns of Court' who offered their services to the King after the passage of the Grand Remonstrance (Gardiner, x, 124; Bedwell, Middle Temple, p. 52) and that he subsequently served in the royalist army; but his name does not appear in the army lists of 1642 (Peacock, Army Lists of the Roundheads and Cavaliers, 1863; Masson, Life of Milton, ii, 445), nor has diligent search turned up any reference to him in other printed sources for biography during the first war. The next definite record is therefore in January, 1644/5, at Oxford; where he witnessed the will and a codicil of his uncle, Sir Alexander Culpeper; under which the inheritance intended for him was placed in trust for his young son (Alexander Culpeper Surveyor General of VA) with the palpable purpose of avoiding the political forfeiture which might follow a bequest to Thomas himself.

Thereafter the record is silent again until 1648, when he turns up as a participant in the royalist plots in Kent (Markham, The Great Lord Fairfax, p. 305). In this adventure he was drawn along with the earl of Norwich's little army in its irresolute passage of the Thames, after a smashing defeat at Maidstone, to the refuge found in Colchester in June of that year. And so Thomas became one of the gallant band who, to the astonishment of all England, for eleven weeks maintained themselves behind improvised fortifications against the grim and angry leaguer of an ever victorious general 'whose name in arms through Europe rings.' When at last starvation brought the garrison of Colchester to its inevitable collapse, Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Culpepper was one of the 'lords, Superior officers and gentlemen of distinction' named by Matthew Carter who, by the terms of the capitulation, were 'rendered to the mercy of the Lord General.' After executing Lucas and Lisle and reserving the others 'who bore the principal command' for action by the parliament, 'the General distributed to every regiment a certain number of gentlemen who were prisoners, as slaves to the gallies, to ransom themselves; and most of them did afterwards purchase their liberty, by giving as much as they were able for the same, and returned home.' That Thomas Culpeper availed himself of that rigorous quarter and in doing so impoverished himself may be deduced from Sir William Berkeley's later testimony that he 'lost all his estate, life and liberty in the King's service' (Am. & W. I., 1669-74, No. 571).

What next became of him appears in the precedent of the experience of his kinsman and recent comrade in arms, Col. Samuel Tuke, whom John Evelyn records having met in Paris soon after the surrender of Colchester. Thomas Culpeper seems also to have made his way to France. His immediate attraction was that Lord Culpeper was already there. It was thus that our next record is at St. Germains, where, in the court of the 'King of Virginia,' on September 18, 1649, Thomas Culpeper was made one of the original patentees of the Northern Neck.

When this charter was renewed, May 8, 1669, that Thomas Culpeper was recited to be dead (Am. & W. I., 1669-74, No. 63). It appears elsewhere that Katherine, his wife, died a widow in 1658; but it remains for a final deduction as to when and where she lost her husband. The Virginia records prove that some months after the Northern Neck charter was sealed, Sir Dudley Wyatt, the other junior among the proprietors, went out to the colony and there soon died. There is no such evidence for Thomas Culpeper, but the tradition (W. & M. Quar., x, 274) is that he was Wyatt's companion to the end. This is persuasive because it is supported by the facts that both Thomas Culpeper's daughters married in Virginia in 1652, that one of his sons was described by a Virginian in 1671 as 'a gentleman of this Country,' while the other was making a career in Carolina; that his brother John Culpeper the Merchant is shown to have been established in Accomac, and that Thomas himself left no English record of his death or of administration of his estate. We conclude, therefore, that he went out to Virginia in 1650, hoping to establish himself in the Northern Neck; that he took his family with him, and that he died in the colony not later than 1652, when his widow and son returned to England.

Source: Fairfax Harrison.8 
Biography He is referenced in a biographical note for Henry Culpeper of Lower Norfolk Co., VA.9,7 
Research note18 Aug 2011 He is referenced in a research note for Susanna Culpeper of Connecticut

Family

Katherine St. Leger (circa 1602 - 1658)
Marriage*10 Jul 1628 He married Katherine St. Leger at Ulcombe, co. Kent, England, on 10 Jul 1628. 
Children
ChartsThe 12th century Culpepers of England: Descendant Chart (16 generations, Males only)
Last Edited3 May 2011

Citations

  1. Col. F.W.T. Attree R.E./F.S.A. & Rev. J.H.L. Booker M.A., "The Sussex Colepepers, Part I", Sussex Archaeological Collections, XLVII,47-81, (1904)http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/sussex/default.htm.
  2. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm.
  3. E-mail written 2007 to Warren Culpepper from Charles Andrew Grigsby, England, e-mail address.
    Transcription of Will of Sir Alexander Culpeper of Greenway Court Hollingbourne Kent 1649
    Ref: 422.
  4. Public Records Office, National Archives, London.
    Image of will at: /archives/uk/wills/images/Alexander_of_Greenway_Court_1649.pdf .
  5. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    P. C. C. Rivers, 157.
    Image:http://gen.culpepper.com/archives/uk/wills/images/Alexander_of_Greenway_Court_1645-1.pdf.
  6. Public Records Office, National Archives, London.
    Image of will at: /archives/uk/wills/images/Alexander_of_Greenway_Court_1645-1.pdf.
  7. Lewis W. Griffin Jr. (#47), Phoenix, AZ, e-mail address.
  8. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    Chapter 4: XIII Thomas Culpepper.
  9. Warren L. Culpepper (#1942), Former publisher of Culpepper Connections, e-mail address.

Cicely Culpeper1

Female, #8471, (say 1604 - circa 4 Nov 1664)
Father*John Culpeper of Astwood in Feckenham, co. Worcs. (1565 - c 16 Dec 1635)
Mother*Ursula Woodcock (b 27 Jan 1566 - b 2 Jun 1612)
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Culpepper. 
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Colepeper. 
Birth*say 1604 Cicely was born say 1604. 
Will14 Dec 1635 She is mentioned in the will of John Culpeper of Astwood in Feckenham, co. Worcs. on 14 Dec 1635.2 
Death of Fathercirca 16 Dec 1635 Her father John Culpeper of Astwood in Feckenham, co. Worcs. died circa 16 Dec 1635 at Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England.2 
Will30 Jan 1644 She is mentioned in the will of Sir Alexander Culpeper of Greenway Court, Knight on 30 Jan 1644.3,4 
Death*circa 4 Nov 1664 She died circa 4 Nov 1664. 
Burial*5 Nov 1664 Her body was interred on 5 Nov 1664 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, England
Biography* She was probably baptised in London, but the record has not been found. As a consequence she first appears in her father's will (1635) as 'my dau. Sicely C.' As 'Cecil' she is entered the second child on the MI. in Hollingbourne. In the will of Sir Alexander (1645) she appears as 'my neice Cicely C.'
.
Chester (Westminster Burials, Harl. Soc.) cites the burial in the cloisters of Westminster Abbey, November 5, 1664, of 'Cicely Culpeper;' who, as may be demonstrated by the process of elimination, can only have been this daughter of John of Feckenham. .
Fairfax Harrison, "The Proprietors of the Northern Neck." 
Last Edited15 Jun 2011

Citations

  1. Col. F.W.T. Attree R.E./F.S.A. & Rev. J.H.L. Booker M.A., "The Sussex Colepepers, Part I", Sussex Archaeological Collections, XLVII,47-81, (1904)http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/sussex/default.htm.
  2. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm.
  3. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    P. C. C. Rivers, 157.
    Image:http://gen.culpepper.com/archives/uk/wills/images/Alexander_of_Greenway_Court_1645-1.pdf.
  4. Public Records Office, National Archives, London.
    Image of will at: /archives/uk/wills/images/Alexander_of_Greenway_Court_1645-1.pdf.

Frances Culpeper1

Female, #8472, (say 1608 - )
Father*John Culpeper of Astwood in Feckenham, co. Worcs. (1565 - c 16 Dec 1635)
Mother*Ursula Woodcock (b 27 Jan 1566 - b 2 Jun 1612)
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Culpepper. 
Name Variation She was also known as Frances Colepeper. 
Birth*say 1608 Frances was born say 1608. 
Marriage*7 Jan 1626 She married James Medlicote of Feckenham, Co. Worc. on 7 Jan 1626. 
Married Name7 Jan 1626  As of 7 Jan 1626, her married name was Medlicote. 
Biography* The Feckenharn register records the m., January 7, 1625/6, of 'James Medlico and Francis Culpeper' and the baptism, May 22, 1627, of 'Urslye the dau. of James Meadlicoote, gen.' She is named in her father's will (1635) 'Frances Medlicote, my daur.,' and in that of Sir Alexander12 as 'my neice Medlicoate, wife of James M. esq.' On her father's MI. she is entered 'Franciscum' the youngest child. 
Will14 Dec 1635 She is mentioned in the will of John Culpeper of Astwood in Feckenham, co. Worcs. on 14 Dec 1635.2 
Will30 Jan 1644 She is mentioned in the will of Sir Alexander Culpeper of Greenway Court, Knight on 30 Jan 1644.3,4 

Family

James Medlicote of Feckenham, Co. Worc. (say 1605 - )
Marriage*7 Jan 1626 She married James Medlicote of Feckenham, Co. Worc. on 7 Jan 1626. 
Last Edited13 Feb 2011

Citations

  1. Col. F.W.T. Attree R.E./F.S.A. & Rev. J.H.L. Booker M.A., "The Sussex Colepepers, Part I", Sussex Archaeological Collections, XLVII,47-81, (1904)http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/sussex/default.htm.
  2. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm.
  3. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    P. C. C. Rivers, 157.
    Image:http://gen.culpepper.com/archives/uk/wills/images/Alexander_of_Greenway_Court_1645-1.pdf.
  4. Public Records Office, National Archives, London.
    Image of will at: /archives/uk/wills/images/Alexander_of_Greenway_Court_1645-1.pdf.

Katherine St. Leger1

Female, #8473, (circa 1602 - 1658)
Father*Sir Warham St. Leger (1579 - 11 Oct 1631)
Mother*Mary Hayward (c 1580 - 1662)
Birth*circa 1602 Katherine was born at co. Kent, England, circa 1602. 
Marriage*10 Jul 1628 She married Thomas Culpeper of the Middle Temple at Ulcombe, co. Kent, England, on 10 Jul 1628. 
Married Name10 Jul 1628  As of 10 Jul 1628, her married name was Culpeper. 
Birth of Son1631 Her son Alexander Culpeper Surveyor General of VA was born in 1631. 
Death of Father11 Oct 1631 Her father Sir Warham St. Leger died on 11 Oct 1631 at Ulcombe, co. Kent, England
Birth of Soncirca 1633 Her son John Culpeper son of Thomas & Katherine was born circa 1633 at Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England
Will13 Jan 1644 She is mentioned in the will of Sir Alexander Culpeper of Greenway Court, Knight at Greenway Court, Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England, on 13 Jan 1644.2,3 
Will30 Jan 1644 She is mentioned in the will of Sir Alexander Culpeper of Greenway Court, Knight on 30 Jan 1644.4,5 
Death*1658 She died at Maidstone, co. Kent, England, in 1658. 
Probate*28 Aug 1658 Probate action was taken on Katherine's estate on 28 Aug 1658 at co. Kent, England
Biography* Katherine St. Leger, who was adopted by Sir Alexander Culpeper, and, as rehearsed post, married his nephew, Thomas Culpeper of Feckenham, one of the proprietors of the Northern Neck named in the charter of 1649, and was the mother of Frances Culpeper, wife of Sir William Berkeley, Governor of Virginia.

From Fairfax Harrison, "The Proprietors of the Northern Neck":
The m. is entered in the Ulcombe register, July 10, 1628, as 'Thomas Culpeper et Katherina Sentleger.' The bride appears in her place, and the m. is noted, in the Stemnuzta St. Leodigaria (hereinbefore cited), but the best evidence for her is the reference in the will of Sir Alexander C. (1645) to 'Katherine, the grandchild of my wife, whom I therefore call daughter... on her marriage with my nephew Thomas Culpeper.' The only other contemporary testimony available is the admon. granted August 28, 1658 (P.C.C. Admon. Act Book, 1658) on goods of 'Katherine Culpeper of Maidstone, Kent, to her son Alexander C.' That she was sister to that Ursula St. Leger, wife of Daniel Horsmanden, parson of Ulcombe, and grandmother of the wife of the first William Byrd of Virginia, explains the intimacy in Virginia between the Byrds and Frances, Lady Berkeley, as shown by contemporary letters. See Va. Mag., xxvi, 128.

 

Family

Thomas Culpeper of the Middle Temple (say 1602 - say 1652)
Marriage*10 Jul 1628 She married Thomas Culpeper of the Middle Temple at Ulcombe, co. Kent, England, on 10 Jul 1628. 
Children
Last Edited18 Mar 2001

Citations

  1. Col. F.W.T. Attree R.E./F.S.A. & Rev. J.H.L. Booker M.A., "The Sussex Colepepers, Part I", Sussex Archaeological Collections, XLVII,47-81, (1904)http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/sussex/default.htm.
  2. E-mail written 2007 to Warren Culpepper from Charles Andrew Grigsby, England, e-mail address.
    Transcription of Will of Sir Alexander Culpeper of Greenway Court Hollingbourne Kent 1649
    Ref: 422.
  3. Public Records Office, National Archives, London.
    Image of will at: /archives/uk/wills/images/Alexander_of_Greenway_Court_1649.pdf .
  4. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    P. C. C. Rivers, 157.
    Image:http://gen.culpepper.com/archives/uk/wills/images/Alexander_of_Greenway_Court_1645-1.pdf.
  5. Public Records Office, National Archives, London.
    Image of will at: /archives/uk/wills/images/Alexander_of_Greenway_Court_1645-1.pdf.

