Col. William Candler1

Male, #45841, (21 Apr 1736 - Sep 1789)
Birth*21 Apr 1736 He was born on 21 Apr 1736 at Virginia.1 
Marriage*1761 He married Elizabeth Anthony in 1761.1 
Birth of Son1762 His son Major Henry Candler was born in 1762 at Bedford Co., Virginia.2,3 
American Revolution*between 1775 and 1783 He provided service in the American Revolutionary War between 1775 and 1783
(DAR Listing: William Candler, born 21 Apr 1736 in Ireland, died Jul 1784 in Georgia, married Elizabeth Anthony, Colonel, Georgia.)4,5 
Birth of Son1779 His son Daniel Candler was born in 1779 at Columbia Co., Georgia.1 
Death of Spouse14 Jul 1784 His wife Elizabeth Anthony died on 14 Jul 1784. 
Death*Sep 1789 He died at Columbia Co., Georgia, in Sep 1789 at age 53.1 
Biography* Allan Daniel Candler, in his book "Colonel William Candler of Georgia, His Ancestry and Progeny", stated unequivocally that William Candler was born, raised, and married in North Carolina. He was misinformed. Wherever William was born, he grew to manhood and married in South River Settlement along the James River in Virginia. Daniel Candler (William's father) was probably settled at South River by the late 1740's. William would have been 14 years old when his brother, John, married a South River girl, Elizabeth Gibson, c1750.
     In 1755, at age nineteen, William joined the Quaker meeting at South River (present-day Lynchburg, VA). Several years thereafter, he was elected clerk of the Quaker Meeting. He acquired modest tracts of land at South River including one sharing property lines with his future father-in-law Joseph Anthony and his father Daniel. The grant survives at the Library of Virginia.
     In 1760, William Candler contracted (with Joseph Ray at Fort Lewis -- present-day Salem, VA) to carry supplies to soldiers stationed at Dunkard Bottom on the New River (present-day Radford, VA). In 1761, he married Elizabeth Anthony. In 1763, he and his brother John and cousin Zachariah Moorman, along with Robert Brooks, appraised two estates (in behalf of neighbor Charles Lynch a prominent South River man). These estates, belonging to Valentine "Felty" Yoacom (Yokum) and Frederick See, were located in present-day Greenbrier County, WV. At the time, this was on the extreme western frontier of Virginia. Yoacom was killed in the Indian massacre at Muddy Creek.
     William Candler was the executor of his father's 1765 will filed in early 1766 in Bedford County, VA.. Later in 1766, he asked the Quaker meeting officials to settle his business -- to give him a certificate of good standing for departure. There are records of land and property sales in 1767 and early 1768.
     After this he may have moved his wife and children to Cane Creek, North Carolina. William would have been relocating among friends and cousins. In 1755, he had received a certificate to travel to the Cane Creek meeting. The Candlers were obviously fine woodsmen, and had no doubt traveled and worked in the VA/NC area. A group of men from South River had gone on to Carolina in 1756 to settle. Some stayed and some returned. It is family legend that William was one who had gone and returned (although these old legends are another story in themselves).
     A group of Quaker colonizers from Cane Creek, under the leadership of Joseph Maddock, moved to Georgia in about 1770 to take up a large grant given to them by Georgia governor Wright. They named this colony Wrightsborough. A short time later, William Candler was appointed as Surveyor of the County. I suspect that he went to Georgia ahead of the other Quakers and surveyed the land grant for the future settlement. Records show that he sold a slave in Georgia in 1769 (named Chester), a slave on whom he paid Pittsylvania County, Virginia tax in 1767.
     Whatever the exact circumstances, William does not appear in Quaker records of the Wrightsborough meeting. The events of the Revolution overtook the details of normal life at South River. The Quaker meeting there was practically closed during the War - many Quakers, against their stated principles, fought against the British foe. When the meeting at South River started up again in 1782, William and Elizabeth Candler were, "discontinued having remove removed from amongst Frs." In common language: they were gone and had not taken up the Quaker ways elsewhere so it was the responsibility of South River Meeting to disown them.
     In Georgia, William became a County Surveyor - in Colonial America this was a major political appointment. George Washington, Patrick Henry, Thomas Jefferson, and Andrew Lewis were each a County Surveyor in Virginia. This appointment marked a man of intelligence, education, woodsmanship, and (most likely) military ability. This is a good description of William Candler of Georgia. At first a major in the Royal militia, he resigned his commission and joined the fight for American Independence. His distinction as a Major, then later Colonel of the Georgia "Refugees" of the American Revolution has been chronicled by his descendants.
     Probably the most famous Candler in American history was Asa Griggs Candler the founder of the Coca-Cola Co. This soft drink scion, philanthropist, and mayor of Atlanta was a descendant of Colonel William Candler (c1736-1784) of Georgia who fought bravely for his state in the American Revolution.
     Georgia Governor Allen Daniel Candler (1834-1910) was a cousin of Asa Candler's. He wrote what is arguably the most widely read book on the Candler family in America, Colonel William Candler of Georgia, His Ancestry and Progeny, 1896, the Foote & Davis Co, Atlanta, GA. To my knowledge, this is the first published work on the Candlers of America. Often quoted (and misquoted) by Candler genealogical researchers, it serves as the anchor to which we can fasten subsequent work.
     Governor Candler strove to reconstruct his lineage from scant and poorly preserved Georgia Colonial and State Revolutionary War records, and such as he could find in the Library of Congress (a pursuit he began during his tenure in the U. S. House of Representatives). He uncovered much valuable data, but he was unaware that his Georgia ancestor had emigrated from Virginia, and thus did not explore the wealth of Candler data in that state.
     He was aware that there were North Carolina, Virginia, and Maryland Candlers, and he speculated that they might share a common ancestor, but he did not know. Subsequent editions of his work included the Virginia connection.
     Today (1999), we have proof that there was indeed a common ancestor of these branches. His name was Daniel Candler. He lived in the Virginia Colony of England, along the James River at South River Settlement (present-day Lynchburg, Virginia). There is documentary proof that Daniel Candler was settled at South River by 1753, and good circumstantial proof for a time just before 1750. He died in late 1765 or early 1766.
     As stated above, Allen D. Candler did not know of Col. William Candler's life at the South River Settlement; but it was there that William joined the Quakers, and there that he married Elizabeth Anthony. Thus it is valuable to "revisit" this life as we find it chronicled in early land grants, civil court and Quaker records (the richest source of details by far).4 
Research note22 Sep 2016 Sent: Sunday, September 18, 2016
Subject: Rachel Candler?

Hello,
 I read your webpage about Col William Candler. I am looking for information about Rachel Candler who was supposed to first show up in St Paul's Parrish (very near Wrightsborough), Georgia between 1755 and 1777. She married (1) Thomas Fuqua (from the Bedford County Va Fuqua family) and had a son named Henry Fuqua born in 1784 in Burke Co, (later Jefferson), Ga. Based on his name I suspect that she was the daughter of William's brother Henry Candler (b:1738). As best as I can find out, Henry Candler died in North Carolina in 1765 and I can find no record of him being married. But I wonder if Rachel was the daughter of Henry and if William brought Rachel to Georgia with him?

 Per the Ga State Archives, Thomas Fuqua and brother Prather Fuqua both reported for duty on 20 Aug, 1781 in Agusta, Ga and were at the siege of Augusta. I believe that Thomas was born in about 1759 in Virginia and died 12 March 1804 • Louisville, Jefferson County, Georgia. IIRC Thomas' paper were signed by Col Greenberry Lee. Lee was married to Mary Few and her brother Ignaius married William Candler's oldest child Mary Ann Candler.
 Rachel Candler was my 4th Great grand mother. Her daughter, supposedly from her 2nd marriage was named Clarissa Johnson and she married Wright Ringgold Coleman (birthdate and location unknown) in 1815 and they moved to Dublin, Laurens County, Ga the same year. Wright was the postmaster, JP, the 1820 census taker for Laurens County and a partner in the law firm of Coleman and Fuqua. The Fuqua being none other than his wife's brother or half brother (we aren't sure which), Henry Fuqua. Wright traveled to New York? and died onboard a ship while returning to Savannah in 1822.
 I am desperately trying to find more about Rachel Candler, Henry Candler and Wright Ringgold Coleman. Do you have ANY information that may help?
 Thanks,
 Joe.6
 
Research note*25 Feb 2017 From: Doug Goode
Sent: Saturday, February 25, 2017
To: lewgriffin@cox.net
Subject: Col. William Candler

The Appendix of Allen D Candler’s book on the Candler family, here is the correct information.
“Thus these two families, the Georgia Candlers and the North Carolina Candlers, meet in Daniel of Bedford and ARE ONE AND THE SAME FAMILY.”
In Daniel Candler’s will, one mentions William and Zedekiah.

