Joel Culpepper of Crawford Co., GA

Male, #32048, (12 Mar 1795 - 6 Dec 1839)
Father*John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL (1 Oct 1772 - 13 May 1855)
Mother*Nancy Gillespie (c 1778 - 25 Jul 1848)
DNA* To help confirm Joel Culpepper of Crawford Co., GA's descent from Henry Culpepper of Lower Norfolk, we are seeking a male Culpepper descendant of Joel's to participate in our free DNA testing project. For more information, go to: http://gen.culpepper.com/dna
Birth*12 Mar 1795 Joel was born at Orangeburg District, South Carolina, on 12 Mar 1795. 
1800 Census4 Aug 1800 Joel, Daniel and John was probably a free white male, under 10 years old, in John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL's houseshold on the 1800 Census at Lexington District, South Carolina.1 
1810 Census6 Aug 1810 John and Joel was probably a free white male, age 10 and under 16, in John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL's household on the 1810 Census at Richland District, South Carolina. Unaccounted for are 1 male 0-10 and 1 female 16-26..2,3 
War of 1812*between 1813 and 1814 He served in the War of 1812 between 1813 and 1814
(Austin's Regiment, South Carolina Militia.)4 
Marriage*circa 1820 He married Nancy Corley at Lexington District, South Carolina, circa 1820. 
Birth of Son13 Jan 1822 His son John L. Culpepper was born on 13 Jan 1822 at Lexington District, South Carolina
Birth of Son16 Jul 1824 His son Charles William Culpepper was born on 16 Jul 1824 at Lexington District, South Carolina.5 
Birth of Son23 Feb 1829 His son James D. Culpepper was born on 23 Feb 1829 at Crawford Co., Georgia.6 
1830 Census*1 Jun 1830 Joel was listed as the head of a family on the 1830 Census at Crawford Co., Georgia.7 
Birth of Son30 Jan 1831 His son Daniel Culpepper was born on 30 Jan 1831 at Crawford Co., Georgia
Land Lottery*1832 He had a fortunate draw in the land lottery in 1832 at Crawford Co., Georgia,
lot 1060/21/2 in either what became Cass (later Bartow) or Cherokee Co., GA.8 
Birth of Son31 Dec 1833 His son Elijah Milton Culpepper was born on 31 Dec 1833 at Crawford Co., Georgia
Death*6 Dec 1839 He died at Crawford Co., Georgia, on 6 Dec 1839 at age 44. 
Biography* Mrs. J. W. (Ira Gay) Deam of Gay, GA, a great-granddaughter of Joel Culpepper, preserved a copy of the John Culpepper Bible record of Joel's birth which was copied by Mrs. D. W. (Lavyn Wright) Sisco as follows: _________________________Joel Culpepper _________________________b. March 12, 1795 _________________________On Tuesday about daybreak
A perpetual calendar shows that 12 Mar 1795 would have been a Thursday. Perhaps there was some difficulty reading the handwriting. Joel was born in Orangeburg District, SC in an area which would be designated as Lexington District in the 1800 census and which would be formally designated Lexington District, SC in 1804. Naming conventions called for the oldest son to be named after the father's father, in which case, Joel should have been named John, assuming that John Culpepper's father had also been named John. Instead, John named his oldest son Joel, a name which was used by later generations as a diminutive or nickname for Joseph. It is assumed that Joel was named for his presumed uncle, Joseph Culpepper.
Other Joel Culpepper's have been identified living in South Carolina and Georgia during this general time period and an attempt has been made to track them so that they do not confuse an already complicated picture. The first record we have of this Joel Culpepper is in the 1800 census of Lexington District, SC in the household of his father, John Culpepper. Joel was also noted living with his parents in the 1810 census of Richland District, SC. At this point, he would have been 15 years old. Joel would have been 17 years old at the beginning of the War of 1812 and the war would have put any plans he or his family had on hold. If Joel fought in this war, presumably it would have been in South Carolina, and no record of service has yet been found. At some point, possibly because of the war and apparently before the 1813 birth of Joel's brother, William Henry Culpepper, Joel's parents moved again, to Edgefield District, SC. It is not known if Joel moved with his parents or if he stayed behind but it is suspected that he might have stayed behind since his future wife was living in Lexington District, SC at the time. Since Richland District was across the Congaree River from Lexington District, Joel might have stayed with other relatives or on family land in either location.
The date and location of Joel's marriage to Nancy Corley is not known but would presumably have been between 1815 and 1820 and near Nancy's home. Nancy's father, Lawrence Corley, was recorded with his wife and some of his children in the 1810 census of Lexington District, SC. He died in December 1815, but his widow, Barbara (Derrick) Corley was recorded in the same district in the 1820 census. If, as descendants believe, Joel's second son, Charles William Culpepper, was born in Lexington District, SC in 1824, then Joel and Nancy probably were married there and remained near her family until they moved to Georgia. Unfortunately, Joel and Nancy have not been found in the 1820 census of South Carolina or Georgia. Possibly they were living in Lexington District, SC near Nancy's widowed mother but were overlooked in the census.
Since Joel's son, Charles William Culpepper, who was born in 1824, specified in census records that he was born in South Carolina and younger children were listed in the 1850 census as having been born in Georgia, it seems likely that Joel and Nancy moved their family to Georgia around 1825. A Lexington, SC researcher, Lee R. Gandee, wrote in a 23 May 1974 letter to Billy W. Dunn: Then nearly all the people in this area pulled up and left, either to the area around Montezuma, Georgia or to Alabama--Kirkpartricks, Taylors, Fitzpatricks, Threewittses--Geigers--everybody who was anybody, for the River began destroying the low land by floods by 1800, and by 1830 the River swamps were grown up in a jungle and stagnant water made it a death-feeding pesthole of fevers as malaria and dengue-carrying mosquitoes swarmed....
No deed records have been found in Georgia for Joel. Since the occupations of his sons included shoemaker, merchant, tanner and blacksmith as well as farmer, it is possible that Joel was a tradesman. However, an administrator was appointed at Joel's death to sell "perishable property" which suggests that he was a farmer. Joel was recorded with his wife and four children in 1830 census of Crawford Co., GA. As a married man with children, who was a U. S. citizen and who had resided in Georgia for three years, Joel would have been eligible for two draws in the 1832 Gold Lottery of Georgia. He apparently drew lot 1060 in district 21 of section 2. This would have been a 40 acre lot near the point where what is now Cherokee, Bartow and Cobb counties meet. It is not known if he ever mined the land or if he sold the lot.
Mrs. J. W. Deam and Mrs. D. W. Sisco also preserved Joel Culpepper's death record from the John Culpepper Bible: _________________________d. December 6, 1839
Mrs. W. B. (M. Louise Culpepper) Broach, Joel's great-granddaughter, wrote in a 22 Aug 1978 letter that "Joel Culpepper lived the latter part of his life at his home on the line between Haralson & Meriwether Co. in Ga." This would be Haralson, Coweta Co., GA near the Meriwether Co., GA line where Joel's widow, Nancy, was recorded with her younger children in the 1850 census. However no records have been found to show that Joel was in Coweta Co., GA. The last records that have been found for him are Crawford Co., GA estate records. According to p. 163 of the Crawford Co., GA Guardian Bonds Book A 1830-1842, 8 Jan 1840, Henry Morgan was appointed temporary administrator for Joel Culpepper, deceased. Frances Morgan was listed as security. The bond was $1000. On p. 38 of Crawford Co., GA Inferior Court Minutes 1838-1849, Henry H. Morgan as administrator was granted leave to sell perishable property. Unfortunately, Nancy and her children have not been located in the 1840 census. As noted, the family emerges in Coweta Co., GA in the 1850 census. 
Research note  (an unknown value.)9 