Alexander Culpeper Surveyor General of VA1

Male, #8474, (1631 - 24 Dec 1694)
Father*Thomas Culpeper of the Middle Temple (s 1602 - s 1652)
Mother*Katherine St. Leger (c 1602 - 1658)
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Culpepper. 
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Colepeper. 
Birth*1631 Alexander was born in 1631. 
Will13 Jan 1644 He is mentioned in the will of Sir Alexander Culpeper of Greenway Court, Knight at Greenway Court, Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England, on 13 Jan 1644.2,3 
Will30 Jan 1644 He is mentioned in the will of Sir Alexander Culpeper of Greenway Court, Knight on 30 Jan 1644.4,5 
Death of Fathersay 1652 His father Thomas Culpeper of the Middle Temple died say 1652 at Virginia
Death of Mother1658 His mother Katherine St. Leger died in 1658 at Maidstone, co. Kent, England
Marriage*19 Dec 1689 He married Judith Culpeper at St. Mary Magdalene, Old Fish Street, London, England, on 19 Dec 1689. 
Biography* Alexander Culpeper, 1631?-1694, makes his first appearance on the available record in the will (1645) of his great uncle, Sir Alexander Culpeper of Greenway Court, Knight, as 'my godson Alexander C., son and heir apparent of my said nephew Thomas C.', with the characterization that 'whereas said Alexander C., son of my said nephew Thomas C., is yet young and under age so as it is not certainly known how he will prove.' Lacking testimony of his baptism in the registers of Ulcombe, Hollingbourne and Harrietsham, it is a deduction that he was born in 1631; for that is the year in which, alone, he fits in between the proven baptisms of his elder sisters and younger brother. He would thus be fourteen when Sir Alexander described him as 'young and under age.'

We have conjectured that he was taken to Virginia by his father in 1650 and returned to England after his father's death in 1651; certainly he was in Kent in December, 1652, when, having probably recently come of age, he witnessed the will of his uncle, William Godd (P.C.C. Brent, 120; Cf. Va. Mag., xxiii, 382). After administering upon his mother's estate in August, 1658 (P.C.C. Admon. Act Book, 1658) he was still in England in July, 1660, when he witnessed the will of the first Lord Culpeper (John Lord Culpeper 1st Baron of Thoresway). In 1664 and 1666, while the second Lord Culpeper (Thomas Lord Culpeper 2nd Baron of Thoresway) was Governor of the Isle of Wight, 'Capt. Alexander Culpeper' was his Secretary, Commander of Cowes Castle and Vice-Admiral's deputy; and, as such, in correspondence with Secretary Williamson (Cal. Treasury Papers, 1660-67, p. 627). A year later, as 'Alexander C. of Leeds Castle,' he took title, on behalf of Lord Culpeper, to the manor of Newport in the Isle of Wight (Close Roll, 21 Car. II, pt. xiii, No. 151; Cf. Victoria County History, Hampshire, v, 261).

That he went out to Virginia after Lord Culpeper gave up his post in the Isle of Wight may be deduced from the fact that in June, 1671, he was in the colony preparing for a voyage to England, when he was described by William Sherwood of Jamestown, in a letter to Lord Arlington, as 'a gentlemen of this country' (Am. & W. I., 1669-74, No. 540). On this occasion he carried also letters from his new brother-in-law, Sir William Berkeley Governor of Virginia, soliciting for him a patent for a post in the colony recently vacant by the death of Edmund Scarbrough.

Culpeper, Alexander (in Virginia 1672, &c.) In 1672 Governor Berkeley applied to the English Government for the appointment of his wife's brother, Alexander Culpeper, to the office of surveyor general of Virginia. He stated that Captain Culpeper was a person who had lived a number of years in Virginia, and whose father had lost his estate, liberty and life in the King's service. V. M., I, 83. (from "Some Emigrants to Virginia"
byW. G. Stanard, Publ. 1911. )

The recommendation was effective: on November 17, 1671, there was enrolled (Patent Roll, 23 Car. II, pt. 8 [3131], No. 16; renewed by James II under date of October 21, 1685; there is a transcript in the MS. collection known as Blaythwayt's Charters, ii, 349, now in the Library of Congress) the following patent:

Alexander Culpeper's patent to be Surveyor General of Virginia
     CHARLES the second by the grace of God King of England, Scotland, ffrance and Ireland Defender of the ffaith &c. To all to whom these presents shall come Greeting-
     KNOW yee that Wee for divers good causes and considerations us hereunto especially moving, of our especiall grace, certain knowledge and meer motion Have given and granted, and by these presents for Us Our heirs and Successors Doe give and grant, unto Our Trusty and welbeloved Alexander Culpeper Esqr. the Office and Place of Our Surveyor Generall of and within Our Colony and Plantation of Virginia;
     And him the said Alexander Culpeper Our Surveyor Generall of & within our said Colony and Plantation of Virginia and of all and Singuler the Messuages Mannors Lands and Tenements to Us there belonging or which at any time hereafter shall or may belong Wee have ordained named constituted and appointed And for Us Our heires and Successors Doe ordain, name, constitute and appoint by these presents;
     Giving, and by these presents for Us Our heires and Successors granting unto the said Alexander Culpeper full power and authority to survey Our said Colony and Plantation of Virginia and the Bounds and limitts thereof; And to performe do and execute all and every other matter and thing belonging and appertaining to the said Office and Place of Surveyor Generall, according to such Orders & instructions as hee the said Alexander Culpeper shall from time to time receive from Us Our heires and Successors or from the Governor and Councell of Our said Plantation now and for the time being.
     TO have, hold, exercise and enjoy the said Office and Place of Our Surveyor Generall of Our Colony and Plantation of Virginia unto him the said Alexander Culpeper by himselfe or his sufficient Deputy or Deputies for and during Our Pleasure, with all ffees, profitts, priviledges, advantages and emoluments thereunto lawfully belonging and therewith heretofore usually received and enjoyed; and in as ample manner and forme as Thomas Loveing and Edmond Scarburgh or either of them or any other person or persons have formerly enjoyed the same.
     And wee do further by these presents Grant and Declare That these Our Lettrs. Patents or the Enrollment thereof shall bee in all things firme good and effectuall in the Law according to the true intent and meaning thereof. Notwithstanding the not reciting or mentioning any former Gift, Grant, Letters Patents or Estate heretofore made or granted of or in the premisses by Us or any of Our late Royall Progenitors to any person or persons whatsoever; and notwithstanding any other deficiency imperfection or want of forme in these presents contained, Or any Law, Statute, Ordinance, Proclamation, Provision, Restriction or other matter or thing whatsoever to the contrary thereof in any wise notwithstanding.
     Witness ourself at Westminster, vicesimo quinto die Octobris, anno regno nostro vicesimo, tertio [1671].
     By writ of Privy Seal.

It does not appear that the Surveyor General ever returned to the colony. His duty there was performed by deputies, first, Thomas Ludwell, and, later, Philip Ludwell of James City, VAl (brother-in-law No. 3), and his relation to Virginia affairs was henceforth chiefly in respect to his interest in the Northern Neck. But he appears several times in other relations to Virginia affairs. Following Bacon's Rebellion, Governor Berkeley consigned to him the indian queen of Wyanoke, when it appears that he was living at Leeds Castle, for it was there he lodged the pinchbeck majesty (Am. & W. I., 1677-80, No. 512). Again, when, in July, 1677, the old cavalier Governor was recalled and reached. England, so reduced by a 'tedious passage and griefe of mind to extreame weakness,' that he died without ever having seen the royal master he had served loyally, if not wisely, administration on the goods of 'Sir William Berkeley, late Governor of Virginia, but died at Twickenham, Middx the seat of his brother John, Lord Berkeley was granted to 'Alexander Culpeper, esq. natural and lawful brother of Dame Frances Berkeley, relict of deceased, during absence and to use of said Dame Frances Berkeley' (P.C.C. Admon. Act Book, 1677) ; and thereafter he vigorously defended Berkeley's official memory (Am. & W. 1., 1677-80, Nos. 374, 506, 512).

Except for the fact now evident, that he never married, that he held of the estate of Thomas Lord Culpeper a messuage or farm in Hollingbourne, known as Tot[nams, but lived at Leeds Castle in the household of the deserted chatelaine, Margaret, Lady Culpeper (House of Lords MS., 1695-97, ed. Hist. MSS. Com., ii, 533), little remains to record of the Surveyor General. (Actually, he did marry, see correction below)

That the planters came to resent his non-resident office holding appears from his petition to the Crown in 1678 (Va. Mag., xxiii, 397, 398), the direct attack upon him in the Assembly in 1691 (ibid., xxviii, 15) and his final complaint to the government on December 12, 1694, that Governor Nicholson had 'dispossessed him' of his office (Am. & W. I., 1693-94, No. 1593).48 This was the last act of his life. He was in London pushing a petition for redress when he died, just before Christmas, 1694. Once more Lady Culpeper journeyed up to town on a dead man's affairs: but this time it was to honour a faithful friend. She did for him what she did not deign to do for her husband: she brought his body back to Leeds Castle. He was buried in Bromfield, December 26, 1694, as 'Captain Alexander Culpeper of Leeds Castle'

Although the Northern Neck charter of 1669 recited his father's interest in the original Northern Neck grant of 1649 and subsequent death, Alexander did not then assert on the record a claim of inheritance of that interest. Following the example of his cousin, the second Lord Culpeper, he postponed such a claim until something might be made of it. The opportunity seemed to present itself in 1675 with the proposal of the Virginia colony to buy out the proprietary, and it was then, in the course of futile negotiations, that Alexander made his appearance as one of the proprietors of the Northern Neck, in a certificate (Burk, ii, Appendix, p. liv) by those who were named in the charter of 1669 that 'Thomas, Lord Culpeper, and Alexander Culpeper, Esq. by a collateral agreement with us do hold two-sixths part of the said grant.'

That this interest was kept alive also after the grant of the charter of 1688 appears from the recital of the proprietors by Philip Ludwell when he opened the Northern Neck land office in 1690 (N. N., I, passim), as

..."the Honorable Mistress Katherine Culpeper, sole daughter and heire of Thomas, late Lord Culpeper, & Allexr. Culpeper, Esqe., who cometh in part proprietor by lawfull conveyances from Thomas, late Lord Culpeper, and confirmed by the sd. Mistress Katherine Culpeper, who are now become the lone and lawful Proprietors of said tract or territory."

In this right, Alexander joined in the petition to the Crown, May 21, 1691, for confirmation of the charter of 1688, with the consequence that before his death his interest therein was officially recognised and adjudged by decree of the Privy Council (Acts P. C., Colonial, ii, 188).

The only thing his father had left him had thus become an hereditament to be disposed of by will; and, being now the last surviving male heir of the Feckenharn family, extant in England if not in fact, he felt free to make such a disposition of it as gratitude dictated. In doing this he defined his interest precisely. (Will set forth below)

By virtue of this will, of which no record was made in the colony, an undivided one-sixth interest in the Northern Neck remained a thing separate and apart from the other property rights in the proprietary to puzzle the Virginia lawyers a century later when they came to interpret the will of the last proprietor.

Correction and amplification by Warren Culpepper: Harrison was unaware that Alexander, late in his life, married his second cousin Judith Culpeper, daughter of John, 1st Lord Culpeper, and sister of Thomas, 2nd Lord Culpeper. Alexander, age 58, and Judith, age 53, were married on 19 Dec 1689 at the Church of St. Mary Magdalene, Old Fish Street in London. Thus the couple was living in Leed's Castle with Judith's sister-in-law, Margaret, Lady Culpeper. Judith died two years later and was buried on 21 Nov 1691. On 29 Nov 1691, Alexander wrote his last will and testament, and while he had no reason at that point to mention his recently deceased wife, he did leave his interest in the Northern Neck to his deceased wife's sister-in-law, Margaret who had invited them to live with her at Leeds Castle.6 
Will*29 Nov 1691 He made a will on 29 Nov 1691.