Anna Candler Smith Fraser.7 

Family

Elizabeth Anthony (10 Mar 1746 - 14 Jul 1784)
Marriage*1761 He married Elizabeth Anthony in 1761.1 
Children
Last Edited25 Feb 2017

Citations

  1. Todd & Gail Cason, compiler, Cason Family Genealogy.
    (Could not find site in Dec 2005).
  2. E-mail written 2004-2011 to Warren Culpepper from Mary Nelson Pazur (3-gt-gd of #50002), Kennesaw, GA, e-mail address.
  3. RootsWeb WorldConnect Project, Ancestry.com: Rootsweb.
    http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/
    Elton Lacey's Family Files; e-mail address.
  4. Ed Marsh, compiler, Lynchburg Candlers: The First Generations, 1999.
    http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Cottage/9778/lburgcans.html#ColWm
  5. DAR Patriot Index, Washington, DC: National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, 2003.
  6. [mailto:e-mail address].
  7. Doug Goode. <e-mail address>

Mary Evaline Flournoy1

Female, #45842, (1804 - 1 Dec 1821)
Father*William Flournoy2 (s 1772 - b 13 Jun 1831)
Mother*Nancy (?) (1775 - 17 Jun 1829)
Name Variation She was also known as Everlina.2 
Birth*1804 Mary was born in 1804.2 
Marriage*23 Aug 1821 She married Mark Anthony Cooper on 23 Aug 1821.1 
Married Name23 Aug 1821  As of 23 Aug 1821, her married name was Cooper. 
Death*1 Dec 1821 She died at Eatonton, Putnam Co., Georgia, on 1 Dec 1821.2 
Burial*after 1 Dec 1821 Her body was interred after 1 Dec 1821 at Old Union Church Cemetery, Eatonton, Putnam Co., Georgia.2 

Family

Mark Anthony Cooper (20 Apr 1800 - 17 Mar 1885)
Last Edited24 Oct 2002

Citations

  1. Kenneth Coleman and Charles Stephen Gurr, Dictionary of Georgia Biography, University of Georgia Press, 1983.
    pp 217-218.
  2. Edward F. Hull, Early Records of Putnam County, Georgia, 1807-1860: Old Cemeteries Wills and Marriages, Ashland, AL, 190?.
    "Mrs. Everlina Cooper, Daughter of William & Nancy Flournoy, Consort of Mark A. Cooper, Died Dec. 1, 1821, Age 17 years", page 17.

James Anthony

Male, #45843, (18 Dec 1752 - 1827)
Father*Joseph Anthony Sr. (2 May 1713 - 23 Nov 1785)
Mother*Elizabeth Clarke (15 Feb 1720 - 1813)
Birth*18 Dec 1752 He was born on 18 Dec 1752 at Louisa Co., Virginia.1 
Relocationcirca 1758 He was an accompanying familiy member in the relocation of Joseph Anthony Sr. circa 1758 at Bedford Co., Virginia.2 
Marriage*29 Sep 1772 He married Nancy Ann Tate at Bedford Co., Virginia, on 29 Sep 1772 at age 19. 
American Revolution*between 1775 and 1783 He provided service in the American Revolutionary War between 1775 and 1783
(DAR Listing: James Anthony, born 18 Dec 1752 in Virginia, died 1827 in Georgia, married Anne (Nancy) Tate, Patriotic Service, Virginia
-------------------------------------------------------
He is listed among those who renounced allegiance to Great Britain and swore allegiance to the Commonwealth of Virginia. He was a Sergeant in 2nd Battalion, 1st Regiment, 5th Company, Infantry of WIlkes Co., GA under Major Aaron Lipham.)3,4 
Residence*before 1778 James resided at Wilkes Co., Georgia, before 1778. (Among the first persons found in Wilkes County prior to 1778 were James Anthony, Daniel Grant, Thomas Grant. James was a leader in enterprise, interested in cotton and woolen mills.)5,3 
Will24 Sep 1785 In Joseph Anthony Sr.'s will on 24 Sep 1785 at Henry Co., Virginia, Elizabeth, Sarah, Christopher, Elizabeth, Penelope, Joseph, James, Mary, Agnes, Micajah, Rachel, Winifred, Mark, Bolling and Judith named as heir(s).6 
Death of Father23 Nov 1785 His father Joseph Anthony Sr. died on 23 Nov 1785 at Henry Co., Virginia
Birth of Son7 Aug 1789 His son Milton Anthony was born on 7 Aug 1789 at Henry Co., Virginia.7 
Deed14 Jul 1793 He was an adjacent landowner in the deed granted by Joseph Anthony Jr. and Elizabeth Anthony to Mark Anthony and Bolling Anthony on 14 Jul 1793 at Wilkes Co., Georgia, (Joseph Anthony and Wife Betsy, of Wilkes Co. sell 536 acres on Fishing Creek, on James Anthony's line, to Mark and Bolling Anthony, with all appurtances, thereto appertaining, July 14, 1793. Test: Bedford Brown, JP. Deeds Bk PP, page 151.)8 
Death of Mother1813 His mother Elizabeth Clarke died in 1813 at Wilkes Co., Georgia
Death*1827 He died at Georgia in 1827.9 
Biography* James Anthony, along with Colonel George Hairston, in 1790, donated the fifty acres of land as a site for the courthouse and public buildings, where the central part of the town of Martinsville is now situated. He was also the father of Dr. Milton Anthony, the distinguished physician who founded the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta.1 

Family

Nancy Ann Tate (1754 - 1834)
Marriage*29 Sep 1772 He married Nancy Ann Tate at Bedford Co., Virginia, on 29 Sep 1772 at age 19. 
Child
Last Edited30 Apr 2012

Citations

  1. Genealogies of Virginia Families, .
    Volume I, A-Ch, Anthony-Cooper, page 13.
  2. William C. Stewart, Gone to Georgia: Jackson and Gwinnett Counties and their Neighbors in the Western Migration, Washington, DC: Nat'l Genealogical Society, 1965.
    page 255.
  3. Patricia Davidson-Peters, compiler, Patricia Davidson-Peters, Anthony: Quakers of Colonial Virginia, 2000-2005.
    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~sunnyann/anthony.html
  4. DAR Patriot Index, Washington, DC: National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, 2003.
  5. Eliza A. Bowen, The Story of Wilkes County, Georgia, Continental Book Co., 1950.
    Chapter IX: "The Settlers", pp 51, 55.
  6. William C. Stewart, Gone to Georgia: Jackson and Gwinnett Counties and their Neighbors in the Western Migration, Washington, DC: Nat'l Genealogical Society, 1965.
    pages 253-254.
  7. Kenneth Coleman and Charles Stephen Gurr, Dictionary of Georgia Biography, University of Georgia Press, 1983.
    Vol. I, pages 32-34.
  8. Smith, Wilkes Co. Early GA Wills and Marriages, 1960.
    page 13.
  9. William C. Stewart, Gone to Georgia: Jackson and Gwinnett Counties and their Neighbors in the Western Migration, Washington, DC: Nat'l Genealogical Society, 1965.
    page 254.

Nancy Ann Tate

Female, #45844, (1754 - 1834)
Birth*1754 She was born in 1754 at Louisa Co., Virginia. She was the daughter of Henry Tate.1 
Marriage*29 Sep 1772 She married James Anthony at Bedford Co., Virginia, on 29 Sep 1772. 
Married Name29 Sep 1772  As of 29 Sep 1772, her married name was Anthony. 
Birth of Son7 Aug 1789 Her son Milton Anthony was born on 7 Aug 1789 at Henry Co., Virginia.2 
Death of Spouse1827 Her husband James Anthony died in 1827 at Georgia.3 
Death*1834 She died at Jasper Co., Georgia, in 1834. 

Family

James Anthony (18 Dec 1752 - 1827)
Child
Last Edited21 Oct 2002

Citations

  1. Patricia Davidson-Peters, compiler, Patricia Davidson-Peters, Anthony: Quakers of Colonial Virginia, 2000-2005.
    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~sunnyann/anthony.html
  2. Kenneth Coleman and Charles Stephen Gurr, Dictionary of Georgia Biography, University of Georgia Press, 1983.
    Vol. I, pages 32-34.
  3. William C. Stewart, Gone to Georgia: Jackson and Gwinnett Counties and their Neighbors in the Western Migration, Washington, DC: Nat'l Genealogical Society, 1965.
    page 254.