Family

Nancy Corley (circa 1798 - 22 Mar 1860)
Marriage*circa 1820 He married Nancy Corley at Lexington District, South Carolina, circa 1820. 
Children
ChartsHenry Culpeper of Lower Norfolk: DNA Status Chart (Male only, 8 generations)
John Culpepper of Randolph Co, AL: Descendant Chart
Last Edited18 Oct 2008

Citations

  1. 1800 Federal Census, United States.
    Unknown Township, Lexington District, SC
    Joseph Culpepper, page 560, 2 M0-10, 1 M16-26, 1 M26-45, 1 M45+, 1 F0-10, 1 F10-16, 1 F45+
    John Culpepper, page 561, 3 M0-10, 1 M16-26, 1 F0-10, 1 F16-26.
  2. P 173 (John 1m 26-45 w/5m 0-10, 2m 10-16, 1f 0-10, 1f 16-26, 2f 26-45)
    p 173 Nancy (1 of 2 females 26-45 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Joel (1 of 2 males age 10-16 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 John J. (1 of 2 males age 10-16 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Daniel P. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Sarah O. (1 female 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Francis G. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 James I. J. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 George W. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper).
  3. 1810 Federal Census, United States.
    Columbia, Richland District, SC
    John Culpepper, page 173, 5 M0-10, 2 M10-16, 1 M26-45, 1 F0-10, 1 F16-26, 2 F26-45, 16 slaves.
  4. National Archives and Records Administration, compiler, Index to the Compiled Military Service Records for the Volunteer Soldiers Who Served During the War of 1812, Online database at Ancestry.com, 1999.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=4281
  5. Jo B. Gladney and J. L. Henderson Sue Henderson, compiler, Gordon County, GA Cemetery Records, Calhoun, GA: Gordon County Historical Society, 1987, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN 975.8362 V3h.
    West Union Cemetery, Curryville community adjacent to Floyd County line in Gordon Co., GA
    + Charles William Culpepper, 16 Jul 1824 – 8 Jun 1900, Mason
    + Mary Jane English Culpepper, 15 Oct 1830 – 19 Jan 1910.
  6. USGenWeb Archives.
    http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/copyright.htm
    Haralson United Methodist Church Cemetery, Haralson, Coweta Co., GA
    + J. D. Culpepper, 23 Feb 1829 -14 Mar 1892, Mason.
  7. 1830 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 410, Crawford Co., GA
    Joel Culpepper, 1 M0-5, 2 M5-10, 1 M30-40, 1 F0-5, 1 F30-40.
  8. Rev. S. Emmett Lucas Jr., The 1832 Gold Lottery of Georgia, Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1988, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 975.8 R2lb.
    Joel Culpepper, Simmons District, Crawford Co., GA, drew lot 1060/21/2 in either what became Cass (later Bartow) or Cherokee Co., GA, 1832.
  9. National Archives and Records Administration, compiler, Index to the Compiled Military Service Records for the Volunteer Soldiers Who Served During the War of 1812, Online database at Ancestry.com, 1999.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=4281
    South Carolina Militia:
    Joel Culpepper, Austin's Regiment
    Joseph Culpepper, Austin's Regiment
    Richard Culpepper, Austin's Regiment
    Richard Culpepper, Youngblood's Regiment.