Alexander Culpeper of Hollingbourne, co. Kent, esq. All my goods to the Right Hon. the Lady Culpeper, Baroness Dowager of Thoresway, she to be extrix. Whereas, I am seized to me and my heirs of and in one full sixth part, the whole in six parts to be divided, of and in a certain tract of land in the Continent of America, called the Northern Neck of Virginia, under and by virtue of a grant thereof formerly made by his late Majty, King James II, to the Rt. Honble Thomas, Lord Culpeper, and his heirs forever, I do hereby give the said sixth part unto the said Rt. Honble Margaret, Lady Culpeper, widow and relict of the said Rt. Honble Thomas, Lord Culpeper, deceased, and to her heires for ever.
     Witns. Fairfax, John Cripps, Charles Pleydell.
     Prob. by Margaret Baroness Dowager of Thoresway, the extrix.7,8 
Death*24 Dec 1694 He died at London, England, on 24 Dec 1694. 
Burial26 Dec 1694 His body was interred on 26 Dec 1694 at Broomfield, co. Kent, England
Probate*5 Jan 1695 Probate action was taken on Alexander's estate on 5 Jan 1695 at co. Kent, England,

P.C.C. 3 Irby.8 
Will27 Nov 1779 He identified as the previous landowner(s) of land being bequeathed in the will of Thomas Fairfax Sixth Lord Fairfax of Cameron on 27 Nov 1779.9 
Biography He is referenced in a biographical note for Thomas Culpeper of the Middle Temple.10 

Family

Judith Culpeper (circa 1638 - circa 20 Nov 1691)
Marriage*19 Dec 1689 He married Judith Culpeper at St. Mary Magdalene, Old Fish Street, London, England, on 19 Dec 1689. 
ChartsThe 12th century Culpepers of England: Descendant Chart (16 generations, Males only)
Last Edited10 Sep 2016

Citations

  1. Col. F.W.T. Attree R.E./F.S.A. & Rev. J.H.L. Booker M.A., "The Sussex Colepepers, Part I", Sussex Archaeological Collections, XLVII,47-81, (1904)http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/sussex/default.htm.
  2. E-mail written 2007 to Warren Culpepper from Charles Andrew Grigsby, England, e-mail address.
    Transcription of Will of Sir Alexander Culpeper of Greenway Court Hollingbourne Kent 1649
    Ref: 422.
  3. Public Records Office, National Archives, London.
    Image of will at: /archives/uk/wills/images/Alexander_of_Greenway_Court_1649.pdf .
  4. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    P. C. C. Rivers, 157.
    Image:http://gen.culpepper.com/archives/uk/wills/images/Alexander_of_Greenway_Court_1645-1.pdf.
  5. Public Records Office, National Archives, London.
    Image of will at: /archives/uk/wills/images/Alexander_of_Greenway_Court_1645-1.pdf.
  6. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    Chapter 4b.
  7. Public Records Office, National Archives, London.
    Image of will at: /archives/uk/wills/images/Alexander_of_Hollingbourne_1695.pdf.
  8. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    P.C.C. Irby, 3., Will dated November 29, 1691 and proved January 5, 1694/5.
  9. Thomas, Sixth Lord Fairfax, Will, 1782
    Frederick W. B. 4: 583
    Will dated November 8, 1777
    Codicil dated November 27, 1779
    Proved May 5, 1782.
  10. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    Chapter 4: XIII Thomas Culpepper.

Anne Culpeper1

Female, #8475, (circa 1630 - 1695)
Father*Thomas Culpeper of the Middle Temple (s 1602 - s 1652)
Mother*Katherine St. Leger (c 1602 - 1658)
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Culpepper. 
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Colepeper. 
Birth*circa 1630 Anne was born at Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England, circa 1630. 
Baptism16 Sep 1630 She was baptized at Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England, on 16 Sep 1630.  
Death of Fathersay 1652 Her father Thomas Culpeper of the Middle Temple died say 1652 at Virginia
Married Namesay 1652  As of say 1652, her married name was Danby. 
Marriage*say 1652 She married Christopher Danby of Thorpe Perrow, co. Yorks. say 1652. 
Death of Mother1658 Her mother Katherine St. Leger died in 1658 at Maidstone, co. Kent, England
Death*1695 She died at Yorks, Yorkshire, England, in 1695.2 
Biography* She was baptized in Hollingbourne, September 16, 1630, as 'Anne, the dau. of Thomas Culpeper, esq.' Ralph Thoresby's pedigree of Danby of the West Riding of Yorkshire (Ducatus Leodiensis (1715), p. 202; Cf. also LeNeve, Book of Knights, Harl. Soc. Pub., viii, 436) shows Christopher Danby's marriage to 'Anne, d. of... second brother (sic) of John, Lord Colepepper.' Dr. Stanard's trained eye was the first to note (Va. Mag., i, 83) that this marriage took place in Virginia.
     Christopher Wandesford (1592-1640), who was lord deputy of Ireland for a few months following Strafford, had two daughters, Catherine, who married Sir Thomas Danby of Thorpe Perrow, and Alice (1627-1707), who married William Thornton of East Newton. Mrs. Thornton kept a diary, which has been edited for the Surtees Society (Publications, 1875, lxii, 139-224). Writing about 1668, she makes bitter complaint of the ingratitude of the wife of her nephew, Christopher Danby:
     "Thus did this woman requite my kindness.... I was forced to give of my disbursements for maintaining of herself, husband, and children on all accounts whatever for the space of twenty years: they being cast out of favor by Sir Thomas Danby on her inveighling his son to marry her in Virginia, and her pride afterwards."
     The editor for the Surtees Society records that this Anne Culpeper was buried at York in 1695. She apparently had descendants who returned to Virginia. Her son, Anstropus Danby of Farnley, Yorkshire, knighted 1691 and subsequently M. P., had P.C.C. Admon. November 20, 1703, on the estate of Thomas Goodrich, late of Virginia, infant, on the allegation that he was 'uncle on the mother's side and next of kin.' On this Dr. Stanard argues persuasively (Va. Mag., xx, 94) that this Thomas Goodrich was a grandson of Anne Culpeper: that she left a dau. who m. the Joseph Goodrich shown by the Essex (VA) records to have died ante. 1703, seized of lands in that county and leaving sons in the colony.2 
Research note*28 Apr 2011 Al Batts wrote Warren Culpepper regarding the descendants of Anne Culpeper Danby, "Please reference the following, which I posted on the James City Co., VA forum on Genealogy.com"

-------------------------------------

James City Co. will of Francelia (Danby) Sanderson Goodrich Parker - 1699

The following will is found in the Sir Abstrupus Danby Papers 1654-1706 (microfilm) at the Virginia Historical Society. I find few mentions of these names on-line, so I thought others might find it of interest. Francelia Danby m. 1st Edward Sanderson/Saunderson, 2nd Joseph Goodrich and 3rd Thomas Parker. Francelia's brother Sir Abstrupus Danby lived in England.

Will of Francelia Parker of Ja. Citty County. To loving son Danby Goodrich one island of land commonly called by the name of Hope Island; loving son Thomas Goodrich all the rest of my lands in generall belonging to me in Ja. Citty County. If either son to die without lawfully begotten heirs, their share to the surviving son. In case my two sons die without lawful [heirs], to my loving brother Abstrupus Danby [Sir Abstrupus Danby] all my lands in generall lying and being in Ja. City County. My two sons Thomas Goodrich and Danby Goodrich all the ????? money that now I have lying in my loving brother hands Sir Abstrupus Danby to be equally divided between them and to lye in my said brother hands untill they both come of age and the said money to run upon? interest…..my two sons Thomas and Danby dies before they come to lawful age, then I give and bequeath to my loving husband Thomas Parker what money soever lies in my loving brother hands with interest as above specified. The will also mentions legacies of "???? of gold amounting to ???????" and gold rings. The husband Thomas Parker is to enjoy the lands until the two sons come of age or until brother Sir Abstrupus Danby or his heirs shall demand as aforementioned. To my loving nephew Abstrupus Danby [son of Sir Abstrupus Danby] twenty shillings to buy him a ring. Ordain and appoint my loving husband Thomas Parker to be sole and whole executor of this my last will and testament. Dated: March 25, 1699. Signed and sealed in the presence of us Samuel Chappell, Willm Glover, Jonath Ogden.

The will above is not verbatim and is slightly abbreviated, but I think I covered the main points. Included in the Sir Abstrupus Danby papers are letters having to do with the will and whether or not Sir Abstrupus Danby was heir to the lands willed to him by his sister, and that Joseph Goodrich's eldest brother's son was claiming an interest in the lands due to Joseph and Francelia being tenants-in-common (prior to their marriage) under the will of Edward Sanderson. The letters state that sons Thomas Goodrich and Danby Goodrich both died in their infancy (within the margin are the dates, 13 Aug 1702 and 20 Jun 1703, which would appear to be the death dates for the two children) and that Joseph Goodrich died without a will. The letters state that Edward Sanderson died without issue and by will (within the margin is "Will dated ???? 1684") left all his lands there [Virginia?] in generall "whether purchased by him or otherwise patented and of which he was possessed to his said wife and to his friend Mr. Joseph Goodrich and their heirs forever and leaves them joynt executors". Widow Francelia (Danby) Sanderson afterwards married the said Joseph Goodrich. In the letters, the will of Francelia is referenced and within the margin is "Will dated 25 March 1699".

There are a number of James City Co. land grants for an Edward Sanderson, the latest being in 1668 and for 3,500 acres. Within this grant is mention of Hope Island, the property identified in the will above.3 

Family

Christopher Danby of Thorpe Perrow, co. Yorks. (1630 - )
Marriage*say 1652 She married Christopher Danby of Thorpe Perrow, co. Yorks. say 1652. 
Last Edited15 Jun 2011

Citations

  1. Col. F.W.T. Attree R.E./F.S.A. & Rev. J.H.L. Booker M.A., "The Sussex Colepepers, Part I", Sussex Archaeological Collections, XLVII,47-81, (1904)http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/sussex/default.htm.
  2. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm.
  3. E-mail written 28 Apr 2011 to Warren Culpepper from Al Batts Jr., e-mail address.

Frances Culpeper1

Female, #8476, (circa 1634 - after 31 May 1695)
Father*Thomas Culpeper of the Middle Temple (s 1602 - s 1652)
Mother*Katherine St. Leger (c 1602 - 1658)
Name Variation She was also known as Frances Culpepper. 
Name Variation She was also known as Frances Colepeper. 
Birth*circa 1634 Frances was born at Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England, circa 1634. 
Baptism27 May 1634 She was baptized at Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England, on 27 May 1634.  
Married Name1652  As of 1652, her married name was Stephens. 
Marriage*1652 She married Samuel Stephens of Warwick, VA in 1652. 
Married Name1670  As of 1670, her married name was Berkeley. 
Marriage1670 She married Sir William Berkeley Governor of Virginia in 1670. 
Married Name1680  As of 1680, her married name was Ludwell. 
Marriage1680 She married Philip Ludwell of James City, VA in 1680. 
Death*after 31 May 1695 She died after 31 May 1695.2 
Burial* Her body was interred at Jamestown Church Cemetery, Jamestown, James City Co., Virginia.3 
Biography* She was baptised in Hollingbourne, May 27, 1634, as 'Francis, dau. of Thomas Culpeper, esq. and Katherine his wife.' The earliest evidence for her in Virginia is the reference in the will of Samuel Filmer (1667, P.C.C. Penn, 58; cf. Va. Mag., xv, 181) to 'my friend and cousin Mrs. Frances Stephens wife of Mr. Samuel Stephens of Virginia.' Stephens' death and her subsequent m. to Sir William Berkeley are recited in a Virginia act of September, 1674 (Hening, ii, 322). Her final m. is reported in Lord Culpeper's letter to his sister in 1681 (Va. Hist. Register, iii, 192) ; and it was from the son of her third husband by an earlier m. who succeeded to Green Spring, that the Lees inherited her portrait which we reproduce. She was living in good health in her fifty-sixth year in July, 1690, as reported by William Byrd the elder (Va. Mag., xxvi, 128), but must have died soon after, for there is no mention of her in the will of her brother, Alexander (1691). She was buried in the church yard at Jamestown, where Dr. Tyler (Cradle of the Republic, p. 129) deciphered a fragment of her tombstone as follows: "...yeth the Bod... Lady Franc... eley..."