Milton Anthony1

Male, #45845, (7 Aug 1789 - 19 Sep 1839)
Father*James Anthony1 (18 Dec 1752 - 1827)
Mother*Nancy Ann Tate1 (1754 - 1834)
Birth*7 Aug 1789 He was born on 7 Aug 1789 at Henry Co., Virginia.1 
Death of Father1827 His father James Anthony died in 1827 at Georgia.2 
Death of Mother1834 His mother Nancy Ann Tate died in 1834 at Jasper Co., Georgia
Death*19 Sep 1839 He died at Augusta, Richmond Co., Georgia, on 19 Sep 1839 at age 50.1 
Biography* ANTONY, MILTON. Physician, educator. Born Henry County, Va., 7 August 1789; died Augusta, Ga., 19 September 1839. Son of James and Ann Tate Antony. Married Nancy Godwin, 1809. Children: Sarah Ann, Laura M., Edwin L., Lavonsia A., Julia A., Milton (died young), Susan A., Milton Jr., Richard, James A., and John W Education: University of Pennsylvania School of Med­icine [1808-9?].
When Milton Antony was quite young the family moved to Washington, Wilkes County, Ga., and there he grew to young manhood.
His formal schooling was limited. At the age of sixteen he was apprenticed to Dr. Joel Abbott of Monticello in Jasper County, Ga. When nineteen he attended a year's course of medical lectures at the University of Penn­sylvania, but apparently as a result of finan­cial stringency he was unable to complete the second year and receive the M.D. de­gree.
He returned to Georgia and married, and after living for a brief time in New Or­leans, he had settled in Augusta by the spring of 1819. There in Richmond County he spent the rest of his active and productive life.
Able and ambitious for himself, his family, and for Georgia, Antony's greatest strength lay in his organizational ability and the ease with which he cut through political bureau­cracy. In 1822 he was one of the chief or­ganizers of the Richmond County Medical Society; three years later he waged a suc­cessful campaign to have the legislature cre­ate a state board of medical examiners. Antony was the board's first president.
By 1826 he was giving rudimentary medical in­struction to a number of aspiring physicians at the City Hospital of Augusta. There he was joined by Joseph A. Eve, a graduate of the Medical College of South Carolina in 1828. This same school awarded Antony the M.D. degree ad eundem in 1825.
In con­junction with a number of other physicians in Augusta, Antony applied to the Georgia legislature for a charter to create the Medical Academy of Georgia. The request was granted in 1828, and classes at the academy com­menced in 1829. The school was given the right to operate a one-year course, at the conclusion of which a bachelor of medicine degree was to be awarded. The academy ordered an expanded term of over six months for its students when a four-month term was in vogue at virtually all other medical schools in the country.
Hardly had the school offi­cially opened than Antony and the board of the college applied to the state for an exten­sion of powers, the right to offer a two-year course, and authority to confer the M.D. degree. In 1829 the legislature authorized the creation of the Medical Institute of the State of Georgia with the power to grant the doctorate. A second year of lectures was approved, and the faculty was to be doubled in size to six professors.
However, owing to financial considerations, the school could not expand fully into its new curriculum for sev­eral years. The state and the city of Augusta were asked to support this promising exper­iment in medical education. Grants and sub­sidies were requested to strengthen the academic program and to construct a suitable building. Antony and his colleagues were successful on all fronts. In addition, the name of the institute was changed to the Medical College of Georgia.
The academic year 1832-­33 marks, in the words of Paul Fitzsimmons Eve, the school's first course offered "as a college." The money appropriated, the pow­ers granted to the Medical College, and the enthusiastic cooperation of the Academy of Richmond County as well as of the city fath­ers, not only meant academic success but resulted in the construction by Charles Clus­key of MCG's first home. This building, with its massive Doric columns, was com­pleted by 1836 and is looked upon by many as being one of the best examples of Greek Revival architecture in the South.
In all of these developments Antony was the unques­tioned leader, and there seems no reason to doubt that he was also instrumental in send­ing Louis A. Dugas to Europe in 1834 to secure an adequate library and museum for the faculty and student body of MCG.
In May 1835 MCG, certainly with Antony's approval if not actually at his instigation, sent a circular letter to the other medical schools in the country calling for reform of American medical education and presaging the creation of a nationwide medical asso­ciation. The letter fell on deaf ears. Antony and his school were ahead of the times.
Not content with his academic and organiza­tional feats, Antony proved to be the most important person in the move to create an effective and long-lasting medical journal in Augusta. The first issue of the Southern Medical and Surgical Journal appeared in 1836, and the magazine was a success from the start. In its pages were reprinted some of the most useful articles that had appeared on medical subjects all over the world.
It also acted as a stage from which the professors at MCG-and elsewhere in the South--could demonstrate their original research. Craw­ford W Long, for instance, first published his claim to pre-eminence in ether anesthesia in SMSJ's pages. Antony was editor or coed­itor of the Augusta journal until his death. Then after several years of silence SMSJ was revived and remained, throughout the ante­bellum period, the South's most consistent and respected medical publication. Antony's publications, upon such diverse topics as "On Physical Examinations," "The Causes of Abortions," "Medical Electricity," "Maternal Impressions," and others, are to be found primarily in SMSJ.
At MCG, Antony held the position of professor of the institutes and practice of medicine and of midwifery and diseases of women and children. Although he was primarily a general practitioner, he was adept at surgery. In 1821, for instance, he performed an operation where he excised two ribs and removed a section of a gan­grenous lung. This daring operation was re­ported in the Philadelphia Journal of Medical and Physical Sciences in 1823, and was re­printed by Dr. George Foy in Ireland in 1893.
Antony was struck down in 1839 during the yellow-fever epidemic that plagued Au­gusta. He had been tending the sick and dying since the disease had appeared in town.
Antony is Georgia's most important medical pioneer. He found a promising situation in Augusta and took advantage of it to create the state's first medical college and one of the South's best medical journals. His ac­complishments on the state level are signifi­cant as well. Suspicious of herb doctors and quacks, he felt that proper formal education and the licensing of practitioners would stamp out the medical superstitions that were so prominent during his day. Antony moved easily and with considerable confidence in the chambers of the state capitol-just as he did in Augusta's city hall. He inspired con­fidence in those with whom he dealt and had high standards of medical education. Antony triumphed over the obstacles that stood in his path and affected the state dramatically as a result of his achievements.1
 
Last Edited20 Aug 2002

Citations

  1. Kenneth Coleman and Charles Stephen Gurr, Dictionary of Georgia Biography, University of Georgia Press, 1983.
    Vol. I, pages 32-34.
  2. William C. Stewart, Gone to Georgia: Jackson and Gwinnett Counties and their Neighbors in the Western Migration, Washington, DC: Nat'l Genealogical Society, 1965.
    page 254.

Daniel Candler1

Male, #45846, (1779 - 1816)
Father*Col. William Candler1 (21 Apr 1736 - Sep 1789)
Mother*Elizabeth Anthony1 (10 Mar 1746 - 14 Jul 1784)
Birth*1779 He was born in 1779 at Columbia Co., Georgia.1 
Death of Mother14 Jul 1784 His mother Elizabeth Anthony died on 14 Jul 1784. 
Death of FatherSep 1789 His father Col. William Candler died in Sep 1789 at Columbia Co., Georgia.1 
Marriage*1799 He married Sarah B. Slaughter at Georgia in 1799.1 
Birth of Son6 Dec 1809 His son Samuel Charles Candler was born on 6 Dec 1809.1 
Birth of Son22 Feb 1812 His son Daniel Gill Candler was born on 22 Feb 1812 at Columbia Co., Georgia.1 
Death*1816 He died at Columbia Co., Georgia, in 1816.1 

Family

Sarah B. Slaughter (circa 1784 - 1 Jun 1865)
Marriage*1799 He married Sarah B. Slaughter at Georgia in 1799.1 
Children
Last Edited13 Jun 2004

Citations

  1. Todd & Gail Cason, compiler, Cason Family Genealogy.
    (Could not find site in Dec 2005).

Sarah B. Slaughter1

Female, #45847, (circa 1784 - 1 Jun 1865)
Birth*circa 1784 She was born circa 1784 at Georgia.1 
Marriage*1799 She married Daniel Candler at Georgia in 1799.1 
Married Name1799  As of 1799, her married name was Candler. 
Birth of Son6 Dec 1809 Her son Samuel Charles Candler was born on 6 Dec 1809.1 
Birth of Son22 Feb 1812 Her son Daniel Gill Candler was born on 22 Feb 1812 at Columbia Co., Georgia.1 
Death of Spouse1816 Her husband Daniel Candler died in 1816 at Columbia Co., Georgia.1 
Death*1 Jun 1865 She died at Villa Rica, Carroll Co., Georgia, on 1 Jun 1865.1 

Family

Daniel Candler (1779 - 1816)
Marriage*1799 She married Daniel Candler at Georgia in 1799.1 
Children
Last Edited20 Aug 2002

Citations

  1. Todd & Gail Cason, compiler, Cason Family Genealogy.
    (Could not find site in Dec 2005).

Samuel Charles Candler1

Male, #45848, (6 Dec 1809 - 15 Nov 1873)
Father*Daniel Candler1 (1779 - 1816)
Mother*Sarah B. Slaughter1 (c 1784 - 1 Jun 1865)
Birth*6 Dec 1809 He was born on 6 Dec 1809.1 
Death of Father1816 His father Daniel Candler died in 1816 at Columbia Co., Georgia.1 
Marriage*1833 He married Martha Bernetta Beall at Cherokee Co., Georgia, in 1833.1 
Birth of Son30 Dec 1851 His son Asa Griggs Candler was born on 30 Dec 1851 at Villa Rica, Carroll Co., Georgia.1 
Death of Mother1 Jun 1865 His mother Sarah B. Slaughter died on 1 Jun 1865 at Villa Rica, Carroll Co., Georgia.1 
Death*15 Nov 1873 He died at Carroll Co., Georgia, on 15 Nov 1873 at age 63.1 
Biography* In the later 1830s, Samuel Candler and his fourteen-year-old bride, Martha, came to the rolling hills of Carroll County, Georgia, bringing with them two wedding gifts from her father: an Indian pony named Picayune and a slave girl named Mary. Several streams watered the 300 acres of land where they began to farm. There, Samuel and Martha built their home on the crest of a ridge surrounded by oak and hickory trees. Facing south, it began as a "dog trot" house--two small structures with doors that opened on a covered hall or breezeway between them. Large porches sheltered the front and rear of the building. Following the custom of the time, one large room, warmed by a fireplace in winter, doubled as a dining room and sitting room. The kitchen was a separate building. Over the years, Samuel and Martha had eight sons and three daughters and as the family expanded, so did the house. Eventually, their "comfortable but not ostentatious" home contained many books and a piano, enough evidence for their grandson's opinion that "both were unusually cultured for their period and place."

The farm was, of course, a commercial enterprise, but Samuel's business interests extended far beyond its boundaries. He also occasionally held public office. Early in Samuel Candler's childhood his father had died, so he grew up partly in the care of a kinsman, Dr. Ignatius W. Few, who became the founder and first president of Emory College in Oxford, Georgia. Candler's large extended family was moderately comfortable, but as an orphan, he had to make his own way in the world.

As Samuel Candler entered adulthood, a new opportunity for wealth appeared. In the spring of 1830, tales of gold nuggets snagged in the roots of fallen trees and gold dust in the gravel of mountain streams brought thousands of prospectors into the lands of the Cherokees in the northwest quarter of the present state of Georgia. No one knows the exact place or time of the original discovery, but by the end of the year it was clear that the prospectors had come to stay. The Cherokees resisted for nearly a decade before they were forced to march west on the Trail of Tears to the Oklahoma Indian Territory. The state of Georgia divided the former Cherokee lands to form all or parts of twenty-four new counties.

The history of northwest Georgia now became a story of miners and farmers and men who built new cities. The miners came first, probing to discover the diagonal band of gold deposits that ran from Carroll County, west of Atlanta, to Rabun County in the state's extreme northeast corner. The most intense activity clustered in the Dahlonega area and in the area between Acworth and Canton; about thirty miles west of Atlanta, another cluster of activity developed in Carroll County. All sorts of people tried their luck in the hunt for gold. After bringing in their harvests, small farmers left their fields to prospect; prosperous planters leased gold lots, sending their slaves to work at panning or placer mining. Some full-time miners prospected the countryside on their own; others sought employment with mining companies.

As a young man during the Georgia gold rush of the early 1830s, Samuel Candler pursued various mining activities, first in Carroll County and then in Cherokee County. It was in 1833, during this stay in Cherokee County, that he married Martha Bernetta Beall. Samuel made a good impression on his neighbors who elected him sheriff in 1834 and then sent him as a representative to the legislature in 1835. However, the newlyweds soon moved to the farm in Carroll County.