Nancy Corley

Female, #32049, (circa 1798 - 22 Mar 1860)
Father*Lawrence Corley (1742 - 15 Dec 1815)
Mother*Anna Barbara Derrick (17 Jun 1770 - a 1820)
Birth*circa 1798 Nancy was born at Orangeburg District, South Carolina, circa 1798. 
1810 Census1810 Nancy was probably a free white female under 10 years of age, in Lawrence Corley's household on the 1810 Census at Lexington District, South Carolina.1 
Death of Father15 Dec 1815 Her father Lawrence Corley died on 15 Dec 1815 at Lexington District, South Carolina
Marriage*circa 1820 She married Joel Culpepper of Crawford Co., GA at Lexington District, South Carolina, circa 1820. 
Married Namecirca 1820  As of circa 1820, her married name was Culpepper. 
Birth of Son13 Jan 1822 Her son John L. Culpepper was born on 13 Jan 1822 at Lexington District, South Carolina
Birth of Son16 Jul 1824 Her son Charles William Culpepper was born on 16 Jul 1824 at Lexington District, South Carolina.2 
Birth of Son23 Feb 1829 Her son James D. Culpepper was born on 23 Feb 1829 at Crawford Co., Georgia.3 
1830 Census1 Jun 1830 Nancy was probably a free white female, age 30 and under 40, in Joel Culpepper of Crawford Co., GA's household, on the 1830 Census at Crawford Co., Georgia.4 
Birth of Son30 Jan 1831 Her son Daniel Culpepper was born on 30 Jan 1831 at Crawford Co., Georgia
Birth of Son31 Dec 1833 Her son Elijah Milton Culpepper was born on 31 Dec 1833 at Crawford Co., Georgia
Death of Spouse6 Dec 1839 Her husband Joel Culpepper of Crawford Co., GA died on 6 Dec 1839 at Crawford Co., Georgia
1850 Census*1 Jun 1850 Nancy was listed as the head of a family on the 1850 Census on 1 Jun 1850 at Coweta Co., Georgia.5 
Will*1860 She made a will at Coweta Co., Georgia, in 1860.

State of Georgia

County of Coweta

In the name of God, Amen. I, Nancy Culpepper of said State and County, being of advanced age, but of sound mind and memory, knowing that I shortly depart this life, deem it right and proper, both as suspects my family and myself, that I should
make a disposition of the property with which a kind Providence has blessed me.

I do, therefore male this my last will and testament, hereby revoking and annulling others by me made.

First: I desire and direct that my body be buried in a decent and Christ like manner. Suitable to my circumstances and condition in life. My soul, I trust shall return to rest with God, who gave it, as I hope for salvation the merits an atonement of the blessed Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ.

Secondly: I give and bequeath to my beloved daughter, Sarah A. Sims, wife of Iverson Sims, for her sole and separate use, for during her life time, free and exempt from the debts and liabilities of the present, or future, husbands. The following property to wit, one Negro girl named Laura, about three years old, and two beds and bedsteads. The property in this article contains at the
death of my daughter, Sarah Sims, pass to and become the property of her children and representatives of children of said Sarah Sims forever.

Thirdly: I desire and direct that all my just debts be paid without delay by my Executors herein after named and appointed.

Fourthly: The residue of my property both real and personal, wherever and Whatever it may be, I desire and direct to be sold and the proceeds be divided between my children (viz) John, Charles, Sarah Sims, wife of Iverson Sims, James and Elizabeth M.

Fifthly: I give and bequeath to Iverson Sims, the present husband of my daughter, Sarah Sims, the promissory note I hold against him for one hundred sixteen dollars with interest, which amount is to be taken from that portion which belongs to Sarah Sims, contained in the fourth article of this will.

Sixthly: I desire and direct that the Executor hereinafter named shall, with the portion given to Sarah Sims, contained in that fourth article of this will, after deductions of the bequest in the fifth article named, purchase a homestead shall be for her sole and separate use, free and exempt from the debts and liabilities of her present or future husbands.

Seventhly: I hereby constitute and appoint my two sons, Charles and James Culpepper, Executors of my estate and of this my last will and testament, this March 21, 1860.

                Her
           Nancy X Culpepper
                Mark

Signed and declared and published by Nancy Culpepper as her last Will and Testament in the presence of us, the undersigned, who subscribe our names hereto in the presence of said Testatrix, at her special instance and in the presence of each other.

               This March 21, 1860

J. P. Taylor
A.     Hancock
William Taylor
R. A. Taylor

Georgia) Coweta Court of Ordinary
Coweta County) Aspic
Term 1860. In open court personally, William Taylor, Alfred Hancock, and Robert Taylor, whom being duly sworn, disposeth and saith that they saw Nancy Culpepper the within named, and testatrix, now deceased, sign said, publish and declare the writing contained on this sheet, to be her last will and testament; and that, at the time, she was of sound mind and disposing memory. 
Death*22 Mar 1860 She died at Coweta Co., Georgia, on 22 Mar 1860. 
Note* Sarah Corley, born c. 1804, SC, was the second wife of Jacob Rawls, Jr. They married in 1838, presumably in SC, as I don't believe they came into Coweta Co., GA, until 1839. Sarah Corley was the daughter of Lawrence Corley and Annie Barbara Derrick, of Lexington, SC. Sarah had 1 child. She died 10 Aug 1849, of apoplexy and is buried in Mt. Pilgrim Lutheran Church Cemetery, Haralson, Coweta Co., GA. Her headstone says right on it "daughter of the late L. Corly of Lexington Co. S.C." Note his name spelled without an "e." Buried right beside her is Elijah H. Corley, died 10 Sept 1851 aged 48 yrs, 1 month, 28 days. This MIGHT be a brother of hers. I've seen, photographed and done a rubbing of Sarah's headstone.

William Taylor's 1st wife, Rebecca Corley, who he married 30 Sept 1819, Lexington Co., SC, was also a daughter of Lawrence Corley and Annie Barbara Derrick, I'm pretty sure. Rebecca was born 4 May 1800, Lexington Co., SC, and she died 4 June 1863, Haralson, Coweta Co., GA. Likewise, she is buried at Mt. Pilgrim Lutheran Church Cemetery, Haralson, GA. Her headstone says she died 4 June 1863 at 63 years, 1 month. She had 10 children.

I have not pursued Lawrence and Annie Barbara Corley. I do have a birthdate for Annie as 17 June 1770 and a deathdate of 15 March 1858. Both Lawrence and Annie were born in SC. Annie was the daughter of Thomas Derrick, I've been told. That's all I know....6 
Biography* Based on later census records, Nancy was born in South Carolina where her father was noted in the 1790 census of Orangeburg District. This would later become Lexington District. Nancy is first noted (apparently, although she would have been 12 years old based on her age in later census records) as one of three females 0 to 10 years of age in the household of her father, Lawrence Corley, in the 1810 census of Lexington District, SC (he has not been found in the 1800 SC census).