Dame Frances Berkeley appears in Virginia history a woman of high spirit, loyal and intensely partizan. When Col. Jeffreys and the other Commissioners reached Virginia to investigate her husband's conduct of the government during and after Bacon's Rebellion, she organized the 'Green Spring faction' to frustrate their politics and with the aid of Ludwell and Robert Beverley carried the Assembly along with her. The best of the anecdotes of this campaign is of her putting the common hangman up as an improvised postilion when the Governor's coach conducted the Commissioners away from a visit of ceremony at Greenspring (See Jeffreys' complaints in Am. & W. I., 1677-80, passim). At Leeds Castle the Historical MSS. Commission (Sixth Report, 465) brought to light a document in this quarrel–a. letter addressed to Berkeley, dated Virginia, August 2, 1677, and signed 'F. Berkeley,' It begins: 'My dear, dear Sir,' and, after some discussion of property in Jamaica, proceeds, 'as soon as your back was turned, the Lieut. Governor [Jeffreys] said he would lay 100 £ that you would not be permitted to see the King, but would be sent to the Tower.' On the date of this letter the Governor was already dead, but the news had not reached Virginia. It was her last message to her husband, and came into her brother's hands. Under Berkeley's will (Hening, ii, 558, in which she is described, six years after marriage, as 'my dear and most virtuous wife') she became one of the proprietors of Carolina. By a curious combination of circumstances she had the good fortune to sell this interest twice, in 1682 and again in 1684, and each time to be paid for it. The story is well told in McCrady, South Carolina under the Proprietary Government, p. 234.4 
News Article* Lady Berkeley Was A Formidable Colonial Force

Apart from Pocahontas, Lady Frances Berkeley, the strong-willed, thrice-married and childless Colonial dame who ruled the political roost in Virginia from around 1670 until her death in the 1690s, was the Old Dominion's most notable 17th century woman.
     Proud, imperious and fiercely partisan, Lady Berkeley was the sworn enemy of anyone who dared to question her own or her three husbands' aristocratic convictions. From the time of her first marriage when she was 18 until her death in her middle 60s, she was in the thick of the Virginia political melee. So much so that during the seven years of her married life to royal governor Sir William Berkeley, she became such a powerful behind-the-scenes factor that many blamed the blunders of her doddering husband on her none-too-subtle tugging at the governmental reins.
     Lady Berkeley came from an ancient English family accustomed to command. Her great-great-grandfather, Walter Culpeper (c. 1475-1516), was the Under Marshal of Calais. Also, her haughty cousin, Thomas, Lord Culpeper, was one of Virginia's less distinguished Colonial governors during the latter part of her life.
     The youngest of the five children of Thomas and Katherine (nee St. Leger) Culpeper, she was baptized in Hollingbourne Church, Kent, on May 27, 1634. Her father, one of the original proprietors of Virginia's Northern Neck, lost most of his English property during the British Civil War. After the execution of Charles I, he emigrated with his entire family to the Old Dominion in 1650.
     Two years later, when she was 18, Lady Frances became the wife of Samuel Stephens, governor of the Albemarle settlement in North Carolina and the owner of Roanoke Island, the site of Sir Walter Raleigh's Lost Colony.
     But Lady Frances never exchanged what few amenities Virginia then offered for the Carolina frontier and lived with Stephens at "Balthorpe," his Warwick County plantation until he died in 1669.
     Meanwhile, her vivacity and intelligence had attracted the attention of aging Virginia Gov. Sir William Berkeley (1606-1677), and six months after Stephens' death she became Lady Frances Berkeley and mistress of "Greenspring" in James City County, the finest country seat in English America.
     Later, in 1676, when Lady Frances' cousin, Nathaniel Bacon, headed a revolt against her husband, the latter sent her to England to enlist help in putting down the troubles headed by Bacon, whom Lady Frances branded as a liar and deep-dyed ingrate.
     When she returned in 1677, accompanied by 1,000 troups to restore order, she discovered not only had "Greenspring" been reduced to shambles by Bacon's henchmen, she also learned that their leader had died. Angered by her property losses and the shameful way her husband had been treated, Lady Frances became a leading light in the pro-Berkeley "Greenspring Faction" and in no time wholesale hangings and confiscation of "rebel" property became common.
     Later, when Charles II sent three commissioners to Virginia to look into the causes of the rebellion, Lady Frances openly flouted their authority. And this serves to introduce one of those anecdotes that throw a searchlight on the dry bones of history. Here is how Philip Alexander Bruce in his "Institutional History of Virginia in the Seventeenth Century" recounts the episode:
     "The Commissioners, sent out to Virginia to inquire into the sources of the insurrection of the previous year, had called at Greenspring, the home of Sir William Berkeley, whose bitter enmity they had incurred by their condemnation of his violent conduct in punishing the unfortunate followers of Bacon.
     "When they left the house, the Governor's coach was waiting at the door ready to convey them to Jamestown. Apparently they were to be the recipients of an attention worthy of their rank; after taking their seats within the vehicle, however, they observed to their indignant horror their postilion was the common hangman. As they drove away, they saw Lady Berkeley peeping at them in evident derision through a broken quarrel of glass in the window of her chamber."
     Even after Berkeley returned to England in 1677 to plead his case before Charles II, Lady Frances continued to be a thorn in the sides of the commissioners.
     Finally, when the news arrived at Jamestown that Sir William had died shortly after his return to London, she married Col. Philip Ludwell of "Rich Neck" plantation, her late husband's chief supporter, and remained a power behind the throne in the "Greenspring Faction" that continued to thwart successive attempts on the part of royal representatives to impose arbitrary measures on the Virginia colony.
     Interestingly, even though she took Ludwell as her third husband, Lady Frances never relinquished her title and she continued to be known and feared (or respected) as Lady Frances Berkeley until she died in the 1690s and was buried at Jamestown.
     In summing up her character, historian Jane D. Carson has this to say: "Opponents called her arrogant, grasping and devious, but friends trusted her and respected her judgment. Her letters, written with force and polish, reveal strength of character and proud integrity, personal warmth and tact, intense loyalty and affectionate regard for kinsmen and friends."5 
Biography She is referenced in a biographical note for John Culpeper son of Thomas & Katherine.6,4 

Family

Samuel Stephens of Warwick, VA (say 1631 - 1670)
Marriage*1652 She married Samuel Stephens of Warwick, VA in 1652. 
Last Edited31 Oct 2012

Citations

  1. Col. F.W.T. Attree R.E./F.S.A. & Rev. J.H.L. Booker M.A., "The Sussex Colepepers, Part I", Sussex Archaeological Collections, XLVII,47-81, (1904)http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/sussex/default.htm.
  2. Warren M. Billings, compiler, The Papers of Sir William Berkeley, 1605-1677, Richmond, Virginia: Library of Virginia, 2007.
    On 31 May 1695, Frances wrote a letter from Green Springs to her nephew, Sir Abstrupus Danby (son of her sister, Anne).
  3. Find a Grave (online database)
    http://www.findagrave.com
    Jamestown Church Cemetery, Jamestown, James City Co., Virginia
    + Frances Culpepper Berkeley, 68324648, 1634 – 1691 (sic).
  4. Warren M. Billings, compiler, The Papers of Sir William Berkeley, 1605-1677, Richmond, Virginia: Library of Virginia, 2007.
  5. Virginian-Pilot/Ledger-Star, Norfolk, VA.
    http://www.pilotonline.com
    George Tucker, 22 Feb 1999, Section: Local, Page: B3.
  6. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm.

John Lord Culpeper 1st Baron of Thoresway1

Male, #8477, (7 Aug 1599 - 11 Jul 1660)
Father*Thomas Culpeper of Wigsell (1561 - b 19 Sep 1613)
Mother*Anne Slaney (c 1575 - 20 Feb 1600/1)
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Culpepper. 
Note See the page for Thomas Lord Culpeper 2nd Baron of Thoresway for an article entitled "Four Lords, Not Enough Sons" which discusses the erroneous notion passed down to many modern-day Culpeppers that they are descended from Lord Culpeper of Virginia.2 
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Colepeper. 
Birth*7 Aug 1599 John was born at Wigsell, Salehurst, co. Sussex, England, on 7 Aug 1599. 
Baptism17 Aug 1600 He was baptized at Salehurst, co. Sussex, England, on 17 Aug 1600.  
Death of Mother20 Feb 1600/1 His mother Anne Slaney died on 20 Feb 1600/1.3 
Marriage*29 Oct 1628 He married Philippa Snelling at St. Botolph's, Bishopsgate, London, England, on 29 Oct 1628 at age 29. 
Birth of Son1629 His son Alexander Culpeper of Greenway Court was born in 1629.4 
Marriage*12 Jan 1631 He married Judith Culpeper on 12 Jan 1631 at age 31. 
Birth of Soncirca 1633 His son Thomas Culpeper was born circa 1633 at Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England
Death of Soncirca 24 Aug 1634 His son Thomas Culpeper died circa 24 Aug 1634 at Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England
Birth of Soncirca 1635 His son Thomas Lord Culpeper 2nd Baron of Thoresway was born circa 1635. 
Will14 Dec 1635 He is mentioned in the will of John Culpeper of Astwood in Feckenham, co. Worcs. on 14 Dec 1635.5 
Birth of Sonsay 1640 His son John Lord Culpeper 3rd Baron of Thoresway was born say 1640 at Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England
Birth of Soncirca 1642 His son Cheney Lord Culpeper 4th Baron of Thoresway was born circa 1642 at Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England
Will13 Jan 1644 He is mentioned in the will of Sir Alexander Culpeper of Greenway Court, Knight at Greenway Court, Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England, on 13 Jan 1644.6,7 
Will30 Jan 1644 He is mentioned in the will of Sir Alexander Culpeper of Greenway Court, Knight on 30 Jan 1644.8,9 
Death of Son2 Mar 1648/49 His son Alexander Culpeper of Greenway Court died on 2 Mar 1648/49 at London, England.4 
Birth of Son1652 His son Francis Culpeper was born in 1652 at Abroad
Will*3 Jul 1660 He made a will at co. Kent, England, on 3 Jul 1660.

John Lord Culpeper Baron of Thoresway. To be bur. in vault which Sir Thomas Culpeper (Sir Thomas Culpeper of Hollingbourne, the Elder, Knight) hath builded in Hollingbourne if convenient.
     Whereas His Majesty in answer to my petition Of 27 June last hath engaged his Royal word for payment of £2,000 out of his first receipts, for clearing of my paternal estate and towards paying portions to my younger children. And whereas there is due to me from Mr. William Longville & Mr. Robert Hales £1,500 which is secured to my brother Ralph Freke (Ralph Freke of Aldington in Thornham, co. Kent) for me by bond dat. 17 June 1660; and whereas there is due to me from Mr. Robert Peyton & Elizabeth Robinson widow £1,000
     To my daur. Elizabeth (Elizabeth Culpeper) in full of her portion £4,000 she to release her right in mtge made to her of manors of Morghue & Godden & of lands called Greenway Court, Kent, for payment of £1,300, & also her fourth part of manor of Kavenlite, co. Radnor, also her right in £300 debt due to her from Sir John Greenvill & such securities as sd. Sir J. Greenvill hath made to her or to Sir Edward Ford (Sir Edward Ford of Harting, co. Sussex) to her use, also her right to £750 which my exer or my brother Ralph Freke has already secured to her.
     To my daur Judith (Judith Culpeper) (besides the fourth part of manor of Kavenlite which I heretofore settled on her) £500 at her marriage with consent of my sister Lady Brooke (Elizabeth Culpeper), my brother Mr. William Cage (Sir William Cage of Bersted, Knight), & of my exer: also £1,500 out of His Majesty's debt.
     To my son John (John Lord Culpeper 3rd Baron of Thoresway) (besides his fourth part in sd. manor of Kavenlite & £50 annuity settled on him out of manor of Morghue & Greenway Court) £500, also £1,000 I enjoin him to make his brother Thomas (Thomas Lord Culpeper 2nd Baron of Thoresway) his exer in case he die under 21 or unmarried.
     To my son Cheney (Cheney Lord Culpeper 4th Baron of Thoresway) (beyond his quarter of manor of Kavenlite & of a £50 Annuity from manor of Morghue & Greenaway Court) £500 also £1,000 with same injunction as to his will.
     To my son Francis (Francis Culpeper) (beyond the £50 Annuity which I heretofore settled on him out of sd manor of Morghue & Greeneway Court) £1,000 at 21, also £1,000 more, out of King's Debt; but if he die under 21, exer discharged.
     To my daur Philipp (Philippa Culpeper (The Younger Sister)) in full lieu of her portion £500 also £500, both at her marriage, my exer to educate her until 18: also to her £1,000 out of King's debt.
     To my servant John Rowe for care of me in my sickness £120
     To Sir Edward Ford in whose house I now lie, for his trouble £200
     To the servants of his house £20.
     Rest of all debts owing to me, one particularly of £750 which Sir Thomas Culpeper owes me on mtge of parsonage of Hollingbourne to my Brother Ralph Freke in trust for me, also sums which I left at several times in hands of Mrs. Elizabeth Bridgman at Amsterdam, as appears by her letter of 10 June; & all other goods, to my exer towards disburthening & repurchasing of my estate sold during the late troubles by the then pretended authority at any time since 1643.
     I beg His Majesty towards redeeming of my distressed family & estate from ruin. His Majesty will take order with his Court of Exchequer that the whole debt of £12,000 may be punctually paid to my exer.
     My eldest son & heir Thomas C. to be exer.
     Witns. J. Hamilton (James Hamilton Groom of the Chamber to Charles II), Edmund Gibbon, Alexander Culpeper (Alexander Culpeper of Greenway Court), John Hatton, Nicholas Myram, Richard Halfhedd.
Codicil. All my real estate to my eldest son Thomas C. in fee; & whereas I am seised of divers maners & lands in co. Kent which may be Gavelkind, I leave all these to my sd. eldest son Thomas C. in fee. Witns. Tho. Pordage, A. Culpeper, Jo. Collyns, J. Reves.
Prob. per juramenturn Domini Thomae Culpeper filii... et exoris.10 
Death*11 Jul 1660 He died at co. Kent, England, on 11 Jul 1660 at age 60.10 
Probate*3 Aug 1660 Probate action was taken on John's estate on 3 Aug 1660 at co. Kent, England.10 
Biography John Culpeper (also spelled Colepeper and Culpepper; died 11 Jun 1660), was an English statesman and an influential counselor of Charles I during the Civil War and of Charles II in exile.
Elected member for Kent in the Long Parliament, he took the popular side, supporting the Earl of Strafford's attainder and receiving an appointment to the Parliamentary committee of defense in 1641. He separated, however, from the popular party on the church question, opposing the proposals to abolish episcopacy and for religious union with the Scots. In 1642 he joined the King's supporters, taking office as chancellor of the exchequer, but he disapproved of Charles's attempted arrest of five members of the Commons. In the Oxford Parliament he advised concessions to secure peace. He received a peerage in 1644.
Culpeper was sent with Edward Hyde (afterward earl of Clarendon) in charge of the Prince of Wales, after Charles's final defeat in 1645, to the Scilly Isles and thence to France (1646). In 1648 he accompanied the Prince on his unsuccessful naval expedition and returned with him to The Hague. After Charles I's execution he pressed upon Charles II the acceptance of the Scots' proposals. The treaty between Oliver Cromwell and Cardinal Mazarin in 1654 compelled Culpeper to leave France for Flanders. At the Restoration he returned to England but lived only a few weeks.11 
Biography* Sir John Culpeper, first baron Culpeper of Thoresway, (and the First Lord Culpeper) was baptised in Salehurst, August 7, 1600, as 'Johanes Colepeper, filius Mri Thomae, armigeri'; was named by his maternal grandmother, Dame Margaret Slaney in her will (1612) as 'my godson John C. another of the sons of my dau. Anne C.,' as well as in her codicil (May, 1618) in the language already quoted; and, in the inq. p.m. of Slaney C. (May, 1619) appears as 'John C. his only brother and heir, and heir of the body of said Thomas by Anne his wife; and is at taking of this inq. under :21, viz: 18 years, 9 months and 9 days and no more.'