Acting as the agent for a group of Macon investors who leased out gold prospecting rights on land they owned in the area, Candler received ten percent of the rents he collected for them. He also began to diversify his business interests. With several partners, he developed the site that became the present town of Villa Rica. Candler then borrowed $1500 to open a store in the town and was successful enough to repay the sum promptly.' This general store-Villa Rica's first-usually contained $2,000 in stock. Miners came to the store with gold dust that they packed in goose quills for safe-keeping; thus the storekeeper became a small dealer in gold. Through these and other investments, Samuel Candler became one of the most prosperous men of his region.

As Carroll County matured, although its gold deposits dwindled, the area retained its simple, frontier qualities. The inhabitants continued some mining, and they also raised stock or engaged in subsistence farming. Only those like Candler, who could afford the best acreage, undertook commercial agriculture and speculated in land: in 1847 Samuel Candler owned 7,800 acres in Carroll and Paulding counties.

In the nineteenth century, the R. G. Dun Company--predecessor to today's Dun and Bradstreet--collected credit information on American firms from respected local businessmen. In their confidential reports on Samuel Candler, his fellow merchants consistently rate him as a safe, reliable man with good business capacity. In 1848 the entry calls him "a careful money saving money loving man," worth between $5,000 and $10,000. According to this report, he invested equally in real estate, stock in trade (for his store), and Negroes.

When the market value of slaves rose more rapidly than the value of land, slave ownership indicated the location of the true wealth of Carroll County. In 1850 this was the case, when 3.5 percent of the county's ten thousand free inhabitants owned the county's 1500 slaves. The largest Carroll County owner was Elijah Dobbs, who owned forty-five slaves in 1860. Candler--with just under twenty slaves--ranked among the county's larger slave holders, in terms of the number of individuals owned. Some of the area's more prosperous men may have bought slaves for speculative purposes. Many of Candler's slaves must have been engaged in working on his farm, but whether all were doing so is unknown. In June 1860 Candler owned four "slave houses" occupied by seventeen persons of various ages and both sexes. At the same time, acting as an agent for S. B. Chapman (possibly as executor of an estate), Candler reported an additional nineteen persons and three houses.

By the time of the birth in 1851 of his eighth child, Asa, the elder Candler had retired from the store, leaving it in the charge of William, one of his older sons. However, he continued his involvement in public affairs and Democratic party politics. During his long residence in Carroll county he served a term in each house of the legislature and was elected judge of the Inferior Court (justice of the peace). Other members of the Candler family served in similar ways; at one point Samuel sat in the legislature at the same time as his brother Ezekiel and Ezekiel's son Milton.

While Samuel secured the family's fortunes, Martha took a strong role in their home. She led her eleven children in daily family worship, aided by the "English book of prayer." For many years she took the children to the Primitive Baptist Church, although the Candler family later became Methodist. Samuel himself did not join a church until later in life, but strong habits of hard work and sober living certainly contributed to the family's growing prosperity. In keeping with such principles, the Candlers, although comfortable, did not indulge themselves.

/////////////

Following the practice of most rural families of their day, Samuel and Martha required the children to help with the work of the farm. A friend of the family later claimed that the Candler boys "found play in work" under their father's firm discipline: "Even on Saturdays, when other boys would be idle, the Candler boys were busy doing something." A small, wiry child, Asa lost the hearing in one ear when he fell from a loaded wagon while helping to harvest a field of corn. One of the wheels struck his head. However, if the discipline was firm, it was not so rigid as to stifle the children's sense of fun. One night, Asa hid under the bed of his youngest brother Charlie, a boy who suffered from a great fear of cats. Asa let out a life-like feline yowl and his terrified brother ran to their mother. Samuel was forced to rise from his bed to restore order to the agitated household.

In a photographic portrait from this time the boy Asa looks at the camera with the same direct, skeptical gaze that was to be seen on the front pages of Atlanta's newspapers more than half a century later. Perhaps he remembered his own youth years later, when Asa Candler described a typical boy: "A boy... loves to do things that he imagines makes him appear to be a man. See him raking his upper lip vainly endeavoring to coax to the surface a mustache before its time, nauseating his stomach trying to chew tobacco and spit amber...all to make himself believe that he is a man."

Samuel and Martha gave particular, tender care to their third child, Noble Daniel Candler, who was mentally impaired. According to one family history, Noble had been a normal child until he suffered "a disease of the brain" when he was four years old. His brother John described Noble as "a man in stature, but less than a child in mind." He lived all his life with his mother, who cared for him until his death in 1887. Asa Candler's heartfelt expressions of love and concern for his own children and the life-long bonds that connected him with his brothers and sisters bear silent witness to the fundamentally sound character of Martha and Samuel's child-rearing methods, stern though they might have been.

Even in his youth, Asa demonstrated an acute business sense. One enterprise began when a marauding mink disturbed the peace of the hens that lived under his mother's kitchen. Asa went to the rescue, diving under the house to rout the predator. He scrambled after the mink, out of the yard, through the woods and into a creek, where he caught up with it. The mink bit him, leaving a permanent scar on his arm, but young Candler triumphed, forever ending the mink's menace to the family chickens. He decided to send the pelt to Atlanta by wagon, hoping to sell it for twenty-five cents. To his delighted surprise, it brought a dollar. Young Candler's entrepreneurial character... (See book for balance of biography.)2
 

Family

Martha Bernetta Beall (1813 - )
Marriage*1833 He married Martha Bernetta Beall at Cherokee Co., Georgia, in 1833.1 
Child
Last Edited7 Sep 2002

Citations

  1. Todd & Gail Cason, compiler, Cason Family Genealogy.
    (Could not find site in Dec 2005).
  2. Kathryn W. Kemp, God's Capitalist: Asa Candler of Coca Cola, Mercer University Press, Macon, GA, 2002, Repository: Warren Culpepper's Personal Library.
    pages 7-11.

Martha Bernetta Beall1,2

Female, #45849, (1813 - )
Birth*1813 She was born in 1813.1 
Marriage*1833 She married Samuel Charles Candler at Cherokee Co., Georgia, in 1833.1 
Married Name1833  As of 1833, her married name was Candler. 
Birth of Son30 Dec 1851 Her son Asa Griggs Candler was born on 30 Dec 1851 at Villa Rica, Carroll Co., Georgia.1 

Family

Samuel Charles Candler (6 Dec 1809 - 15 Nov 1873)
Child
Last Edited7 Sep 2002

Citations

  1. Todd & Gail Cason, compiler, Cason Family Genealogy.
    (Could not find site in Dec 2005).
  2. Kathryn W. Kemp, God's Capitalist: Asa Candler of Coca Cola, Mercer University Press, Macon, GA, 2002, Repository: Warren Culpepper's Personal Library.
    pages 8.

Asa Griggs Candler1

Male, #45850, (30 Dec 1851 - 12 Mar 1929)
Father*Samuel Charles Candler1 (6 Dec 1809 - 15 Nov 1873)
Mother*Martha Bernetta Beall1 (1813 - )
Birth*30 Dec 1851 He was born on 30 Dec 1851 at Villa Rica, Carroll Co., Georgia.1 
Death of Father15 Nov 1873 His father Samuel Charles Candler died on 15 Nov 1873 at Carroll Co., Georgia.1 
Death*12 Mar 1929 He died at Atlanta, Fulton Co., Georgia, on 12 Mar 1929 at age 77.1 
Biography* Asa Griggs Candler: Founder of the Coca Cola Company

Asa Griggs Candler was born in Villa Rica, Georgia on December 30, 1851. He was one of eleven children in the Candler family. The Civil War was being fought during some of Candler's youthful days, and is one of the reasons that he had sporadic schooling. After the war ended, he did spend some time in high school, but he was anxious to get started in the outside world. He left school in 1870 and set out to find a pharmacist that he could apprentice for. Over the next several years, Candler learned what he could about the drugstore business. Then he moved on to Atlanta. Here he entered into a series of partnerships and business deals and had his own company in 1886. By 1888, he had built up one of the largest drug businesses in Atlanta.

Candler was a very savvy businessman. When he saw opportunities, he acted. There was another Atlanta druggist, Dr. John Pembleton, who had started selling a fizzy concoction of soda water and a patent medicine at Jacob's Pharmacy in Atlanta. The drink, which Dr. Pembleton called Coca Cola, was enjoyed by several of the pharmacy's regular customers. The story is that Asa Candler purchased the recipe for Coca Cola for $2300. From that start he turned Coca Cola into a nationally recognized brand. He marketed his product like no other product had been marketed before. He spent enormous sums (by the standards of the time) on advertising. But he succeeded. Today, of course, the Coca-Cola brand is known the world over, and Coke itself is about as close to a U.S. national symbol as are hot dogs and baseball.