Nancy and her husband, Joel, have not been found in the 1820 census of South Carolina or Georgia although based on the birth location or their second child they were in South Carolina and possibly still in Lexington District, SC near her widowed mother. Sometime after their second child was born in 1824, Nancy and Joel moved their young family to Georgia where they are noted in the 1830 census of Crawford County. Since an 1840 estate record for Joel Culpepper has been found in Crawford Co., GA the family is presumed to have been there at least until Joel's death in Dec 1839 even though the family has not been found in the 1840 census.

Nancy was noted in 1844 Meriwether Co., GA deed records. John William Culpepper obtained a copy deed H-281 in which on 9 January 1944 John W. Twitty sold 50 acres of land in the north west corner of land lot 97 in the 9th District of Meriwether County, Georgia to Nancy Culpepper for $275.00. John William notes that "this land is very near Haralson, as a matter of fact, the NW edge of the property is within the Haralson City limits on the Coweta-Meriwether County line.

By 1850, Nancy was living in Coweta Co., GA with her younger children and an older son, Charles William, was living nearby. Another son, John, has been found in the 1850 census of Morgan Co., GA and son Daniel has not been found. Nancy's father-in-law, John Culpepper, mentioned Nancy and her family in an 1853 letter to his son, Francis G. Culpepper: Joel's Widow & family (John in Morgan) are at Haralson Viledge Coweta County.
Nancy's death was recorded in the Family Bible of her daughter, Mrs. I. W. (Sarah A. B. Culpepper) Sims: _________________________Nancy Culpepper _________________________Departed This Lif _________________________March 22 1860
Nancy apparently died in Coweta Co., GA where the following record from the settlement of the estate was found. On the same day that this transaction took place, the land described was purchased by the estate from Paleman J. Reeves for $100:

State of Georgia______An indenture Coweta County_________made, had and entered into this the _______________________twenty fifth day of January A.D. eighteen hundred and Sixty nine between Charles W. Culpepper and James D. Culpepper, Executors of the last will and testament of Nancy Culpepper, deceased, all of the County and State aforesaid of the one part and Iverson W. Sims of the other part, witnesseth that the Said executors in accordance with the previsions of the last will and testament of Mrs Nancy Culpepper, deceased - for and in consideration of the great love which the Said Nancy bore for her daughter, Sarah A. B. Sims wife of Iverson W. Sims of Said County and State, as well as for the consideration of Ten dollars To Them in hand paid by the Said Iverson W. Sims the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged, has granted bargained, Sold, aliend and conveyed: and by these presents do grant, bargain, Sell alien and convey unto the Said Iverson W. Sims his heir and assigne Ten acres of land in the North West Corner of lot of land number Too hundred & ninety, in the first District of said County and State adjoining the lands of Luther W. Hardison and others and near the town of Senoia: To have and to hold the aforesaid granted premises to the Said Iverson W. Sims his heirs and assigns in trust nevertheless, for the Sole and Separate use of the Said Sarah A. B. Sims, wife of Iverson W. Sims, for and during her natural life, and after her death to Such children as She may leave living at the time of her death, Share and Share alike; with power however of the Said Sarah A. B. Sims to empower her trustee by writing under her hand to Sell any part or the whole of Said trust estate, and to reinvest the proceeds in such other property, Subject to the above described trusts, And with power to the Said Sarah A. B. Sims to appoint and choose by writing, under Seal, another trustee instead of the one above mentioned whenever the one above mentioned shall resign his trust or die - or she become dissatisfied with the one herein appointed. And the Said Charles W. and James D. Culpepper, Executors as aforesaid the Said premises to the Said Sarah A. B. Sims or her lawful trustee for ever warrant and defend by virtue of these presents. In witness whereof the Said Charles W. and James D. Culpepper have hereto Set their hands and Seals this January 25th day A.D. 1869 In presence of______________ /s/ Joel J. Herndon__________/s/_C. W. Culpepper___Executors of /s/ J. E. Stallings__________/s/_J. D. Culpepper___Nancy Culpepper. 

Family

Joel Culpepper of Crawford Co., GA (12 Mar 1795 - 6 Dec 1839)
Marriage*circa 1820 She married Joel Culpepper of Crawford Co., GA at Lexington District, South Carolina, circa 1820. 
Children
Last Edited27 Feb 2008

Citations

  1. P 73 Nancy ((1 of 3f 0-10 in hh of Lawrence Corley).
  2. Jo B. Gladney and J. L. Henderson Sue Henderson, compiler, Gordon County, GA Cemetery Records, Calhoun, GA: Gordon County Historical Society, 1987, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN 975.8362 V3h.
    West Union Cemetery, Curryville community adjacent to Floyd County line in Gordon Co., GA
    + Charles William Culpepper, 16 Jul 1824 – 8 Jun 1900, Mason
    + Mary Jane English Culpepper, 15 Oct 1830 – 19 Jan 1910.
  3. USGenWeb Archives.
    http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/copyright.htm
    Haralson United Methodist Church Cemetery, Haralson, Coweta Co., GA
    + J. D. Culpepper, 23 Feb 1829 -14 Mar 1892, Mason.
  4. 1830 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 410, Crawford Co., GA
    Joel Culpepper, 1 M0-5, 2 M5-10, 1 M30-40, 1 F0-5, 1 F30-40.
  5. 1850 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 298B, 19th District, Coweta Co., GA
    Nancy Culpepper, 52, F, $350, SC
    Sarah A. Culpepper, 23, F, GA
    James B. Culpepper, 21, M, Farmer, GA
    Elijah M. Culpepper, 16, M, Farmer, GA.
  6. Ann Cantin, aka Marie Cantlin e-mail address e-mail, June 2001.