He matriculated at Oxford from Hart Hall, April 26, 1616, as 'of Sussex, aged 15' (Foster) and was admitted to the Middle Temple, February 6, 1617/8, as 'Mr. John C., second son of Thomas C. of Wigsell, Sussex, deceased (Hopwood, ii, 625). Having become, by the death of his elder brother in December, 1618, 'primi sternmatis Wigsellensis' (as he later described himself on the MI. of his first wife), he was knighted by James I at Theobald's, January 14, 1621/2 (Nichols, iii, 751).

Clarendon testifies that he 'never cultivated the muses.' If he ever had any intention of pursuing a career at the bar in the tradition of his uncle, John of Feckenham, he abandoned it when he became 'of Wigsell.' Being just of age as he was knighted, and having no home ties, he forthwith prepared to spend 'some years of his youth in foreign parts and especially in armies, ' and to that end liquidated his property.

He had inherited his father's share in the Virginia Company and had already taken a part in the politics of that society (in April, 1623, he allied himself with the Warwick faction, Brown, Genesis, 982), when at the court held May 7, 1623, 'Mr. Deputy propounded the passing of One Share from Sir John Culpeper to Mr. ffreake of the Middle Temple, gentleman' (Records of the London Company, L. C. ed., p. 412). In the same year, 1623 (Close Roll, 21 Jac. I, pt. 26) he sold Wigsell to Sir Thomas C. to be vested in his eldest son, Cheney. It would thus seem that Sir John must have left England in the autumn of 1623; for there is no further record of his until October, 1628, when he. contracted his first marriage. It was accordingly after five years of soldiering in the wake of Gustavus Adolphus that, as Clarendon says, 'in very good season and after a small waste of his fortune' lie returned to England, 'retired from that course of life and married and 'betook himself to a country life.' He now established himself in Hollingbourne (he describes himself 'of Hollingbourne' in his mar. lic., 1631, and is so described again in the Commonwealth act of 1650, and, under the influence of Sir Thomas, commenced politician. To quote Clarendon again, his school was county affairs, 'the business of the country and the concernments of it, in which he was very well versed: and being a man of sharpness of parts and volubility of language he was frequently made choice of to appear at the Council board in those matters which related to the country, in the managing whereof his abilities were well taken notice of.' The result was that he was returned (Official Returns of M. Ps. 1878) to the Short Parliament (1640) as burgess for Rye (Cinq Port). In the Long Parliament he was Knight of the shire for Kent and made his celebrated speech against monopolies (Rushworth, iv, 133).

The remainder of his career is part of the history of England. His fundamental conservatism soon drew him into opposition to the crescent 'reforming party.' In the small company of Falkland and Hyde he stood at last by the bishops and against the Grand Remonstrance; with the result that all three were invited by Charles I to join the government. On January 2, 1642, Culpeper was sworn of the Privy Council and appointed Chancellor of the Exchequer, which office he exchanged the following year for that of Master of the Rolls. Notwithstanding these dignities, 'as his courage was always unquestionable,' when war came he did service also in the field: at Edgehill (Keinton) he charged with Rupert's cavalry, acquitting 'himself like a brave man-at-arms,' and at Newbury again 'enobled his Gowne with Martiall Achievements.' For the example of these acts, as well as his service in the Council Chamber, the King raised him to the peerage in 1644; but in so doing 'did much dissatisfy both the court and the army.' Clarendon's own comment (Rebellion, v, 4) is that 'though he did imprudently in desiring it, did deserve it.' In 1645 he became, with Hyde, a member of the Council set up in the west of England for the Prince of Wales; and eventually escorted his young master from Cornwall to Scilly. Thence Culpeper left to join the Queen mother in Paris: and so began his long wanderjahr on the continent.

During the exile, the future fortunes of Culpeper's family were shaped by two lawyer-drawn papers. On September 18, 1649, he and his cousin-german Thomas Culpeper (son of John of Feckenham) were included in the patent which created the proprietary of the Northern Neck of Virginia; and in 1651 the Commonwealth by act of Parliament (Acts, 1651, c., 10) declared forfeited and ordered sold all the manors and estates of 'Sir John Culpeper, late of Hollingbourne in the County of Kent, Knight:' a description which was intended for an insult by disregarding the warborn peerage.

Culpeper survived to take part, at the age of sixty, in Charles II's entry into London. After that dramatic 'ride in triumph through Persepolis' he was destined for a large part in the restoration government (see Ranke's comment on him) ; actually he assumed his function as Master of the Rolls (swearing in, in that capacity, his old colleague Hyde as Lord Chancellor), and for some weeks sat regularly at the Council board. But in June of the restoration year he fell ill, while he 'lay' at Hartinge, co. Sussex, in the house of his friend, Sir Edward Ford, whose daughter his dead son Alexander, had married. Weary after more than ten years of exile, he planned here a settlement of his disordered estate. His English property had been sequestered and sold and he was deeply in debt. 'He used to say,' his son reported later (Gent. Mag., lxvii (1797) p. 477) 'that the usurer and he were not yet even; for he had only scratched the usurer, the usurer had stabbed him.' He was, however, comforted by a promise from the King of a grant sufficient to put his house in order; and, quite unconscious of the part that promise was to play in the history of Virginia, died on July 11, 1660 [the date is on his MI.], having made the following will (See Culpepper Connections Archives)

It does not appear from the Hollingbourne register that he was buried there, but in 1695 two of his children then surviving erected in Hollingbourne church a monument with the following MI.:

'To the lasting memory of John, Lord Culpeper, Baron of Thoresway, Master of the Rolles and Privy Counsellor to two Kings, Charles the First and Charles the Second. For equal fidelity to the King and Kingdome he was most exemplary. And in an exile of above ten years was a constant attendant and upright Minister to the Prince last mentioned. With him he returned tryumphant into England on the 29th of May 1660; but died the 11th of July next following in the 61st year of his age to the irreparable loss of his family. He commended his soul to God his faithful Creator, and ordered his body here to expect a blessed Resurrection. His Patent of Honour from King Charles the First dated the 21st of October 1644 may serve for his immortal Epitaph. Part whereof is here below faithfully copyed from the Latine original & translated into English: [the latin text, which follows, is here omitted]

'Whereas our well beloved and most faithful Counsellor John Culpeper Kt. Mr. of the Rolles of our Chancery, of the Antient and Noble family of the Culpepers in our Counties of Kent and Sussex many ages past renowned for persons of eminent ability both in War and Peace, hath given us signall testimonies of his approved Loyalty, singular Manhood, and profound judgment; who, in that never to be forgotten Battell of Keinton, where both our own and the publick safety were manifestly at stake, being then chancellor of our Exchequer, acquitted himselfe like a brave man-at-arms; who, at Newberry, and on other occasions always enobled his Gowne with Martiall Achievements; and lastly, who, in our most perilous junctures by his seasonable and solid Counsells hath been a principal support of our Crowne and Dignity, &c.'

'By his wife Judith, daughter of Sir John (sic) Culpeper of Hollingbourne Kt. he had 7 children that survived him, Thomas, later Lord Culpeper, John now Lord Culpeper, Cheney, Frances, Elizabeth, widow of James Hamilton Esq. late Groom of the Bedchamber to King Charles the Second, Judith, and Philippa. Of these John Lord Culpeper and Elizabeth Hamilton, equally zealous of expressing their Duty, have on the 10th day of June in the year 1695 erected this Monument.5
Biography John Culpeper, first Lord Culpeper (d. 1660), was the only son of Sir John Culpeper of Wigsell, Sussex, and Elizabeth Sedley. (Hasted, History of Kent, ii. 476)

According to Clarendon he spent 'some years of his youth in foreign parts, and especially in armies, where he had seen good service and very well observed it, and might have made a very good officer.' (Clarendon, Life, ii. 10)

Returning to England he married Philippa, daughter of Sir John Snelling, and after his marriage, ‘betook himself to a country life, and studied the business of the country and the concernments of it, in which he was very well versed; and being a man of sharpness of parts and volubility of language, he was frequently made choice of to appear at the council board in those matters which related to the country, in the managing whereof his abilities were well taken notice of’.

Having thus become popular, he was in 1640 elected to the Long parliament as second of the two members for Kent. In the Long parliament on 9 Nov 1640, he distinguished himself by a great speech against monopolies; was ordered on 12 Feb 1641 to impeach Judge Berkeley on behalf of the commons; took part in the proceedings against Stafford, and spoke on behalf of the bill of attainder. He was also a member of the committee of defense appointed by the commons on 14 Aug 1641. (Gardiner, History of England, x. 2)

Nevertheless, even during the first session, his divergence from the leaders of the popular party was considerable. He opposed the acceptance of the London petition against episcopacy (8 Feb) and the demands of the Scots for religious union. When the House of Commons went into committee to discuss the latter subject, Culpeper was placed in the chair in order to silence him in the debate (17 May). On 11 Jun he moved an important amendment to the Root and Branch Bill, and on 1 Sept. brought forward a resolution in defense of the prayer-book (ib. ix. 281, 377, x. 14). Thus it was specially on religious questions that Culpeper separated himself from the popular party. Clarendon thus explains his attitude: "In matters of religion he was in his judgment very indifferent, but more inclined to what was established, to avoid the accidents which commonly attend a change, without any motives from his conscience, which yet he kept to himself, and was well content to have it believed that the activity proceeded from thence." (Life, ii. 12).

In the second session he opposed the Grand Remonstrance, and attempted to enter his protest against its being printed. He also spoke against the Militia Bill and against the declaration proposed by Pym to refuse toleration to the Irish Catholics (Gardiner, x. 76, 96). So soon, therefore, as the king decided to confer office on the leaders of his party in the commons, Culpeper became a member of the privy council and chancellor of the exchequer (2 Jan 1642, ib. x. 127). The king's attempt to seize the five members was made without his privity, and, like Hyde and Falkland, he was 'much displeased and dejected' thereby (Clarendon, Rebellion, iv.158).

But it was in accordance with Culpeper's advice, although mainly owing to the influence of the queen, that the king gave his assent to the bill for the exclusion of the bishops from the House of, Lords (13 Feb 1642, Clarendon, Life, ii. 18). It was also by Culpeper's sole advice, given without the knowledge of Falkland or Hyde, that Charles formed the design of removing to the north of England with the object of obtaining possession of Hull (ib. ii. 17). After the king left London, Culpeper continued to meet Hyde and Falkland at Hyde's lodgings to prepare the king's answers to the messages of the parliament and concert plans for his service, in spite of the warning that the parliamentary leaders intended to send all three to the Tower (ib. ii. 38-9).

Escaping this fate by his precautions, he remained in London till about the end of May, and then joined the king at York. He was one of the councillors who signed their names to the declaration professing their belief that the king had no intention of making war on the parliament (15 June), and to the promise not to obey any order not warranted by the known laws of the land, or any ordinance concerning the militia not assented to by the king (13 June, Husbands, Exact Collection, 1643, 350, 367).

In company with the Earl of Southampton and two others, Culpeper was dispatched from Nottingham on 26 Aug 1642 to hear the king's last offer to negotiate before the war began. He was refused permission to address the house from his seat, and obliged to deliver his message from the bar. ' There standing bareheaded,' says D'Ewes, ‘he looked so dejectedly as if he had been a delinquent rather than a member of the house, or privy counselor, or a messenger from his majesty (Sanford, Studies and Illustrations, 529).

Culpeper was present at Edgehill, where he charged with Prince Rupert, and vehemently opposed those who urged the king to retreat under cover of the darkness instead of holding his ground (Clarendon, Rebellion, Appendix 2Y). In December following the post of master of the rolls be came vacant, and the king appointed Culpeper to fill it, intending Hyde to fill his place as chancellor of the exchequer. But Culpeper, though he professed much friendship, had no mind he should be upon the same level with him, and believed he would have too much credit in the council.'

Accordingly, although installed as master of the rolls on 28 Jan 1643 (Black Docquets of Letters Patent signed by Charles I at Oxford, 2), he delayed the surrender of the chancellorship of the exchequer as long as possible (22 Feb 1643), and even after it persuaded the king to infringe the prerogatives of that office by a grant to Mr. Ashburnham. Nevertheless, though this caused considerable cool ness between Hyde and Culpeper, ‘it never brake out or appeared to the disturbance or prejudice of the king's service’ (Clarendon, Life, ii. 77, iii. 31).