Asa Griggs Candler amassed a very sizeable fortune over his lifetime, and in his later years, until his death in 1929, he devoted much of his time and energy to philanthropy.2 
Last Edited15 Jun 2008

Citations

  1. Todd & Gail Cason, compiler, Cason Family Genealogy.
    (Could not find site in Dec 2005).
  2. http://www.netstate.com/states/peop/people/ga_agc.htm

Daniel Gill Candler1

Male, #45851, (22 Feb 1812 - )
Father*Daniel Candler1 (1779 - 1816)
Mother*Sarah B. Slaughter1 (c 1784 - 1 Jun 1865)
Birth*22 Feb 1812 He was born on 22 Feb 1812 at Columbia Co., Georgia.1 
Marriage*8 Oct 1833 He married Nancy Matthews on 8 Oct 1833 at age 21.1 
Death* He died at Gainesville, Hall Co., Georgia.1 
Birth of Son4 Nov 1834 His son Allen Daniel Candler was born on 4 Nov 1834 at Homer, Franklin Co., Georgia.2 

Family

Nancy Matthews (say 1815 - )
Child
Last Edited20 Aug 2002

Citations

  1. Todd & Gail Cason, compiler, Cason Family Genealogy.
    (Could not find site in Dec 2005).
  2. Biographical Directory of the US Congress, Office of the Historian, retrieved 2005.
    http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp

Nancy Matthews1

Female, #45852, (say 1815 - )
Birth*say 1815 She was born say 1815.1 
Marriage*8 Oct 1833 She married Daniel Gill Candler on 8 Oct 1833.1 
Married Name8 Oct 1833  As of 8 Oct 1833, her married name was Candler. 
Birth of Son4 Nov 1834 Her son Allen Daniel Candler was born on 4 Nov 1834 at Homer, Franklin Co., Georgia.2 

Family

Daniel Gill Candler (22 Feb 1812 - )
Child
Last Edited20 Aug 2002

Citations

  1. Todd & Gail Cason, compiler, Cason Family Genealogy.
    (Could not find site in Dec 2005).
  2. Biographical Directory of the US Congress, Office of the Historian, retrieved 2005.
    http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp

Allen Daniel Candler1

Male, #45853, (4 Nov 1834 - 26 Oct 1910)
Father*Daniel Gill Candler1 (22 Feb 1812 - )
Mother*Nancy Matthews1 (s 1815 - )
Birth*4 Nov 1834 He was born on 4 Nov 1834 at Homer, Franklin Co., Georgia.1 
Death*26 Oct 1910 He died at Atlanta, Fulton Co., Georgia, on 26 Oct 1910 at age 75.1 
Biography* CANDLER, Allen Daniel, (cousin of Ezekiel Samuel Candler, Jr., and Milton Anthony Candler), a Representative from Georgia; born in Homer, Banks County, Ga., November 4, 1834; attended country schools, and was graduated from Mercer University, Macon, Ga., in 1859; studied law; entered the Confederate Army as a private in Company H, Thirty-fourth Regiment of Georgia Infantry on May 12, 1862; was elected first lieutenant May 17, 1862; promoted to captain October 26, 1862; appointed lieutenant colonel May 16, 1864; promoted to colonel December 27, 1864; engaged in agricultural pursuits; member of the State house of representatives 1873-1877; served in the State senate in 1878 and 1879; engaged in manufacturing and was president of a railroad; elected as a Democrat to the Forty-eighth and to the three succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1883-March 3, 1891); chairman, Committee on Education (Fiftieth Congress); was not a candidate for reelection in 1890; secretary of state of Georgia from May 28, 1894, until March 1, 1898, when he resigned; served as Governor of Georgia from 1898 to 1902; compiler of the records of the State of Georgia from 1903 until his death in Atlanta, Ga., October 26, 1910; interment in Alta Vista Cemetery, Gainesville, Ga.1
 
Last Edited20 Aug 2002

Citations

  1. Biographical Directory of the US Congress, Office of the Historian, retrieved 2005.
    http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp

Richard Norwood1

Male, #45854, (say 1670 - )
Birth*say 1670 He was born say 1670.1 
Marriage*say 1698 He married Elizabeth (?) say 1698.1 

Family

Elizabeth (?) (say 1673 - )
Child
ChartsWLC / Warren L. Culpepper Ancestral Chart
Last Edited1 Jan 2012

Citations

  1. B. C. Holtzclaw, "Clark of Surry and Isle of Wight Counties," Southern Genealogies #1, Historical Southern Families, Vol. IFTM CD191.

Elizabeth (?)1

Female, #45855, (say 1673 - )
Birth*say 1673 She was born say 1673.1 
Marriage*say 1698 She married Richard Norwood say 1698.1 
Married Namesay 1698  As of say 1698, her married name was Norwood.1 

Family

Richard Norwood (say 1670 - )
Child
ChartsWLC / Warren L. Culpepper Ancestral Chart
Last Edited1 Jan 2012

Citations

  1. B. C. Holtzclaw, "Clark of Surry and Isle of Wight Counties," Southern Genealogies #1, Historical Southern Families, Vol. IFTM CD191.

Thomas Clarke (3)1

Male, #45856, (circa 1677 - 1728)
Father*Thomas Clarke (2)1 (s 1652 - 1700)
Mother*Elizabeth Sampson1 (s 1655 - )
Birth*circa 1677 He was born circa 1677 at Virginia.1 
Marriage*say 1699 He married Susannah (?) say 1699.1 
Death of Father1700 His father Thomas Clarke (2) died in 1700.1 
Birth of Soncirca 1703 His son Thomas Clarke (4) was born circa 1703 at Isle of Wight Co., Virginia.1 
Death*1728 He died at Bertie Co., North Carolina, in 1728.1 
Biography* Thomas(3) Clark, son of Thomas(2) and Elizabeth (Sampson) Clarke, was brobably born about 1677-78. He first appears in the family of his brother Sampson Clarke in Surry County in 1699, but moved back to Isle of Wight County for a few years thereafter. He was married by August 29, 1700, when he and his wife Susannah witnessed a deed from Rebecca Gutridge of Isle of Wight County, to John Prison of Surry (Surry D.&W. 1694-1709, p. 215). Thomas Clarke was an appraiser of the estate of John Wilkton in Isle of Wight County August 9, 1701 (Chapman, I, 60), and is shown as a Cornet in that county in 1702, in a list of magistrates and militia who prepared an address of loyalty to Queen Anne of England (Boddie, 17th Cent., p. 169). There is no present clue to the maiden name of Susannah, wife of Thomas(3) Clarke, except the bare possibility that she was a daughter of George Williams of Isle of Wight County, who in his will, dated Aug. 26, 1737, and probated Feb. 25, 1744, leaves his property to his wife Elizabeth; sons George, Thomas, and Roland; and a plantation to his grandson Thomas Clark (who may have been Thomas(4) Clark, son of Thomas(3)). Thomas Clark deeded this land in Isle of Wight County to Nicholas Williams Oct. 13, 1748. I am not at all sure, however, that this Thomas Clark was identical with the son of Thomas(3). All the evidence points to this George Williams as being a son of a Roland Williams, who died in Isle of Wight County in 1679, and left two children, George and Mary, both of whom were minors and left in the guardianship of friends. Now we have mentioned that Susannah, wife of Thomas(3) Clark, was married to him by 1700, and it is difficult to see how a boy who was under guardianship in 1679 could have had a daughter who was married just 21 years later. All that can be said is that it is barely possibly that Susannah, wife of Thomas Clark, was a daughter of this George Williams. In favor of the hypothesis is the fact that if the Thomas Clark of George Williams' will was not Thomas(4) Clark, son of Thomas(3) and Susannah, it is hard to tell who else it could have been, for there is no other Thomas Clark revealed by the records from 1744-48, except Thomas(4).

Thomas(3) Clark moved back to Surry County by 1713, for Thomas Pittman of Isle of Wight deeded to Thomas Clark of Surry, planter, 150 acres in Lawnes Creek Parish Nov. 17, 1713 (D&W 1709-14, p. 164). He remained in Surry County until November 19, 1723, when he deeded the above land to Thomas Morland of Isle of Wight, and his wife Susannah relinquished her dower in it (D&W 1715-30, p. 501-2). The family then moved to Bertie County, N.C., just across the border from Isle of Wight Co., Va., and Thomas(3) Clark died there in 1728. The will of Thomas Clarke, dated April 25, 1728, leaves a bequest to his son Thomas Clarke; leaves the rest of his estate to his wife, and at her death or marriage to be divided among his 9 children, Thomas, Elizabeth, Mary, Lewis, William, John, Matthew, Grace and Bridget; mentions his two plantations on the county line adjoining Thomas Boykin, and that his wife is not to falsify the promise made to Nehemiah Joyner that he should possess some of the land during his (Nehemiah's) wife's life; appoints his wife and son Thomas executors; witnesses, Nehemiah Joyner and Ellis Braddy (N.C. Wills to 1760, Bertie County, Vol. VI., p. 51, at Raleigh). The wife Susannah Clark was still living on Feb. 13, 1732/3, when she deeded 50 acres near the county line adjoining Thomas Boykin to James Joyner (probably a son of Nehemiah and Elizabeth Brown Joyner) (Bertie Co. D.B. "D", p. 29).1 

Family

Susannah (?) (say 1680 - after 1733)
Child
ChartsWLC / Warren L. Culpepper Ancestral Chart
Last Edited1 Apr 2003

Citations

  1. B. C. Holtzclaw, "Clark of Surry and Isle of Wight Counties," Southern Genealogies #1, Historical Southern Families, Vol. IFTM CD191.

Susannah (?)1,2

Female, #45857, (say 1680 - after 1733)
Birth*say 1680 She was born say 1680. 
Marriage*say 1699 She married Thomas Clarke (3) say 1699.2 
Married Namesay 1700  As of say 1700, her married name was Clarke.2 
Birth of Soncirca 1703 Her son Thomas Clarke (4) was born circa 1703 at Isle of Wight Co., Virginia.2 
Death*after 1733 She died after 1733.2 

Family

Thomas Clarke (3) (circa 1677 - 1728)
Child
ChartsWLC / Warren L. Culpepper Ancestral Chart
Last Edited1 Jan 2012

Citations

  1. A discussion of Susannah's possible surname will be found in the biography for her husband, Thomas Clark.
  2. B. C. Holtzclaw, "Clark of Surry and Isle of Wight Counties," Southern Genealogies #1, Historical Southern Families, Vol. IFTM CD191.