Lawrence Corley1

Male, #32050, (1742 - 15 Dec 1815)
Note* Ann Cantin, a. k. a. Marie Cantlin, e-mail June 2001: mcantlin@tampabay.rr.com: Now, to the Corleys. Sarah Corley, born c. 1804, SC, was the second wife of Jacob Rawls, Jr. They married in 1838, presumably in SC, as I don't believe they came into Coweta Co., GA, until 1839. Sarah Corley was the daughter of Lawrence Corley and Annie Barbara Derrick, of Lexington, SC. Sarah had 1 child. She died 10 Aug 1849, of apoplexy and is buried in Mt. Pilgrim Lutheran Church Cemetery, Haralson, Coweta Co., GA. Her headstone says right on it "daughter of the late L. Corly of Lexington Co. S.C." Note his name spelled without an "e." Buried right beside her is Elijah H. Corley, died 10 Sept 1851 aged 48 yrs, 1 month, 28 days. This MIGHT be a brother of hers. I've seen, photographed and done a rubbing of Sarah's headstone.
.
William Taylor's 1st wife, Rebecca Corley, who he married 30 Sept 1819, Lexington Co., SC, was also a daughter of Lawrence Corley and Annie Barbara Derrick, I'm pretty sure. Rebecca was born 4 May 1800, Lexington Co., SC, and she died 4 June 1863, Haralson, Coweta Co., GA. Likewise, she is buried at Mt. Pilgrim Lutheran Church Cemetery, Haralson, GA. Her headstone says she died 4 June 1863 at 63 years, 1 month. She had 10 children.

I have not pursued Lawrence and Annie Barbara Corley. I do have a birthdate for Annie as 17 June 1770 and a deathdate of 15 March 1858. Both Lawrence and Annie were born in SC. Annie was the daughter of Thomas Derrick, I've been told. That's all I know..........
 
Birth*1742 Lawrence was born in 1742. 
American Revolution*between 1775 and 1783 He provided service in the American Revolutionary War between 1775 and 1783
(DAR Listing: Lawrence Corley, born 1742 Ireland, died 18 Dec 1815 in South Carolina, married Christine Blaken, married second, Anna Barbara (Derrick) Drafts, Soldier, South Carolina.)2 
1790 Census*1790 Lawrence was listed as the head of a family on the 1790 Census in 1790 at Orangeburg District, South Carolina.3 
Marriage*circa 1790 He married Anna Barbara Derrick circa 1790. 
1810 Census*1810 Lawrence was listed as the head of a family on the 1810 Census at Lexington District, South Carolina.4 
Death*15 Dec 1815 He died at Lexington District, South Carolina, on 15 Dec 1815. 
Biography* Now, to the Corleys. Sarah Corley, born c. 1804, SC, was the second wife of Jacob Rawls, Jr. They married in 1838, presumably in SC, as I don't believe they came into Coweta Co., GA, until 1839. Sarah Corley was the daughter of Lawrence Corley and Annie Barbara Derrick, of Lexington, SC. Sarah had 1 child. She died 10 Aug 1849, of apoplexy and is buried in Mt. Pilgrim Lutheran Church Cemetery, Haralson, Coweta Co., GA. Her headstone says right on it "daughter of the late L. Corly of Lexington Co. S.C." Note his name spelled without an "e." Buried right beside her is Elijah H. Corley, died 10 Sept 1851 aged 48 yrs, 1 month, 28 days. This MIGHT be a brother of hers. I've seen, photographed and done a rubbing of Sarah's headstone.
.
William Taylor's 1st wife, Rebecca Corley, who he married 30 Sept 1819, Lexington Co., SC, was also a daughter of Lawrence Corley and Annie Barbara Derrick, I'm pretty sure. Rebecca was born 4 May 1800, Lexington Co., SC, and she died 4 June 1863, Haralson, Coweta Co., GA. Likewise, she is buried at Mt. Pilgrim Lutheran Church Cemetery, Haralson, GA. Her headstone says she died 4 June 1863 at 63 years, 1 month. She had 10 children.
.
I have not pursued Lawrence and Annie Barbara Corley. I do have a birthdate for Annie as 17 June 1770 and a deathdate of 15 March 1858. Both Lawrence and Annie were born in SC. Annie was the daughter of Thomas Derrick, I've been told. That's all I know..........
 

Family

Anna Barbara Derrick (17 Jun 1770 - after 1820)
Marriage*circa 1790 He married Anna Barbara Derrick circa 1790. 
Child
Last Edited30 Apr 2012

Citations

  1. E-mail written Jun 2001 to Lew Griffin from Ann (a.k.a. Marie) Cantlin, e-mail address.
  2. DAR Patriot Index, Washington, DC: National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, 2003.
  3. (Anna, 1 of 4 females in hh of Lawrence Corley).
  4. P 73 Nancy ((1 of 3f 0-10 in hh of Lawrence Corley).

Anna Barbara Derrick

Female, #32051, (17 Jun 1770 - after 1820)
Note* Ann Cantin, a. k. a. Marie Cantlin, e-mail June 2001: mcantlin@tampabay.rr.com: Now, to the Corleys. Sarah Corley, born c. 1804, SC, was the second wife of Jacob Rawls, Jr. They married in 1838, presumably in SC, as I don't believe they came into Coweta Co., GA, until 1839. Sarah Corley was the daughter of Lawrence Corley and Annie Barbara Derrick, of Lexington, SC. Sarah had 1 child. She died 10 Aug 1849, of apoplexy and is buried in Mt. Pilgrim Lutheran Church Cemetery, Haralson, Coweta Co., GA. Her headstone says right on it "daughter of the late L. Corly of Lexington Co. S.C." Note his name spelled without an "e." Buried right beside her is Elijah H. Corley, died 10 Sept 1851 aged 48 yrs, 1 month, 28 days. This MIGHT be a brother of hers. I've seen, photographed and done a rubbing of Sarah's headstone.

William Taylor's 1st wife, Rebecca Corley, who he married 30 Sept 1819, Lexington Co., SC, was also a daughter of Lawrence Corley and Annie Barbara Derrick, I'm pretty sure. Rebecca was born 4 May 1800, Lexington Co., SC, and she died 4 June 1863, Haralson, Coweta Co., GA. Likewise, she is buried at Mt. Pilgrim Lutheran Church Cemetery, Haralson, GA. Her headstone says she died 4 June 1863 at 63 years, 1 month. She had 10 children.