In the Oxford parliament Culpeper played a considerable part, being one of the two privy councillors who were included in it (Clarendon, Rebellion, Appendix 3Y). It was believed in London that he took up an attitude of opposition, moved that peace propositions should be sent to Westminster, and urged the sacrifice of Digby and other obnoxious councillors (Gardiner, History of the Great Civil War, i. 351). His influence with the king in military affairs roused the hostility of the generals (Clarendon, Rebellion, viii. 28-93).

He was particularly charged with advising the siege of Gloucester; ‘all conspired to lay the whole reproach upon the master of the rolls, who spake most in those debates, and was not at all gracious to the soldiers’ (ib. vii. 239). Rupert in consequence ‘crossed all he proposed,’ and Wilmot plotted a petition of officers that he might be excluded from all councils of war (ib. viii. 96, 168). Hence, when the king created the master of the rolls Lord Culpeper of Thoresway in Lincolnshire (21 Oct 1644, Dugdale, Baronage, ii. 472), ‘it did much dissatisfy both the court and army’ (Clarendon, Rebellion, viii. 170).

The parliament also, when Culpeper was appointed one of the commissioners for the Uxbridge treaty, refused to recognize his new dignity (Whitelocke, ff. 125-6).

In March 1645, Charles appointed Culpeper one of the council of the Prince of Wales, effected a reconciliation between him and Hyde, and dispatched both with the prince to the west of England. A large amount of his correspondence with Goring and other royalist commanders during the disastrous campaign of 1645 is preserved in the Clarendon Papers and the Tanner MSS.

In August the king sent for Culpeper to Brecon, and there commissioned him in case of danger to convey the prince to France, a destination which later letters altered to Denmark. The council, including Culpeper, remonstrated and urged the king to select Scilly or Jersey as a refuge for the prince when all hope of holding out in Cornwall was lost (Clarendon, Rebellion, 74,112, 116).

Culpeper himself hoped still to get aid from Scotland, and with that object procured the liberation of the Duke of Hamilton from his imprisonment (ib. Appendix 4 0).

He urged Ashburnham to ‘bend all his wits to advance the treaty with the Scots. It is the only way to save the crown and the three kingdoms; all other tricks will deceive you. All they can ask, or the king part with, is a trifle in respect of the price of a crown’ (Clarendon State Papers, n. 188).

A few days later (2 Mar 1646) he was forced to embark with the prince for Scilly, whence he was sent to France to inform the queen of her son's position and needs. The queen won over Culpeper to the view that the prince's removal to France was absolutely necessary and when the rest of the prince's council determined to remain in Jersey, he alone decided to accompany Prince Charles to France. Apart from distrust of France, the chief reason was that the policy of making religious concessions to gain the Scots, which was advocated by the queen and by Mazarin, commended itself to Culpeper while it was disapproved by Hyde and the others (Clarendon, Rebellion).

From St. Germain Culpeper, in joint letters with Jermyn and Ashburnham, continued to press this policy on the king (Clarendon State Papers, ii. 271).

"As for your advice," replied the king to one of these letters, "you speak my soul in everything but one; that is, the church" (ib. ii. 243).

And in an earlier letter to the queen, Charles wrote: "As for Culpeper, I confess never much to have esteemed him in religion, though in other things I reverenced his judgment" (Bruce, Letters of Charles I in 1646, 30).

They also urged the king to retain at all costs his right to the militia, and neither to suffer himself to be handed over to the parliament without security for his safety, nor to leave his own dominions (Clarendon State Papers, ii. 301). Sir John Berkeley's mission to England in the following year to promote an agreement between the king and the army was largely the work of Culpeper (Berkeley, Memoirs; Masères Tracts, 356).

On the revolt of a portion of the fleet in the summer of 1648, Culpeper accompanied the prince to sea, and was his principal adviser. The failure of this expedition to achieve anything was generally attributed to him, and some accused him of corruption.

Clarendon repels this charge: "He was not indeed to be wrought upon that way, but having some infirmities and a multitude of enemies, he was never absolved from anything of which any man accused him." (Rebellion, xi. 82).

Lord Hatton, however, writing to Nicholas, goes so far as to say: "I am sure I saw him plot and design against the relieving Pembroke and Colchester, and endeavor what in him lay to hinder any commission to the Duke of Buckingham unless he would be solely under the Earl of Holland and declare for the covenant and such popular ways" (Nicholas Papers, 96).

On the return of the prince to the Hague the old quarrel between Culpeper and Prince Rupert broke out again, and was industriously inflamed by Herbert, the attorney-general. On one occasion, when Rupert in the council nominated a certain Sir Robert Walsh as agent for the sale of prize goods, Culpeper, who opposed the appointment, concluded by offering to fight Rupert, but the intervention of Hyde and Cottington induced him to apologize a few days later (Clarendon, Rebellion, xi. 128).

Walsh, however, instigated by Herbert, violently assaulted Culpeper in the streets on 23 Oct 1648, and was for that offence forbidden to appear at court and banished from the Hague (Carte, Ormonde, vi. 592; Clarendon, xi. 130).

After the execution of the king, Culpeper was one of the chief supporters of the Scotch proposals to Charles II (June 1649; Nicholas Papers, 135).

When Charles II decided to go to Ireland instead of Scotland, Culpeper was sent to Russia to borrow money from the czar, and succeeded in obtaining a loan of twenty thousand rubles in corn and furs. An account of his reception at Moscow (May 1650) is printed in the Nicholas Papers (182-5).

Shortly after his return he was, by the influence of Lord Jermyn and the queen, to whose party he still belonged, sent to Holland as agent for Charles II, to the hope of obtaining armed support from the United Provinces, then (June 1650) at war with England (Clarendon State Papers, iii. 106).

It was also intended to despatch him to Scotland in 1654, but this mission came to nothing (ib. iii. 225).

By the treaty of August 1654 between Cromwell and Mazarin (Guizot, Cromwell, ii. 468) it was stipulated that Culpeper should be expelled from French territory, and he seems to have spent the rest of his exile in Flanders. From occasional notices in Clarendon's correspondence he appears to have been in more prosperous circumstances than most of the royalists.

On the death of Cromwell, Culpeper wrote a remarkable letter to Hyde (20 Sept. 1658) on the policy to be adopted by the royalist party (Clarendon State Papers, iii. 412).

He urged that the English royalists should be kept quiet until the divisions of the republicans brought the true season for activity; meanwhile he advised him to apply secretly to the discontented officers and statesmen, but especially to Monck.

"The person that my eye is chiefly on, as alone able to restore the king and not absolutely averse to it neither in his principles nor affections, is Monk;" and he went on to point out the way to deal with him, and to predict with astonishing foresight the probable course of events.

In September 1659, Culpeper followed the king to the south of France during the unsuccessful attempt of Charles to obtain some advantage from the treaty of the Pyrenees. Several letters written by Culpeper during this journey are among the Egerton MSS. (Eg. 2536). At the Restoration he returned to England, but died in the same summer (11 June 1660; Kennet, Register).

Culpeper’s character is described at length by Clarendon (I, ii. 10; Rebellion, iv. 122) and Sir Philip Warwick (Memoirs, 196). Both agree in praising his ability in debate and his fertility in counsel, and complain of a certain irresolution and changeableness which prevented him adhering to his first conclusions.

Both agree also in the statement that the uncertainty of his temper greatly diminished his usefulness. Clarendon in his correspondence frequently speaks of the difficulty of doing business with him. Nicholas echoes the same charge (Nicholas Papers, 315), and Warwick talks of his ‘eagerness and ferocity.’ This was largely the result of his education. When he came to court, says Clarendon, ‘he might very well be thought a man of no good breeding, having never sacrificed to the Muses or conversed to any polite company."

Culpeper's estates were restored by a private act passed after his death (Kennet, Register, 255). By his first wife he had one son, who died young, and a daughter, Pliilippa, who married Sir Thomas Herlackenden. By his second wife, Judith, daughter of Sir T. Culpeper of Hollingbourne, Kent, he had seven children, of whom Thomas, the eldest, became his successor in the title, which passed to his two younger brothers John and Cheney, and became extinct on the death of the last in 1725 (Hasted, Kent; Collins, Peerage, ix. 422).12 
Biography He is referenced in a biographical note for Alexander Culpeper Surveyor General of VA.13 
Will12 Aug 1710 He is mentioned in the will of John Lord Culpeper 3rd Baron of Thoresway on 12 Aug 1710.14,15 
Biography He is referenced in a biographical note for Thomas Culpeper of the Middle Temple.16 

Family 1

Philippa Snelling (1610 - before 16 Sep 1630)
Marriage*29 Oct 1628 He married Philippa Snelling at St. Botolph's, Bishopsgate, London, England, on 29 Oct 1628 at age 29. 
Children

Family 2

Judith Culpeper (circa 1606 - Nov 1691)
Marriage*12 Jan 1631 He married Judith Culpeper on 12 Jan 1631 at age 31. 
Children
ChartsDiana, Princess of Wales: Culpeper Ancestral Chart
The 12th century Culpepers of England: Descendant Chart (16 generations, Males only)
Last Edited1 Jan 2012

Citations

  1. Col. F.W.T. Attree R.E./F.S.A. & Rev. J.H.L. Booker M.A., "The Sussex Colepepers, Part I", Sussex Archaeological Collections, XLVII,47-81, (1904)http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/sussex/default.htm.
  2. Warren L. Culpepper (#1942), Former publisher of Culpepper Connections, e-mail address.
  3. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    P.C.C. 79 Capell Chancery Inq. P.M. 1614 No. 53.
  4. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    Chapter 3b.
  5. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm.
  6. E-mail written 2007 to Warren Culpepper from Charles Andrew Grigsby, England, e-mail address.
    Transcription of Will of Sir Alexander Culpeper of Greenway Court Hollingbourne Kent 1649
    Ref: 422.
  7. Public Records Office, National Archives, London.
    Image of will at: /archives/uk/wills/images/Alexander_of_Greenway_Court_1649.pdf .
  8. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    P. C. C. Rivers, 157.
    Image:http://gen.culpepper.com/archives/uk/wills/images/Alexander_of_Greenway_Court_1645-1.pdf.
  9. Public Records Office, National Archives, London.
    Image of will at: /archives/uk/wills/images/Alexander_of_Greenway_Court_1645-1.pdf.
  10. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    P. C. C. Nabbs, 235.
    Will dated July 3, 1660.
    Codicil dated July 9, 1660.
    Proved August 6, 1660.
  11. Britannica Online.
  12. The Dictionary of National Biography. The Concise Dictionary. Part 1, From the beginnings to 1900. London: Oxford University Press, 1953.
  13. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    Chapter 4b.
  14. Public Records Office, National Archives, London.
    Will of John 3rd Lord Culpeper, dated 12 Aug 1710, transcribed by Charles Andrew Grigsby. Image at: http://gen.culpepper.com/archives/uk/wills/images/John_Baron_of_Thoresway_1719-1.pdf and
    http://gen.culpepper.com/archives/uk/wills/images/John_Baron_of_Thoresway_1719-2.pdf.
  15. E-mail written 2007 to Warren Culpepper from Charles Andrew Grigsby, England, e-mail address.
  16. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    Chapter 4: XIII Thomas Culpepper.
  17. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    Chapter 3c.

Thomas Lord Culpeper 2nd Baron of Thoresway1,2

Male, #8478, (circa 1635 - 27 Jan 1689)
Father*John Lord Culpeper 1st Baron of Thoresway2 (7 Aug 1599 - 11 Jul 1660)
Mother*Judith Culpeper2 (c 1606 - Nov 1691)
Note* Four Lords, Not Enough Sons
By Warren Culpepper

A discussion of the widespread belief that some American
Culpeppers are descended from Lord Culpeper of Virginia.


Introduction
From childhood, I heard from my father that we were descended from Lord Culpeper of Virginia. He had determined this by retaining a professional genealogist to trace our family's roots. I never saw the document that was produced, and don't know the identity of the genealogist, However, until I started a serious pursuit of genealogy, I never had any reason to doubt the claim.

In discussions with other Culpepper descendants that I've met as a result of creating this web site, I have discovered that quite a few other Culpepper families have held the belief that they were descended from Lord Culpeper. However, a review of very well-documented research indicates that any Culpepper claim of Lord Culpeper ancestry is a myth.

There were actually four Lord Culpepers, but only one of them, Thomas, Lord Culpeper, Second Baron of Thoresway, ever lived in America.

Modern-day Culpeppers should be heartened by the fact that they are not descended from a man whose character was viewed so poorly by both his peers and historians:

     Hartwell, Chilton and Blair (1696) 'one of the most cunning and covetous men in England.'
     Beverley (1705, i, 80) 'he had the art of mixing the good of the Country with his own particular Interest.'
     Bishop Burnet (1723, i, 798) 'A vicious and corrupt man, but made a figure in the debates.'
     Chalmers (1782) 'having shown by his conduct that they who act under independent authority will seldom obey even reasonable commands, no more governors were appointed for life.'
     Bancroft (1837, ii, 246) 'He had no high-minded regard for Virginia: he valued his office and his patents only as property... yet Culpeper was not singularly avaricious. His conduct was in harmony with the principles which prevailed in England. As the British merchant claimed the monopoly of colonial commerce, as the British manufacturer valued Virginia only as a market for his goods, so the British Courtiers looked to appointments in America as a means of enlarging their own revenues or providing for their dependants. Nothing but Lord Culpeper's avarice gives him a place in American history.'
     Lodge (1881, p., 23) 'Culpeper's sole object was extortion, which he freely practised... Culpeper's administration was, as a whole, one of simple greed and violent exaction, varied by an extensive swindle in raising and lowering the value of the coin.'
     Doyle (1882, i, 259) 'His worst fault was rapacity, of which he stands convicted both by general tradition and certain specific actions.'
     Wertenbaker (1914, p. 239) 'Few British colonial Governors are less deserving of respect than Thomas, Lord Culpeper.'