Thomas Clarke (2)1

Male, #45858, (say 1652 - 1700)
Father*Thomas Clarke (1)1 (s 1622 - 1675)
Mother*Elizabeth Penny1 (s 1655 - a 1695)
Birth*say 1652 He was born say 1652 at Isle of Wight Co., Virginia.1 
Marriage*say 1672 He married Elizabeth Sampson say 1672.1 
Death of Father1675 His father Thomas Clarke (1) died in 1675 at Isle of Wight Co., Virginia.1 
Birth of Soncirca 1677 His son Thomas Clarke (3) was born circa 1677 at Virginia.1 
Birth of Sonsay 1680 His son Sampson Clarke was born say 1680.1 
Death*1700 He died in 1700.1 
Biography* Thomas(2) Clarke of Isle of Wight was born about 1650-55, and died about 1700. He married about 1670-75 Elizabeth, daughter of James Sampson, who was apparently a widow Brown at the time of the marriage, and had a son John Browne, b. 1669. Thomas(2) Clarke was probably the son of Thomas(l) Clarke and Elizabeth Penny, and identical with the grandson Thomas Clarke mentioned in Richard Penny's will. There is some slight doubt about this identification, as it would mean that Elizabeth Penny must have married Thomas(l) Clarke almost immediately after 1651, when as "Elizabeth Penny" she was left a bequest by William Jewry, must have borne her son Thomas very shortly, and that Richard Penny must have been a very old man, around 80-85 years old, when he died in 1694. However, the assumption seems reasonable. Thomas Clarke and his wife Elizabeth Sampson had three children; Sampson, Thomas, and Grace Clarke, who married Robert Reynolds, Jr., of Surry County. The proof regarding the family of Thomas(2) Clarke and his wife, Elizabeth Sampson, is indirect, but seems to be fully confirmed by the following records regarding the Sampson and Barcroft families and their descendants:

(1) Charles Barcroft was the grandfather of Elizabeth (Sampson) Clarke. He was granted 300 acres in Isle of Wight County, Feb. 10, 1637) C. & P., p. 80). On June 17, 1647, Elizabeth Barcroft was granted 1200 acres of land in Isle of Wight County (id. p. 166). This was Charles Barcroft's daughter, Elizabeth, who married James Sampson, for her son, James Sampson, Jr., still held this 1200 acres in the Quit Rent Rolls of 1704. Mr. Barcroft claims land for importing Charles Barcroft for the 4th time, indicating that he made frequent trips to England. Mr. Barcrofts will was dated March 12, 1654, and leaves his property to his son William and wife Magdalen (Chapman I, 3), but he apparently did not die until 1661, for administration on his estate was granted his son-in-law, George Moore, Sept. 23, 1661 (id. , p. 89). George Moore married Jane, daughter of Charles Barcroft, so that the latter had three children, William, Jane and Elizabeth. The son William apparently died unmarried, as he disappears from the records. George Moore, who married Jane Barcroft, was usually known as Lieutenant George Moore, was born in 1632, and died in 1714. From his will and other documents, he had four daughters: (1) Magdalen Moore, who married Thomas Carter and had sons George and Thomas Carter; (2) Eleanor Moore, who married Richard Piland. (Richard died in 1695, his will mentioning his wife and 5 children, two of these being George and Thomas Piland mentioned in George Moore's will and two others probably being James and Richard Piland, who appears in documents in Surry and Isle of Wight in connection with their relatives, the Clarkes, Browns, Wilsons, etc. ); (3) Ann Moore married Thomas White and had issue, Jane, John, Moore Thomas, William and Henry White; and (4) a daughter who married a Williams and had sons Samuel and John Williams mentioned in George Moore's will (Chapman, Wills, I, 79-80; "Marriages", pp. 9, 41, 54; D. B.1, p.161).

(2) James Sampson first appears in the records of Isle of Wight County, in 1664, when he signed as "James Sampson of Stevenheath Parish in County Middlesex, Shipwright" (D. & W. No. 1, p. 21). On Dec. 3, 1666, he and his wife, Elizabeth, receipted George Moore for Elizabeth's share of the estate of her father, Charles Barcroft (id. , P6;9 84). Elizabeth Barcroft Sampson was still living March 15, 1669/70, when she witnessed the will of Thomas Wooten (Chapman, Wills, I, 14), but died before her husband's death in 1689. James Sampson's will, dated Feb. 4, 1688/9 and probated in Isle of Wight County, April 9, 1689, leaves a rather large estate to the following legatees: daughter Margaret, wife of Nicholas Wilson; Mr. George Moore and his wife; son James Sampson; "my daughter Clarke"; John Browne; and in a codicil mentions that his deceased wife on her death bed requested that he take notice that she left her two daughters, Margaret and Elizabeth, 300 acres apiece of the land, which the testator desired to be done provided the law permitted (Chapman, Wills I, p. 43). This land was obviously the 1200 acres granted to Elizabeth Barcroft in 1647. Apparently the law did not permit its disposal to the daughters, for the son James Sampson still owned the 1200 acres in 1704, as mentioned previously. This son, James Sampson, Jr., died in Isle of Wight County in 1728. His will, dated Nov. 30, 1727, and probated March 25, 1728, mentions a son Barcroft Sampson, and daughters Margaret, Elizabeth, and Anne, wife of Nicholas Derring (Chapman, II, 36). Margaret, daughter of James and Elizabeth (Barcroft) Sampson, married Nicholas Wilson, who died in 1696 (appraisement Dec. 9, 1696). This couple had three children; James, Anne, and Sampson Wilson (Chapman, Wills, I, 49; I. of W.D.B. I, p. 42). Margaret Wilson died in Isle of Wight County about 1698, her nuncupative will mentioning her son James, stating that Mr. Moore and James Sampson should have nothing to do with her estate, and appointing Thomas Clarke and John Browne her executors (Chapman, I, 54). Thomas Clarke gave bond for the guardianship of James Wilson, July 20, 1698 (D.B. 1, p. 264). The above records show that Elizabeth Sampson, the "daughter Clarke" of James Sampson's will, was the wife of Thomas Clark. Thomas(2) Clark died between 1698 and 1701. He may have been still living March 22, 1700, when Thomas Clarke witnessed the will of John Page (Chapman I, p. 61), though this Thomas may have been his son, Thomas(3). He was certainly dead by April 25, 1701, when Elizabeth Clark, widow, was granted administration on the estate of William Wilmott (Chapman I, 114).

(3) John Browne, mentioned in James Sampson's will, was a grandson, as he calls Nicholas and Margaret Wilson "uncle" and aunt" in a deposition made in 1694 (Boddie, 17 Cent., p. 616). The deposition shows that he was born in 1669. As James Sampson had only the two daughters, Elizabeth Clarke and Margaret Wilson, John Browne was probably a son of Elizabeth Clarke by a first marriage. This view is confirmed by the will of Grace Reynolds, widow of Robert Reynolds, Jr., in Surry County in 1711. The will, dated Dec. 15, 1711, and probated Dec. 19, 1711, mentions a bequest to Sarah Brown, a mulatto woman; leaves the bulk of her property to her daughter Mary Reynolds; but in case Mary should die, the property to go to her kinswomen, Hester Brown, daughter of John Brown, Mary Clark, daughter of Sampson Clark, and Susannah Clark, daughter of Thomas Clark (Surry D. & W., 1709-14, p. 92). Thomas and Sampson Clarke, mentioned in the will, were living together in one household in Surry County in 1699. The name Sampson indicates a connection with the Sampson family of Isle of Wight, and the above will connecting them with John Brown strengthens the hypothesis. Thomas and Sampson Clarke were sons of Thomas(2) Clark and his wife Elizabeth Sampson, and John Brown was their half-brother. Grace Reynolds was probably a whole sister of the Clarkes and a half-sister of John Brown. My reason for assuming this is that Robert Reynolds, Jr., Grace's husband, first appears as a tithable in Surry County in the family of his father, Robert Reynolds, Sr., in 1692, which would put his birth in 1675 or 1676. The Clarke brothers were both tithables and presumbably of age in 1699, which would put their births around 1675 and 1677. Grace Reynolds was probably somewhat younger, since she married a man born about 1675-6. She was apparently, therefore, a daughter of Thomas(2) Clarke and Elizabeth Sampson.

The relationship is further confirmed by the fact that Thomas(3) Clarke, in his will in 1728 which will be cited below, states that Nehemiah Joyner was to occupy some of the Clark land during the life of his (Nehemiah's) wife. Nehemiah Joyner married Elizabeth, daughter of John Brown, so that if the above hypothesis is correct, she was Thomas3 Clark's half-niece. John Brown died in Surry County in 1714, his inventory being handed in by his widow, Elizabeth Brown, June 6, 1714. He left one son and four daughters, Sylvester Brown, Hester Brantley, Grace, wife of John Warren, Elizabeth, wife of Nehemiah Joyner, and Susannah Brown, as shown by the following records: (1) Bertie County, N.C. , D.B. "C", p. 168, shows that in 1727 Susannah Brown, John Warren and Grace his wife, and Sylvester Brown of Bertie County made a deed of gift to their sister Elizabeth Joyner of all their right to 256 acres granted July 28, 1713, to "John Brown, our father, deceased". (2) The wall of Hester Brantly, probated in 1727 in Surry County, Va., mentions her daughters Priscilla and Elizabeth; sisters Elizabeth Joyner and Grace Warren; and appoints James Wilson and James Piland executors (D.&W. 1715-30, p. 274). This is obviously the "kinswoman', Hester daughter of John Brorin, mentioned in Grace Reynold's will. The connection. with the Sampson and Barcroft families is further shown by the names ot the executors of Hester Brantly. James Wilson was a son of Margaret (Sampson) Wilson, and James Piland was a grandson o£ George and Jane (Barcroft) Moore. (3) That the sister, Elizabeth Joyner, in the above records was the wife of Nehemiah Joyner, is shown by a deed in Isle of Wight County May 16, 1729, in which Nehemiah aqd Elizabeth his wife deeded land to Abraham Stevenson (D.B. 4, p. 148).1 

Family

Elizabeth Sampson (say 1655 - )
Marriage*say 1672 He married Elizabeth Sampson say 1672.1 
Children
ChartsWLC / Warren L. Culpepper Ancestral Chart
Last Edited20 Aug 2002

Citations

  1. B. C. Holtzclaw, "Clark of Surry and Isle of Wight Counties," Southern Genealogies #1, Historical Southern Families, Vol. IFTM CD191.