I have not pursued Lawrence and Annie Barbara Corley. I do have a birthdate for Annie as 17 June 1770 and a deathdate of 15 March 1858. Both Lawrence and Annie were born in SC. Annie was the daughter of Thomas Derrick, I've been told. That's all I know..........
 
Birth*17 Jun 1770 Anna was born on 17 Jun 1770. 
Marriage*circa 1790 She married Lawrence Corley circa 1790. 
1790 Census*1790 Anna was probably a free white female in Lawrence Corley's household on the 1790 Census in 1790 at Orangeburg District, South Carolina.1 
Married Namecirca 1790  As of circa 1790, her married name was Corley. 
1810 Census*1810 She was enumerated in the US Census of 1810 in 1810 at Lexington District, South Carolina
1820 Census7 Aug 1820 Anna was listed as the head of a family on the 1820 Census at Lexington District, South Carolina
Death*after 1820 She died at Lexington District, South Carolina, after 1820. 
Biography* Mrs. F. D. (Betty Lee Collins) Hale notes that Barbara was the widow of John Drafts. She married Lawrence Corley as his second wife. 

Family

Lawrence Corley (1742 - 15 Dec 1815)
Marriage*circa 1790 She married Lawrence Corley circa 1790. 
Child
Last Edited5 Jul 2004

Citations

  1. (Anna, 1 of 4 females in hh of Lawrence Corley).

Francis Culpepper

Male, #32053, (1 Aug 1796 - 29 Sep 1796)
Father*John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL (1 Oct 1772 - 13 May 1855)
Mother*Nancy Gillespie (c 1778 - 25 Jul 1848)
Birth*1 Aug 1796 Francis was born at Orangeburg District, South Carolina, on 1 Aug 1796. 
Death*29 Sep 1796 He died at Orangeburg District, South Carolina, on 29 Sep 1796. 
Biography* Mrs. J. W. (Ira Gay) Deam of Gay, GA preserved birth record for this child from the John Culpepper Bible and Mrs. D. W. (Lavyn Wright) Sisco transcribed it as follows: __________________________Francis Culpepper __________________________b. August 1 1796 __________________________On Monday at 7 o'clock A.M.
The death was also noted two months later and was preserved by Mrs. Deam and Mrs. Sisco: __________________________d. September 29, 1796
This child was apparently named for Nancy (Gillespie) Culpepper's presumed father, Francis Gillespie. Since the child died as an infant, the name was later used for another child, Francis Gillespie Culpepper who was born in 1804. 
ChartsHenry Culpeper of Lower Norfolk: DNA Status Chart (Male only, 8 generations)
John Culpepper of Randolph Co, AL: Descendant Chart
Last Edited27 Feb 2008

John Jefferson Culpepper

Male, #32054, (4 Nov 1797 - 4 May 1885)
Father*John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL (1 Oct 1772 - 13 May 1855)
Mother*Nancy Gillespie (c 1778 - 25 Jul 1848)
DNA* John has been proven by DNA and genealogical research to be a descendant of Joseph Culpepper of Edgecombe Co., NC, who is a son of Robert Culpepper of Lower Norfolk, the son of Henry Culpepper of Lower Norfolk, VA. 
Birth*4 Nov 1797 John was born at Orangeburg District, South Carolina, on 4 Nov 1797. 
1800 Census4 Aug 1800 Joel, Daniel and John was probably a free white male, under 10 years old, in John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL's houseshold on the 1800 Census at Lexington District, South Carolina. Unaccounted for is 1 female 0-10..1 
1810 Census6 Aug 1810 John and Joel was probably a free white male, age 10 and under 16, in John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL's household on the 1810 Census at Richland District, South Carolina. Unaccounted for are 1 male 0-10 and 1 female 16-26..2,3 
Tax roll*between 1822 and 1824 He registered to pay taxes at Baldwin Co., Georgia, between 1822 and 1824.4 
Marriage*before 1826 He married Catherine Bell at Edgefield District, South Carolina, before 1826.5 
Deed*Jan 1826 He granted a deed, with Barbary Bell as a previous landowner in Jan 1826 at Edgefield District, South Carolina,