In addition, his personal life was equally flawed, having spent most of his adult years with his mistress Susanna Willis, in spite of his marriage to Marguerite Van Hesse.

The four Lord Culpepers are identified below. The text associated with each name is exerpted from more detailed narratives written by Fairfax Harrison in The Proprietors of the Northern Neck. A study of this text should help remove any lingering doubts as to the possibility of any modern-day Culpepper being a descendant of any of the four Lord Culpepers.

1st Baron of Thoresway: Sir John Culpeper (1600-1660) of Wigsell and Hollingbourne. John inherited his father's share of ownership in the Virginia Company in 1617, and at the age of 21, was knighted by King James I (which gave him the title of "Sir"). In 1644, he was raised to the peerage, becoming the First Baron of Thoresway (which gave him the title of "Lord"). He became one-seventh proprietor of the Northern Neck of Virginia under the charter of 1649. He never lived in the colonies. and had seven children that survived him: Thomas (2nd Lord Culpeper), John (3rd Lord Culpeper), Cheney (4th Lord Culpeper), Frances, Elizabeth, Judith, and Philippa.

2nd Baron of Thoresway: Thomas Culpeper (1635-1689) of Leeds Castle. Thomas succeeded upon his father's death in 1660 as the second Lord Culpeper. He was a Member of the Council for Foreign Plantations, 1671-1674. Governor of Virginia, 1677-1683; Proprietor of the Northern Neck under charters of 1669 and 1688; viz: one-sixth until 1681, and thereafter, five-sixths. Proprietor of all Virginia under the Arlington charter of 1673; viz. one-third, 1673-1681, and the whole, 1681-1684, when he surrendered to the Crown. He was, however, in the colony only during two brief tours, from May to August, 1680, and from December, 1682, to May, 1683. He had three daughters and no sons. The only child from his marriage was, Catherine, who married Thomas, Lord Fairfax. His other two daughters, Susanna and Charlotte, were by his mistress Susanna Willis.

3rd Baron of Thoresway: John Culpeper (1641-1719). John succeeded upon his brother's death in 1689 as the third Lord Culpeper. He married his cousin Frances (1664-1740) daughter of Sir Thomas Culpeper the younger, of Hollingbourne. He never lived in the colonies, and he died childless.

4th Baron of Thoresway: Cheney Culpeper (1642-1725). Cheney gained notoriety in the roaring days of the Restoration when he killed an officer of the guards with a blunderbuss and was pardoned only because he was brother to a peer. He succeeded upon his brother's death in 1719 as Fourth Lord Culpeper. He never lived in the colonies. There is no record of a marriage, and when he died without a surviving son, the Culpeper peerage became extinct.

And with Cheney, Lord Culpeper's death, so dies the possibility of any further Culpepper descendants of any Lord Culpeper.3 
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Colepeper. 
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Culpepper. 
Birth*circa 1635 Thomas was born circa 1635. 
Baptism21 Mar 1635 He was baptized at Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England, on 21 Mar 1635.2  
Research note He is referenced in a research note for Thomas Culpeper of Barbados.4 
Will13 Jan 1644 He is mentioned in the will of Sir Alexander Culpeper of Greenway Court, Knight at Greenway Court, Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England, on 13 Jan 1644.5,6 
Will30 Jan 1644 He is mentioned in the will of Sir Alexander Culpeper of Greenway Court, Knight on 30 Jan 1644.7,8 
Marriage*3 Aug 1659 He married Margaretta van Hesse at The Hague, Holland, on 3 Aug 1659.2 
Will3 Jul 1660 He is mentioned in the will of John Lord Culpeper 1st Baron of Thoresway at co. Kent, England, on 3 Jul 1660.9 
Death of Father11 Jul 1660 His father John Lord Culpeper 1st Baron of Thoresway died on 11 Jul 1660 at co. Kent, England.9 
Marriage*say 1670 He married Susanna Willis say 1670. Susanna was the mistress, but not a wife, of Thomas, Lord Culpeper.2 
Residence*between May 1680 and Aug 1680 Thomas resided at Virginia between May 1680 and Aug 1680. (First of only two times in the colony.) 
Residencebetween Dec 1682 and May 1683 Thomas resided at Virginia between Dec 1682 and May 1683. (Last of only two times in the colony.) 
Death*27 Jan 1689 He died at Saint James Street, London, England, on 27 Jan 1689. 
Biography* Thomas, bap. 1634, succeeded his father as second Lord Colepeper, and by his marriage with Margaret, daughter and co-heiress of Jean Van Hesse, Seigneur de Perschill and Wena in Holland, had an only daughter and heiress, Catherine.

The 2nd Lord Colepeper was not a very estimable character. After his death, 27th Jan., 1688/9, his widow stated that her late husband had two houses in London, one in St. James' Street, the other in Hammersmith. He died in St. James' Street and she was living at Leeds Castle, not having had the least notice that he was sick until some time after his decease. She immediately went to London and buried him, and wants to administer his estate in order to pay his debts, which she is informed are very great and many. But Susanna Willis, alias Weldon, alias Laycock, who had been living with him at his house in St. James' Street, has the key of his closets and has possessed herself of everything.

In her answer Susanna Willis mentions her two daughters by Lord Thomas Colepeper, Susan, wife of Sir Charles Englefield, Bart. (married at St. James', Westminster, 22nd Feb., 1685/6) and Charlotte, aged 13. By indenture in 1688 Lord Colepeper granted to her daughters land at Solihull, co. Warwick, the tithes of Mayfield, the Manor of Thoresway, 24 acres at Wittersham, land near Kent Bridge, in Wittersham, yielding £7. 10s. 0d. per annum, land in Erith, Lesnes and Plumstead, valued at £72 per annum, land in Buriton, co. Southants, 260 acres of marsh at Lydde and Bromehill, worth £185 per annum, a farm in Loose, Eastfarlegh and Maidstone, yielding £30 per annum. Then she mentions a will of Thomas Lord Colepeper, in which he revoked all his other wills, especially his last one, Aug. 23rd, 1681, and he settled on his natural daughter Susan, Wife of Sir Charles Englefield, an annuity of £100 for life out of Thoresway Manor and £3,000 portion, £3,000 to his natural daughter Charlotte, his house in Hammersmith to Susanna Weldon, alias Willis. The Manor of Arreton, Isle of Wight, to his natural daughter, Charlotte. The residue of his property to Katherine, his daughter, who is executrix.

A Bill in Parliament to annul the above gifts, whether by deed or will, to Susanna Willis, alias Weldon, alias Laycock, and her two illegitimate children, was rejected in the House of Lords 15 Jan 1689/90.

The preceding all from "The Sussex Colepepers", published in the "Sussex Archaeological Collections", Volume XLVII, 1904, pp 67-69 For a much lengthier discourse on the 2nd Lord Culpeper, see Chapter 3(c) of Fairfax Harrison's "Proprietors of the Northern Neck", found on Culpepper Connections! at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/3c-holling.htm
Biography He is referenced in a biographical note for Alexander Culpeper Surveyor General of VA.10 
Will29 Nov 1691 He is mentioned in the will of Alexander Culpeper Surveyor General of VA on 29 Nov 1691.11,12 
Will12 Aug 1710 He is mentioned in the will of John Lord Culpeper 3rd Baron of Thoresway on 12 Aug 1710.13,14 
Research note He is referenced in a research note for John Marlo Culpepper (Apocryphal).3,15,16 

Family 1

Margaretta van Hesse (12 Jan 1635 - circa 10 May 1710)
Marriage*3 Aug 1659 He married Margaretta van Hesse at The Hague, Holland, on 3 Aug 1659.2 
Child

Family 2

Susanna Willis (say 1645 - )
Marriage*say 1670 He married Susanna Willis say 1670. Susanna was the mistress, but not a wife, of Thomas, Lord Culpeper.2 
Children
ChartsThe 12th century Culpepers of England: Descendant Chart (16 generations, Males only)
The Culpepers of Hollingbourne, co. Kent, England (Possibly extinct): Descendant Chart
Last Edited4 Mar 2013

Citations

  1. Col. F.W.T. Attree R.E./F.S.A. & Rev. J.H.L. Booker M.A., "The Sussex Colepepers, Part I", Sussex Archaeological Collections, XLVII,47-81, (1904)http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/sussex/default.htm.
  2. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    Chapter 3c.
  3. Warren L. Culpepper (#1942), Former publisher of Culpepper Connections, e-mail address.
  4. E-mail written 1999-2011 to Culpepper Connections from William A. 'Bill' Russell, Alexandria, VA, e-mail address (Sep 2011).
  5. E-mail written 2007 to Warren Culpepper from Charles Andrew Grigsby, England, e-mail address.
    Transcription of Will of Sir Alexander Culpeper of Greenway Court Hollingbourne Kent 1649
    Ref: 422.
  6. Public Records Office, National Archives, London.
    Image of will at: /archives/uk/wills/images/Alexander_of_Greenway_Court_1649.pdf .
  7. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    P. C. C. Rivers, 157.
    Image:http://gen.culpepper.com/archives/uk/wills/images/Alexander_of_Greenway_Court_1645-1.pdf.
  8. Public Records Office, National Archives, London.
    Image of will at: /archives/uk/wills/images/Alexander_of_Greenway_Court_1645-1.pdf.
  9. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    P. C. C. Nabbs, 235.
    Will dated July 3, 1660.
    Codicil dated July 9, 1660.
    Proved August 6, 1660.
  10. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    Chapter 4b.
  11. Public Records Office, National Archives, London.
    Image of will at: /archives/uk/wills/images/Alexander_of_Hollingbourne_1695.pdf.
  12. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm
    P.C.C. Irby, 3., Will dated November 29, 1691 and proved January 5, 1694/5.
  13. Public Records Office, National Archives, London.
    Will of John 3rd Lord Culpeper, dated 12 Aug 1710, transcribed by Charles Andrew Grigsby. Image at: http://gen.culpepper.com/archives/uk/wills/images/John_Baron_of_Thoresway_1719-1.pdf and
    http://gen.culpepper.com/archives/uk/wills/images/John_Baron_of_Thoresway_1719-2.pdf.
  14. E-mail written 2007 to Warren Culpepper from Charles Andrew Grigsby, England, e-mail address.
  15. Lewis W. Griffin Jr. (#47), Phoenix, AZ, e-mail address.
  16. Fairfax Harrison, The Proprietors of the Northern Neck - Chapters of Culpepper Genealogy, Richmond, VA: The Old Dominion Press (Privately printed), 1926, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Film #929429. Transcription available online at: http://gen.culpepper.com/historical/nneck/default.htm.

Sir John Culpeper of Oxen Hoath, Knight1,2

Male, #8480, (say 1366 - 1414)
Father*William Culpeper of Preston Hall in Aylesford, co. Kent (s 1342 - s 1402)
Biography The Colepepers were of a very ancient Kentish family, which in the reign of Edward III, separated into two branches; one settled at Bay Hall, near Pepenbury, in Kent, from which descended Baron Colepeper, master of the Rolls in the time of Charles I; and the other seated at Preston Hall, near Aylesford, in the same county, to which John Colepeper, the judge, belonged.
     His grandfather was Sir Jeffrey Colepeper, who was Sheriff of Kent in 40 Edward III. And his father's name was William. We do not find any report of his forensic practice before 1 Henry IV. But this arises from the want of the Year Books of the preceding reign. In the fourth year of that reign he was appointed a king's Serjeant, and was one of that degree who advanced £100 each on loan to the king. On June 7, 1406, 7 Henry IV, he was raised to the bench as a judge of the Common Pleas; and continuing in that court during the remainder of the reign, he received a new patent on the accession of Henry V. His death occurred towards the end of the following year, no fines having been levied before him after the month of July, 1414. He was buried in the church of West Peckham, which manor, together with those of Oxenhoath and of Swanton Court, he gave to the Knights Hospitallers of St. John of Jerusalem.
     By his wife Catherine he left a son, William, who was Sheriff of Kent in 5 Henry VI. To his lineal descendant a baronetcy (that of Preston Hall) was granted in 1627, which became extinct in 1723.
     There was also another baronetcy (that of Wakehurst, in Sussex) granted in 1628 to the other branch of the family, which also became extinct in 1740.3 
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Culpepper. 
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Colepeper. 
Birth*say 1366 John was born at East Farleigh, co. Kent, England, say 1366.4 
Marriage*say 1386 He married Catherine Charles say 1386. 
Birth of Sonsay 1387 His son Sir William Culpeper of Preston Hall, Knight was born say 1387. 
Birth of Sonsay 1389 His son Peter Culpeper of Bletchenden was born say 1389. 
Birth of Sonsay 1391 His son John Culpeper of Oxen Hoath was born say 1391. 
Death of Fathersay 1402 His father William Culpeper of Preston Hall in Aylesford, co. Kent died say 1402. 
Death*1414 He died in 1414. 
Burial*1414 His body was interred in 1414 at West Peckham, co. Kent, England
Biography* The visitation of 1619, says, Sir John was "temp. Henry VI" (Henry VI ruled 1422-1461). However, the Colepeper of Aylesford pedigree says of Sir John, "ob. 1414". 