Elizabeth Sampson1

Female, #45859, (say 1655 - )
Birth*say 1655 She was born say 1655.1 
Marriage*say 1672 She married Thomas Clarke (2) say 1672.1 
Married Namesay 1672  As of say 1672, her married name was Clarke.1 
Birth of Soncirca 1677 Her son Thomas Clarke (3) was born circa 1677 at Virginia.1 
Birth of Sonsay 1680 Her son Sampson Clarke was born say 1680.1 

Family

Thomas Clarke (2) (say 1652 - 1700)
Children
ChartsWLC / Warren L. Culpepper Ancestral Chart
Last Edited1 Jan 2012

Citations

  1. B. C. Holtzclaw, "Clark of Surry and Isle of Wight Counties," Southern Genealogies #1, Historical Southern Families, Vol. IFTM CD191.

Sampson Clarke1

Male, #45860, (say 1680 - after 1712)
Father*Thomas Clarke (2)1 (s 1652 - 1700)
Mother*Elizabeth Sampson1 (s 1655 - )
Birth*say 1680 He was born say 1680.1 
Death*after 1712 He died after 1712.1 
Biography* Sampson(3) Clarke, son of Thomas(2) and Elizabeth (Sampson) Clarke, moved to Surry County, where he was living as head of a household in 1699 along with his brother, Thomas(3) Clarke. Sampson is shown alone in the tithables of 1700-1702, his brother having temporarily moved back to Isle of Wight County. He was executor of Grace Reynolds (mentioned above as a sister) and handed in an account of her estate Dec. 17, 1712 in Surry County. (D.&.W. 1709-14, p. 130). After this he disappears from the records of Surry County. In addition to his daughter Mary, mentioned in in Grace Reynolds' will, he was almost certainly the father of James Sampson Clark, who married Joyce ---------, and died in Surry County in 1752. His will, probated in 1752, mentions his wife, Joyce, and children; Lucy, Ann, Patty, Sampson, William, James, Mary, Elizabeth, Sarah and Mary. The widow, Joyce Clark, died in Surry County in 1775. Her will, dated July 28, 1773, and probated Feb. 28, 1775, mentions her sons Sampson and James; daughters Mary White, Elizabeth Gwaltney, Lucy Harris, Martha Clarke (born in Virginia, died in 1820 in North Carolina). Mrs. Duncan McLeod Moore (Elizabeth Clarke) of Washington, N.C., another descendant, writes that the children of James Sampson and his wife Joyce were as follows:

(1) Their daughter, Winifred Clarke, married James Davis; their daughter Mary Davis married James Gwaltney, Jr; William Gray Gwaltney was a son of this couple, and by his wife Sarah Holland, he had a daughter, Oceana Winifred Gwaltney, who married Samuel Edwin West; and this last couple were grandparents of Mr. James G. W. MacClamroch of Greensboro, N. C.

(2) Sampson Clarke, son of James Sampson and Joyce Clarke, died in Surry County in 1778. His will, dated June 10, 1776, and probated Feb. 24, 1778, mentions sons William and James Clarke; daughters Mary, Sarah, and Anne; wife Martha and Thomas Gwaltney, exrs. The following statement regarding Sampson Clarke and his descendants was made by Miss Polly Clarke about 1880, when she was about 85 years old, to her nephew George T. Clarke (grandfather of Ashton W. Clarke of Newport News, Va. ): "Sampson Clarke, son of James Sampson Clarke, was my grandfather. His wife was Patsy (Martha) Bell, a sister of Benjamin Bell; and his children were William Clarke, James Clarke, Polly Parsons wife of Joe Parsons, Annie Parsons wife of Henry Parsons, and Sallie Clarke. He lost his life in the Revolution. I don't know whether or not he died or was killed. I have heard my grandmother say that he came home once on a furlough, returned to the army, and never came back any more. James Clarke (son of Sampson Clarke) was the father of Col. James S. Clarke. William Clarke (son of Sampson) was my father. His wife, my mother, was Sallie Gwaltney, daughter of Patrick Gwaltney and Mollie his wife. My father's and mother's children were Sampson Clarke, Champion Ciarke, Wilmouth Clarke, Willis Clarke, Polly Clarke, Watson Clarke, William Clarke, Ann Rogers wife of John Rogers, Patrick Clarke, Fielding Clarke, Merit Clarke, Simmons Clarke, and James Clarke. My brother Willis Clarke's wife was Zillah Delk, daughter of James and Martha Delk. Their children were two girls that died unnamed, George Talbert Clarke, and Sarah Virginia Gwaltney, wife of Leonard H. Gwaltney." Mr. George T. Clarke adds to the above account: "William Clarke (son of Sallie Gwaltney Clarke) married Mrs. Ann Blow, widow of Henry Blow, and had one daughter, Martha Ann Clarke, who married William W. Parsons and had eight children. ------ Patrick Clarke, (son of William and Sallie Gwaltney Clarke) married Rhoda Williams and died without children."

(3) Miss Polly Clarke, in the statement quoted above, mentions in the first paragraph that her great-grandparents were James Sampson and Joyce Clarke, and that they had the following children: Sampson Clarke, James Clarke, Sallie Thompson wife of Joel Thompson, Rebecca Lancaster wife of James Lancaster, Winnie Davis wife of James Davis, Mollie White wife of William White, Patsy Pendleton, Lucy Harris wife of Harman Harris, and a daughter who married a Pleasants.

(4) Miss S. Elizabeth Clarke of Washington, N.C., wrote me in 1933 that she was a descendant of James Sampson Clarke (b. March 12, 1797), who was son of James Sampson Clarke (born in Virginia, died in 1820 in North Carolina). Mrs. Duncan McLeod Moore (Elizabeth Clarke) of Washington, N.C., another descendant, writes that James Sampson Clarke married Martha Ann Elizabeth Lanier, and that the tradition was that James Sampson Clarke and a brother William came to Pitt County, N.C., from Virginia. This James Sampson Clarke, who died in 1820 in North Carolina, was probably son of James Clarke, son of James Sampson and Joyce Clarke.1 
Last Edited20 Aug 2002

Citations

  1. B. C. Holtzclaw, "Clark of Surry and Isle of Wight Counties," Southern Genealogies #1, Historical Southern Families, Vol. IFTM CD191.

Thomas Clarke (1)1

Male, #45861, (say 1622 - 1675)
Birth*say 1622 He was born say 1622.1 
Marriage*say 1650 He married Elizabeth Penny say 1650.1 
Birth of Sonsay 1652 His son Thomas Clarke (2) was born say 1652 at Isle of Wight Co., Virginia.1 
Death*1675 He died at Isle of Wight Co., Virginia, in 1675.1 
Biography* B. C. Holtzclaw, in "Clark of Surry and Isle of Wight Counties" (FTM CD191, Southern Genealogies #1, Historical Southern Families, Vol. I) says: "The tradition in the Clark family is that the original immigrant to Virginia was a Scotsman. If so, the name should properly be spelled Clarke, and many of the descendants of the family do spell it thus. However, others, including many of my own immediate family spell it Clark (without the "e"), and this is the way it is spelled in the Family Bible of my great-great-grandfather, William Clark 1763-1831).

"Thomas Clarke first appears in the records of Isle of Wight County, Va., June 14, 1662, when he, Richard Penny, and Thomas Parker appraised the estate of John Brewer (Chapman, "Wills", I, 15). He was dead by April 9, 1675, when Elizabeth, his relict, was appointed his administratrix, her securities being Richard Penny and Humphrey Marshall (id., p. 101). Richard Penny was the father and Humphrey Marshall was the nephew of Elizabeth Clarke. Elizabeth Penny is mentioned as early as Jan. 1, 1651/2, when William Jewry left a bequest to Elizabeth, daughter of Richard Penny (id. , p. 1). She married (2) after Thomas Clarkes's death a Mr. Noyall, and as "Elizabeth Noyall" witnessed in 1695 the will of her brother-in-law, James Patridge (id. , p, 6). The mother of Elizabeth and wife of Richard Penny was named Mary, as shown by a deed March 11, 1666/7 (Boddie "17th Cent. I. of W. Co.", p. 548). The Isle of Wight records show that Richard Penny lived for a time in Nansemond County and that he was active in the troubles connected with Bacon's Rebellion in Isle of Wight County. Richard Penny died in Isle of Wight County in 1694. His will, dated April 14, 1693, and probated June 9, 1694, mentions his eldest daughter Frances Patridge; daughter Elizabeth Noyell, grandchildren, Elizabeth and Thomas Clarke; son John; grandson Richard Penny; granddaughter Mary, daughter of John Penny, granddaughter Mary, daughter of Will Penny; Elizabeth, daughter of Will Penny; son Will; daughter Mary, wife of Robert Marshall; and grandson Richard Grey (Chapman I, p. 50)."1
 

Family

Elizabeth Penny (say 1655 - after 1695)
Child
ChartsWLC / Warren L. Culpepper Ancestral Chart
Last Edited20 Aug 2002

Citations

  1. B. C. Holtzclaw, "Clark of Surry and Isle of Wight Counties," Southern Genealogies #1, Historical Southern Families, Vol. IFTM CD191.

Elizabeth Penny1

Female, #45862, (say 1655 - after 1695)
Father*Richard Penny1 (s 1625 - 1694)
Mother*Mary (?)1 (s 1628 - )
Marriage*say 1650 She married Thomas Clarke (1) say 1650.1 
Married Namesay 1650  As of say 1650, her married name was Clarke. 
Birth of Sonsay 1652 Her son Thomas Clarke (2) was born say 1652 at Isle of Wight Co., Virginia.1 
Birth*say 1655 She was born say 1655.1 
Married Namesay 1670  As of say 1670, her married name was Clark.1 
Death*after 1695 She died after 1695.1 

Family

Thomas Clarke (1) (say 1622 - 1675)
Child
ChartsWLC / Warren L. Culpepper Ancestral Chart
Last Edited1 Jan 2012

Citations

  1. B. C. Holtzclaw, "Clark of Surry and Isle of Wight Counties," Southern Genealogies #1, Historical Southern Families, Vol. IFTM CD191.