John Culpepper, Catherine Culpepper, William Bell, Robert Bell, Margaret Bell & Mary Bell, for $651, 144 acres to William H. Buffington, a tract where Barbary Bell formerly lived, as granted to George Shelnut, on Cuffeetown Creek bordering Josiah Langley’s Mill, Elijah Harding, Benjamin Hasting, George McDuffy. Witnesses: Hugh Mosely, Henry Shelnut. Catherine Culpepper, Mary Ann Bell give consent.6 
1830 Census*1 Jun 1830 John was listed as the head of a family on the 1830 Census at Upson Co., Georgia. Unaccounted for is 1 Male 5-10..7 
Birth of Son2 Jul 1830 His son Robert Jefferson Culpepper was born on 2 Jul 1830 at Upson Co., Georgia.8 
Land Lottery*1832 He had a fortunate draw in the land lottery in 1832 at Upson Co., Georgia,
lot 380/19/3 in what became Paulding Co., GA.9 
Birth of Son14 Aug 1834 His son William Washington Culpepper was born on 14 Aug 1834 at Upson Co., Georgia.10 
1840 Census*1 Jun 1840 John was listed as the head of a family on the 1840 Census on 1 Jun 1840 at Chambers Co., Alabama.11 
Death of Mother25 Jul 1848 His mother Nancy Gillespie died on 25 Jul 1848 at Meriwether Co., Georgia
1850 Census*1 Jun 1850 John was listed as the head of a family on the 1850 Census on 1 Jun 1850 at Chambers Co., Alabama.12 
Photographed*say 1855 He was photographed say 1855 at Randolph Co., Alabama,
This photo was provided by Mary Lillian Butler Pierce (1915-2000) of Albertville, and later of Huntsville, AL. The owner or location of the original is unknown. Mrs. Billy Wendell Dunn (Marina Sylvia Hiscock) of Arab, AL, may have more information.
John Jefferson Culpepper
Death of Father13 May 1855 His father John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL died on 13 May 1855 at Randolph Co., Alabama
1860 Census*1 Jun 1860 John was listed as the head of a family on the 1860 Census at Almond, Randolph Co., Alabama.13 
Death of Spousecirca 1865 His wife Catherine Bell died circa 1865 at Almond, Randolph Co., Alabama
Birth of SonMay 1866 His son Simon L. Culpepper was born in May 1866 at Alabama
Birth of Son25 May 1870 His son David J. Culpepper was born on 25 May 1870 at Alabama.14 
1870 Census*1 Jun 1870 John was listed as the head of a family on the 1870 Census at Louina, Randolph Co., Alabama.15 
1880 Census*1 Jun 1880 John was listed as the head of a family on the 1880 Census at Flat Rock, Randolph Co., Alabama.16 
Death*4 May 1885 He died at Randolph Co., Alabama, on 4 May 1885 at age 87. 
Burial*circa 5 May 1885 His body was interred circa 5 May 1885 at Concord Baptist Cemetery, Randolph Co., Alabama
Biography* Mrs. J. W. (Ira Gay) Deam of Gay, GA preserved John Jefferson Culpepper's birth data from John Culpepper, Senior's Bible and Mrs. D. W. (Lavyn Wright) Sisco transcribed the information as follows: _________________________John J. Culpepper _________________________b. November 4, 1797 _________________________On Saturday at 10 o'clock A.M.
     John Jefferson's parents are believed to have been living in Orangeburg District, SC at the time of his birth in an area which was designated Lexington District in the 1800 census and which later became Lexington Co., SC. In the 1800 census, John Jefferson's father, John Culpepper, was listed as a head of household with his young family, including, John Jefferson Culpepper, in Lexington District, SC. By 1810, John Jefferson's parents had moved the family back across the Congaree River to Richland District, SC. Possibly this took place in 1807 when John Jefferson's father, John was made an administrator of Daniel Peek's estate. John Jefferson was recorded with his parents in the 1810 census of Richland District, SC. Some time after this census, John Jefferson would have moved with his parents to Edgefield District, SC which shared a portion of its eastern border with Lexington District, SC.
     Although no record has been found, John Jefferson Culpepper is believed to have married Catherine Bell by 1816 in Edgefield District, SC where their parents owned land. A son, born circa 1817, gave his place of birth as Georgia in the 1850 census. Although it is possible that the couple moved to Georgia and returned by 1820 when their next child was born, it is more likely that the son, who was not living near his parents at the time of the 1850 census, simply knew that he had grown up in Georgia and said that he had been born there. Unfortunately, neither John Jefferson nor his father, John Culpepper, has been located as a head of household in the 1820 census of South Carolina or Georgia. However, since John Culpepper, Senior was granted land in Edgefield District, SC in 1814 and he sold land there in 1823, the family is presumed to have still been in South Carolina in 1820 and it is possible that John Jefferson and Catherine were still in Edgefield District, SC in 1820 as well, living near Catherine's widowed mother, Barbary Bell, but overlooked in the census.
     John Jefferson's father, John Culpepper, is known to have moved his family to Georgia when son, Lewis P. Culpepper, was about seven years old meaning that the family probably moved in the Fall of 1823. John Jefferson and Catherine (Bell) Culpepper presumably moved their young family to Georgia about this same time although when Barbary Bell, Catherine (Bell) Culpepper's mother, died in 1826, John Jefferson and his wife apparently returned to South Carolina to settle the estate.
     A land lottery was held in Georgia in 1827. In order to take part in the lottery, John J. Culpepper would have to have been in Georgia for at least three years, i.e., at least since April 1824. As a married man and a citizen of the United States and who had lived in Georgia for three years, John Jefferson would have been eligible for two draws in the lottery. According to Land Lottery Register No. 11 published by Grantland & Orme, on April 2, 1827 "John J. Culpepper" from Captain Turner's District, Monroe Co., GA drew lot #230 which was 202 ½ acres in District 5 of Section 1, Lee Co., GA. The land was in Randolph County, GA when John sold it: "JOHN J. CULPEPPER of Upson Co. to REUBEN BYNAM of Randolph Co. Lot #230, 5th
Dist. Wit.: Eldridge Glabonip, William Caper, J.P." (Randolph Co. GA Deeds)
     John moved to Upson Co., GA where he is found in a 27 Feb 1829 land record (A 434/5) deeding the Lee County land to his father, John Culpepper, for $5.00: Georgia_______This Indenture made the 29th day of February Upson County__in the year of our Lord one Thousand eight hundred and Twenty nine between John J. Culpepper of the State and County aforesaid of the one part and John Culpepper of the State aforesaid and county of Monroe of the other part. Witness that the said John J. Culpepper for and in consideration of the sum of five dollars to him in hand paid at and before the sealing and delivery of these presents the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged - and also for the better securing the said John Culpepper against the payment of several promisory notes made payable to Benjamin Richardson by the Said John J. Culpepper for thirty Dollars Each dated on the sixth day of May eighteen hundred and Twenty Eight and due Six months after date for thirty Dollars each and if not punctually paid interest from date and to which Said notes the Said John Culpepper is security with the Said John J. Culpepper. And also for the better Securing the Said John Culpepper the payment of a promisory note given to him by the Said John J. Culpepper for the Sum of twenty five dollars having even[?] date with these presents and due one day after date hath bargained sold