Family

Catherine Charles (say 1370 - after 1424)
Marriage*say 1386 He married Catherine Charles say 1386. 
Children
ChartsCatherine Howard (Fifth Queen of Henry VIII): Culpeper Ancestral Chart
The 12th century Culpepers of England: Descendant Chart (16 generations, Males only)
Last Edited9 Nov 2010

Citations

  1. Col. F.W.T. Attree R.E./F.S.A. & Rev. J.H.L. Booker M.A., "Colepeper of Aylesford Pedigree in The Sussex Colepepers, Part I", Sussex Archaelogical Collection, Vol. XLVII, 1904.
  2. 1574 Visitation, Kent, England.
  3. Edward Foss, The Judges of England: With Sketches of Their Lives, and Miscellaneous, Google Books: Originals from Oxford University, Published 1851 and digitized 2006.
    pages 202-203.
  4. June Ferguson, Royals Gedcom.

Sir William Culpeper of Preston Hall, Knight1,2

Male, #8481, (say 1387 - 20 Jul 1457)
Father*Sir John Culpeper of Oxen Hoath, Knight (s 1366 - 1414)
Mother*Catherine Charles (s 1370 - a 1424)
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Culpepper. 
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Colepeper. 
Birth*say 1387 William was born say 1387. 
Marriage*say 1412 He married Elizabeth Ferrers of Groby at Tonbridge, co. Kent, England, say 1412.3 
Death of Father1414 His father Sir John Culpeper of Oxen Hoath, Knight died in 1414. 
Birth of Son1417 His son Geoffrey Culpeper was born in 1417 at Aylesford, co. Kent, England
Birth of Sonsay 1428 His son Sir Richard Culpeper of Oxen Hoath was born say 1428. 
Birth of Sonsay 1430 His son William Culpeper of Preston Hall in Aylesford, co. Kent was born say 1430 at Preston Hall, Aylesford, co. Kent, England
Death*20 Jul 1457 He died on 20 Jul 1457. 
Burial* His body was interred at West Peckham, co. Kent, England
Biography* Sheriff of Kent in 5 Henry VI (1426) per the Colepeper of Aylesford pedigree, which also acknowledges that Hasted says he was sheriff in 1427. It also indicates that "Thorpe says he died 20 Jul 1417 (Reg. Roff.)" 

Family

Elizabeth Ferrers of Groby (say 1392 - 1460)
Marriage*say 1412 He married Elizabeth Ferrers of Groby at Tonbridge, co. Kent, England, say 1412.3 
Children
ChartsCatherine Howard (Fifth Queen of Henry VIII): Culpeper Ancestral Chart
The 12th century Culpepers of England: Descendant Chart (16 generations, Males only)
Last Edited9 Nov 2010

Citations

  1. Col. F.W.T. Attree R.E./F.S.A. & Rev. J.H.L. Booker M.A., "Colepeper of Aylesford Pedigree in The Sussex Colepepers, Part I", Sussex Archaelogical Collection, Vol. XLVII, 1904.
  2. 1574 Visitation, Kent, England.
  3. Church of Latter Day Saints, compiler, International Genealogical Index (IGI), Intellectual Reserve, Inc..
    http://www.familysearch.org/

Elizabeth Ferrers of Groby1

Female, #8482, (say 1392 - 1460)
Father*William Ferrers 5th Lord of Groby (s 1362 - )
Mother*Philippa Clifford (s 1365 - )
Birth*say 1392 Elizabeth was born at Groby, Lancashire, England, say 1392. 
Marriage*say 1412 She married Sir William Culpeper of Preston Hall, Knight at Tonbridge, co. Kent, England, say 1412.2 
Married Namesay 1412  As of say 1412, her married name was Culpeper. 
Birth of Son1417 Her son Geoffrey Culpeper was born in 1417 at Aylesford, co. Kent, England
Birth of Sonsay 1428 Her son Sir Richard Culpeper of Oxen Hoath was born say 1428. 
Birth of Sonsay 1430 Her son William Culpeper of Preston Hall in Aylesford, co. Kent was born say 1430 at Preston Hall, Aylesford, co. Kent, England
Death of Spouse20 Jul 1457 Her husband Sir William Culpeper of Preston Hall, Knight died on 20 Jul 1457. 
Death*1460 She died at West Peckham, co. Kent, England, in 1460. 
Burial*1460 Her body was interred in 1460 at West Peckham, co. Kent, England
Biography* The Ferrers arms are impaled on the Culpepper ones at the tomb of William Culpepper and Elizabeth Ferrers. 

Family

Sir William Culpeper of Preston Hall, Knight (say 1387 - 20 Jul 1457)
Marriage*say 1412 She married Sir William Culpeper of Preston Hall, Knight at Tonbridge, co. Kent, England, say 1412.2 
Children
ChartsCatherine Howard (Fifth Queen of Henry VIII): Culpeper Ancestral Chart
Last Edited8 Feb 2011

Citations

  1. Walter Godwin Davis, Massachusetts and Maine families: in the ancestry of Walter Goodwin Davis (1885-1966): a reprinting, in alphabetical order by surname, of the sixteen multi-ancestor compendia: plus Thomas Haley of Winter Harbor and his descendants ., Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Pub. Co., 1996.
  2. Church of Latter Day Saints, compiler, International Genealogical Index (IGI), Intellectual Reserve, Inc..
    http://www.familysearch.org/

Sir Richard Culpeper of Oxen Hoath1,2

Male, #8483, (say 1428 - 4 Oct 1484)
Father*Sir William Culpeper of Preston Hall, Knight (s 1387 - 20 Jul 1457)
Mother*Elizabeth Ferrers of Groby (s 1392 - 1460)
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Culpepper. 
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Colepeper. 
Birth*say 1428 Richard was born say 1428. 
Marriage*say 1449 He married Sybil (?) at Oxen Hoath, West Peckham, co. Kent, England, say 1449. 
Death of Father20 Jul 1457 His father Sir William Culpeper of Preston Hall, Knight died on 20 Jul 1457. 
Death of Mother1460 His mother Elizabeth Ferrers of Groby died in 1460 at West Peckham, co. Kent, England
Marriage*say 1479 He married Isabel Worsley at Oxen Hoath, West Peckham, co. Kent, England, say 1479. 
Birth of Son1484 His son Thomas Culpeper was born in 1484. 
Death*4 Oct 1484 He died on 4 Oct 1484. 
Biography* Richard moved to Oxenheath, West Peckham, Kent, where he was lord of that manor. (Dering MS) Sheriff of Kent in 11 Edward IV (1471-2); died Oct 4 in 2 Richard III (1484). Inq. p.m. 2 Richard III, No. 28. (Per Colepepr of Aylesford pedigree.) 

Family 1

Sybil (?) (say 1431 - before 1479)
Marriage*say 1449 He married Sybil (?) at Oxen Hoath, West Peckham, co. Kent, England, say 1449. 
Children

Family 2

Isabel Worsley (say 1460 - 18 Apr 1527)
Marriage*say 1479 He married Isabel Worsley at Oxen Hoath, West Peckham, co. Kent, England, say 1479. 
Children
ChartsCatherine Howard (Fifth Queen of Henry VIII): Culpeper Ancestral Chart
The 12th century Culpepers of England: Descendant Chart (16 generations, Males only)
Last Edited9 Nov 2010

Citations

  1. Col. F.W.T. Attree R.E./F.S.A. & Rev. J.H.L. Booker M.A., "Colepeper of Aylesford Pedigree in The Sussex Colepepers, Part I", Sussex Archaelogical Collection, Vol. XLVII, 1904.
  2. 1574 Visitation, Kent, England.

Sybil (?)

Female, #8484, (say 1431 - before 1479)
Birth*say 1431 Sybil was born say 1431. 
Marriage*say 1449 She married Sir Richard Culpeper of Oxen Hoath at Oxen Hoath, West Peckham, co. Kent, England, say 1449. 
Married Namesay 1449  As of say 1449, her married name was Culpeper. 
Death*before 1479 She died before 1479. 
Biography* "Living in 1458 (Feet of Fines, Surrey, 37 Henry VI)" per Colepeper of Aylesford pedigree. 

Family

Sir Richard Culpeper of Oxen Hoath (say 1428 - 4 Oct 1484)
Children
Last Edited17 Dec 1999

Elizabeth Culpeper1

Female, #8485, (1450 - after 1492)
Father*Sir Richard Culpeper of Oxen Hoath (s 1428 - 4 Oct 1484)
Mother*Sybil (?) (s 1431 - b 1479)
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Culpepper. 
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Colepeper. 
Birth*1450 Elizabeth was born in 1450. 
Married Namesay 1470  As of say 1470, her married name was Barham. 
Marriage*say 1470 She married Henry Barham of Teston, esq. say 1470. 
Death*after 1492 She died after 1492. 
Biography* Third daughter of Sir Richard, of Oxenhoath. 

Family

Henry Barham of Teston, esq. (say 1447 - )
Marriage*say 1470 She married Henry Barham of Teston, esq. say 1470. 
Last Edited9 Nov 2010

Citations

  1. Col. F.W.T. Attree R.E./F.S.A. & Rev. J.H.L. Booker M.A., "Colepeper of Aylesford Pedigree in The Sussex Colepepers, Part I", Sussex Archaelogical Collection, Vol. XLVII, 1904.

Henry Barham of Teston, esq.1

Male, #8486, (say 1447 - )
Birth*say 1447 Henry was born say 1447. 
Marriage*say 1470 He married Elizabeth Culpeper say 1470. 
Biography* Given in Hasted, but not in Visitation 1619
.
From Warren L. Culpepper, July 2000:
See: http://gen.culpepper.com/places/intl-eng/teston.htm
.
The source of my information about Elizabeth Culpeper and Henry Barham was an old pedigree chart in the Sussex Archaeological Collections by Col. F.W.T. Attree. Elizabeth and six of her siblings are all shown at various specified ages as of 1492 (she was 42). While the source of this info is not given, it would appear that they must have been mentioned in a will or subsequent inquest. It is also clear from a substantial amount of other documentation that Elizabeth, daughter of Richard Culpeper/Colepeper, lived during the later half of the 15th century. So I have no doubt about the period during which Elizabeth, daughter of Richard, lived. The estimated
date of marriage was done by me based upon her birth date. It could be off by as much as 20-30 years, but it is unlikely to be off by more than that.
.
However, while this pedigree shows her married to Henry Barham of Teston, I have no other support for that assertion.
 

Family

Elizabeth Culpeper (1450 - after 1492)
Last Edited18 Dec 1999

Citations

  1. Col. F.W.T. Attree R.E./F.S.A. & Rev. J.H.L. Booker M.A., "Colepeper of Aylesford Pedigree in The Sussex Colepepers, Part I", Sussex Archaelogical Collection, Vol. XLVII, 1904.

Margaret Culpeper1

Female, #8487, (1452 - after 1492)
Father*Sir Richard Culpeper of Oxen Hoath (s 1428 - 4 Oct 1484)
Mother*Sybil (?) (s 1431 - b 1479)
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Culpepper. 
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Colepeper. 
Birth*1452 Margaret was born in 1452. 
Married Namesay 1470  As of say 1470, her married name was Constantine. 
Marriage*say 1470 She married William Constantine say 1470. 
Death*after 1492 She died after 1492. 

Family

William Constantine (say 1449 - )
Last Edited9 Nov 2010

Citations

  1. Col. F.W.T. Attree R.E./F.S.A. & Rev. J.H.L. Booker M.A., "Colepeper of Aylesford Pedigree in The Sussex Colepepers, Part I", Sussex Archaelogical Collection, Vol. XLVII, 1904.

Anna Culpeper1

Female, #8489, (1462 - after 1492)
Father*Sir Richard Culpeper of Oxen Hoath (s 1428 - 4 Oct 1484)
Mother*Sybil (?) (s 1431 - b 1479)
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Culpepper. 
Name-AltSpell This surname is sometimes spelled Colepeper. 
Birth*1462 Anna was born in 1462. 
Married Namesay 1482  As of say 1482, her married name was Holden. 
Marriage*say 1482 She married John Holden say 1482. 
Death*after 1492 She died after 1492. 

Family

John Holden (say 1459 - )
Last Edited9 Nov 2010

Citations

  1. Col. F.W.T. Attree R.E./F.S.A. & Rev. J.H.L. Booker M.A., "Colepeper of Aylesford Pedigree in The Sussex Colepepers, Part I", Sussex Archaelogical Collection, Vol. XLVII, 1904.

John Holden1

Male, #8490, (say 1459 - )
Birth*say 1459 John was born say 1459. 
Marriage*say 1482 He married Anna Culpeper say 1482. 

Family

Anna Culpeper (1462 - after 1492)
Last Edited18 Dec 1999

Citations

  1. Col. F.W.T. Attree R.E./F.S.A. & Rev. J.H.L. Booker M.A., "Colepeper of Aylesford Pedigree in The Sussex Colepepers, Part I", Sussex Archaelogical Collection, Vol. XLVII, 1904.