Richard Penny1

Male, #45863, (say 1625 - 1694)
Birth*say 1625 He was born say 1625.1 
Marriage*say 1650 He married Mary (?) say 1650.1 
Death*1694 He died at Isle of Wight Co., Virginia, in 1694.1 

Family

Mary (?) (say 1628 - )
Child
ChartsWLC / Warren L. Culpepper Ancestral Chart
Last Edited20 Aug 2002

Citations

  1. B. C. Holtzclaw, "Clark of Surry and Isle of Wight Counties," Southern Genealogies #1, Historical Southern Families, Vol. IFTM CD191.

Mary (?)1

Female, #45864, (say 1628 - )
Birth*say 1628 She was born say 1628.1 
Marriage*say 1650 She married Richard Penny say 1650.1 
Married Namesay 1650  As of say 1650, her married name was Penny.1 

Family

Richard Penny (say 1625 - 1694)
Child
ChartsWLC / Warren L. Culpepper Ancestral Chart
Last Edited1 Jan 2012

Citations

  1. B. C. Holtzclaw, "Clark of Surry and Isle of Wight Counties," Southern Genealogies #1, Historical Southern Families, Vol. IFTM CD191.

William Clarke1

Male, #45865, (1763 - 16 Jan 1831)
Father*John Clarke1 (1728 - 1794)
Mother*Judith Mallet1 (2 Sep 1736 - )
Birth*1763 He was born in 1763 at Lunenburg Co., Virginia.1 
Death of Father1794 His father John Clarke died in 1794 at Edgefield District, South Carolina
Death*16 Jan 1831 He died at Putnam Co., Georgia, on 16 Jan 1831.1 
Biography* William(6) Clark, son of John(5) and Judith (Mallett) Clark, was born in Lunenburg Co., Va. in 1763 and died in Putman Co., Ga. Jan. 16, 1831. On Oct. 23, 1792 he married (probably in Greene Co., Ga., where her father was living at the time) Mary Harvey, daughter of Evan Harvey and his wife Charity Powell, and niece of James Harvey who married his sister, Sarah Clark (see Harvey, Powell, and Williams Families). She was born Sept. 22, 1776, probably in Edgefield Co., S.C., and died Nov. 8, 1830 in Putnam Co., Ga., William Clark was a soldier in the Revolution under Gen. Elijah Clarke and on Oct. 1, 1784 was granted land in Washington Co., Ga. for his services (see also, Smith "Story of Ga. and the Ga. People", p. 614, where William Clark is cited as a soldier). This land fell into Greene Co. on the organization of that county and William Clark lived there for a number of years, but later moved to Putnam Co., Ga. and was one of the first settlers there. William and Mary Clark were faithful members of the Baptist Church, and built a large and commodious home in the Kinderhook Neighborhood in Putnam Co., where their youngest son, Benjamin W. Clark, later lived. I saw the house in my youth, but it has since been burned. Further details regarding William and Mary Clark and their family will be found in the biography of their son, Rev. John H. Clarke, in "Georgia Baptists, Historical and Biographical" by J. H. Campbell (p. 492 ff), but will be omitted here through lack of space. The children of William and Mary Clark were the following (dates of birth, etc. being taken from their Family Bible, which is now in my possession):

I. Jeremiah(7) Clark, b. Jan. 11, 1794, d. April 5, 1849, married four, times, his first wife being a Miss Henderson and his second a widow, Mrs. Abercrombie. He had the following six children: Benjamin, William, James, Jeremiah, Elizabeth and Emma.

II. Rev. John(7) Harvey Clark, son of Wiiliam(6) and Mary Clark, was born Nov. 30, 1796 in Greene Co., Ga., and died Apr. 23, 1867 at Henderson, Houston Co., Ga. He married in Putnam Co., Ga., Dec. 28, 1820 Elizabeth Kendrick (b. 1805, d. after 1878), daughter of James and Tabitha (Rogers) Kendrick (see Kendrick Family). He joined Enon Baptist Church in Putman Co. about 1828, and was one of the charter members of Ramoth Baptist Church along with his wife on the organization of that church in 1836. He served for several years as a deacon at Ramoth, but was finally ordained to the Baptist ministry there Nov. 13, 1847. He was a pastor for several years in Putnam, Jones and Baldwin Cos., but moved to Houston Co., Ga. in 1854, and later served churches in that county, Macon, Dooly and Lee Cos. The eight children of Rev. John H. and Elizabeth (Kendrick) Clark were: James M., Mary Ann, Charity C., Benjamin, Sarah, Judson, Isabella S. and Frances.

III. Judge James(7) Clarke, son of William(6) and Mary Clark, was born Aug. 28, 1798, and died after 1876 in Atlanta, Ga. He married (1) Martha Alexander of Putnam Co., Ga. in 1822 and had one son, William. He then married (2) Permelia S. Wellborn of Putnam Co., a sister of Congressman Marshall S. Wellborn, by whom he had seven children: Elizabeth, Mary, John Thomas, Ameba, Marshall J., Alice and Eugenia.

IV. Jesse Clark, son of William6 and Mary Clark, b. June 4, 1800 died young.

V. Charity(7) Clark, b. Dec. 15, 1808, d. Aug. 11, 1867 in Houston Co., Ga., married Ephraim Jones Kendrick (b. 1797 in Washington Co. , Ga., d. 1854 in Houston Co., Ga.) son of Martin and Jane (Whitehead) Kendrick, of Putnam Co., Ga. (see Kendrick Family). They had 13 children: William, Sarah, Jane Malvina, Mary, Martin van Buren, John, Eliza Caroline, Civility Coates, Permelia Elizabeth, Benjamin Campbell, James Dawson, Amanda Louisa and Martha Virginia.

VI. Evan(7) Harvey Clark, son of William(6) and Mary Clark, b. June 25, 1806, died young.

VII. Benjamin(7) Williams Clark, son of William(6) and Mary Clark, was born in Putnam Co., Ga., July 9, 1810, and died there July 4, 1886, while attending services at Ramoth Baptist Church, of which he and his first wife were charter members in 1836, and of which he had been a deacon since 1848. During the War between the States he went to defend Atlanta among the old men and boys called up by Gov. Brown at the last for that purpose. Benjamin W. Clark married (1) Oct. 25, 1832, Julia Caroline Kendrick (b. 1813, d. Jan. 19, 1850), daughter of James and Tabitha Rogers Kendrick of Putnam Co. (see Kendrick Family) He married (2) Sept. 2, 1851, Permelia A. Haughton (b. 1813, d. April 1, 1885). By his second marriage, he had one son, Benjamin Willis Alexander Clark, b. Nov. 12, 1855, who died unmarried as a young man. Benjamin W. Clark lived all his life in the home and on the plantation of his father, William6 Clark, and is buried in the Clark family burying ground there, along with his two wives, his father and mother, William and Mary Clark, and his first wife's parents, James and Tabitha Kendrick. A tablet to his memory stands in Ramoth Church. By his first marriage to Julia Caroline Kendrick, Benjamin Williams Clark had the following six children: Mary Etta, William, Virginia Ann Judson, Adeline Elizabeth, Julia Frances and Emma Louisa.

[Note: There were many descendants of Benjamin Williams Clark detailed in the original version of this document by B. C. Holtzclaw, "Clark of Surry and Isle of Wight Counties", FTM CD191, Southern Genealogies #1, Historical Southern Families, Vol. I]1

 
Last Edited24 Apr 2008

Citations

  1. B. C. Holtzclaw, "Clark of Surry and Isle of Wight Counties," Southern Genealogies #1, Historical Southern Families, Vol. IFTM CD191.

Mary Elizabeth Camm1

Female, #45867, (say 1620 - )
Birth*say 1620 She was born say 1620.1 
Married Namecirca 1640  As of circa 1640, her married name was Whitaker.1 
Birth of Son1643 Her son Richard Whitaker was born in 1643 at Warwick Co., Virginia.2 

Family

Child
ChartsWLC / Warren L. Culpepper Ancestral Chart
Last Edited20 Aug 2002

Citations

  1. RootsWeb WorldConnect Project, Ancestry.com: Rootsweb.
    http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/
    Whittaker Family (Mad Genealogist).
  2. E-mail written 1998-2008 to Lew Griffin & Warren Culpepper from William Randle 'Bill' Culpepper (#10088), e-mail address.
    Tree #6019Date of Import: Jan 15, 1998.

Lady Mary M. Bourchier1

Female, #45869, (say 1598 - after 1649)
Birth*say 1598 She was born say 1598.1 
Married Namecirca 1616  As of circa 1616, her married name was Lady Whitaker.1 
Death*after 1649 She died at Virginia after 1649.1 
Last Edited31 Dec 2008

Citations

  1. RootsWeb WorldConnect Project, Ancestry.com: Rootsweb.
    http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/
    Whittaker Family (Mad Genealogist).

Mary A. B. (?)1

Female, #45870, (say 1801 - )
Birth*say 1801 She was born say 1801.1 
Marriage*say 1821 She married Bennett Sims say 1821.1 
Married Namesay 1821  As of say 1821, her married name was Sims. 
Name-AltSpellsay 1821 This surname is sometimes spelled Simms. 
1830 Census1 Jun 1830 Mary and Biddie was probably a free white female, age 20 and under 30, in Bennett Sims's household, on the 1830 Census at Oglethorpe Co., Georgia.2 

Family

Bennett Sims (17 Nov 1798 - )
Last Edited23 Jul 2012

Citations

  1. E-mail written 2001 - 2004 to Warren L. Culpepper from Corine Simms Reynolds (#45262), (deceased 2005).
  2. 1830 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 75, Oglethorpe Co., GA, Ancestry.com image 27
    Bennet Sims, 1 M10-15, 1 M30-40, 1 F5-10, 1 F15-20, 2 F20-30, 1 F50-60 (Mary Hartsfield Sims)
    Next to brother Murry in census.