conveyed and confirmed to the Said John Culpepper his heirs Executors administrators and assigns the following real and personal property that is to say Lot Number two hundred and thirty in the fiftheth[?] district of Lee County Containing two hundred two and a half acres more or Less and Drawn by the Said John J. Culpepper in the last land Lottery of this State To have and to hold the Said bargained premises to him the Said John Culpepper his heirs Executors administrators and assigns to his and their own proper also[?] and beproof with all and singular the members rights and appertinances thereof in fee simple. And the Said John J. Culpepper states[?] his heirs and assigns will warrant and defend the right title and possession of the Said Lot tract or parcel of Land to him the Said John Culpepper for and in consideration as aforesaid has this day bargained and Sold to the Said John C. Culpepper [this is the only document which has been found which assigns a middle initial to John Culpepper, Senior. Apparently the clerk was trying to distinguish John Culpepper, Sr. from John J. Culpepper and, since John Culpepper was living in another county, perhaps did not realize that he was John J. Culpepper's father and therefore, John Culpepper, Sr. Since John Culpepper, Senior was literate and at least two copies of his signature are known to exist, it is unlikely that the "C" was his mark. If the middle initial was "C." the name was not passed on to any of his sons although there was a grandson and a great-grandson named Charles William Culpepper. There was a John Cowan Culpepper, a son of Sampson Culpepper, but he is believed to have been living in Laurens Co., GA at this time and he had no known connection to John Jefferson Culpepper] the following Personal property to wit, one brown mare colt about Two years old, one bay mare colt about three years old, five cows & Calves now in the possession of the Said John C. Culpepper and the yearlings also five Sows & Pigs in the possession of the Said John C. Culpepper together with all and every part of the said income of the income Mentioned [aforementioned?] Stock of Cattle horses and hogs and the Said John J. Culpepper will warrant and forever defend the right and title of the Said personal property to him the Said John Culpepper his heirs and assigns. Now the foregoing Indenture is upon the following condition and it is expressly understood between the Said John J Culpepper and the Said John Culpepper that if the Said John J Shall at all times hereafter hold the Said John harmless against the payment of the three notes here in before mentioned given to the Said Benjamin and against the payment of any part thereof and Shall also well and truly pay to the Said John the note given to him for twenty five Dollars and here in before mentioned according to the tenor of Said state together with all lawful interest accruing thereon then the above indenture and all rights and benefits arising therefrom to be utterly null and void as though the same had never been made otherwise to remain in full force and virtue. In Witness whereof the Said John J. Culpepper has hereunto Set his hand and affixed his Seal the day and year first above written. Signed sealed and delivered in the presence of ______his Thomas X Bulman__________________John J. Culpepper [seal] ______mark John Gardner J.P. ________________________Recorded this 12th May 1829
     "John J. Culpepper" was listed in the 1830 Upson Co., GA census with his wife and 1 male 10-15 years of age, 1 male 15-20 years of age, and 1 female 10-15 years of age. The older boy has not been identified. If a son, then John Jefferson and Catherine (Bell) Culpepper would have to have married when they were 11-16 years of age and the son has not been identified in later census records. But the age would also match that of John Jefferson Culpepper's younger brother, William Henry Culpepper, who has not been found in the 1830 census and who married in 1831 in Upson Co., GA.
     As a fortunate drawer in the 1827 lottery, it is not clear that John Jefferson Culpepper was eligible for the 1832 Gold Lottery unless for some reason he was considered NOT to have "taken out a grant for said land lot." In any event "John J. Culpepper" won Gold Lot 380 in district 19 of section 3. This would have been a 40 acre lot near the lower center border of Paulding Co., GA. It is not known if John Jefferson ever mined his Paulding Co., GA land or if he sold it but by 1840 he had moved on to Chambers Co., AL. Possibly the family moved in 1835 or 1836 along with John J. Culpepper's brothers, Francis and James. Or perhaps the family moved in 1837 after the marriage of John Jefferson's son, John J. Culpepper. The elder John J. Culpepper was listed in the 1840 census of Chambers Co., AL. One male and one female 40-50 were recorded, presumably John and his wife, Catherine. Two males 5-10 and one female 15-20 were listed in the household, presumably the three younger children, Robert, William and Elizabeth. The "John J. Culpepper" recorded in the 1840 census of Upson Co., GA (1m 0-5 1m 20-30 1f 15-20), was a son of John Jefferson and Catherine (Bell) Culpepper who was born approximately 1817, who married Elizabeth Stallings in 1837, and who would have had a son, Lewis L. Culpepper, who would have been approximately two years old in 1840. The John Jefferson Culpepper family remained in Chambers Co., AL at least until 1850 when John Culpepper was listed as a farmer in the 1850 Chambers Co., AL census with his wife, Catherine, and son, William. Their daughter, Elizabeth, who had married Robert Johnson, was living next door.
     In the 1850 census, John Jefferson Culpepper was listed as having real estate valued at $300. However, 22 Aug 1850 "John J. Culpepper" bought or was granted 139 46/100 acres of land (Certificate or Warrant 68.157) in the South East part of Section 3 of Township 22 South, Range 10 East of Randolph Co., AL. This land appears to be to the northwest of what is now Wadley and southeast of Almond. The land appears to be split from the southeast corner to the northwest corner by route 77. Presumably, John Jefferson Culpepper moved with his wife and youngest sons to Randolph Co., AL about this time. However, the second marriage of William Washington Culpepper, John Jefferson and Catherine (Bell) Culpepper's youngest son, took place in Chambers Co., AL Dec 1855 at the home of William's brother, Robert J. Culpepper, and John Jefferson Culpepper was a bondsman. Possibly, since John Jefferson lived close to the Chambers Co., AL border, he just went back for the occasion. In 1860, John J. Culpepper was listed with his wife, Catherine, and grandson, John J. Culpepper, at Almond P. O. near Louina (now Wadley), Randolph Co., AL. John J. Culpepper was listed in the 1870 census of Louina P. O. (now Wadley) Randolph Co., AL. John was living near the families of his two sons, Robert and William and a grandson, John Jr. According to p. 112 of Historical Records of Randolph County, Alabama 1832-1900 from the 12 Feb 1875 issue of the Randolph Enterprise the following had their land sold for taxes: On March 1, 1875 the property belonging to the following named persons was to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder from the Court House in Wedowee... BEAT VIII _____Township 21, Range 10... John J. Culpepper... W. W. Culpepper....
     John Jefferson Culpepper would have been 77 years old when he lost this land which was north of the land he purchased or was granted in 1850 and John Jefferson apparently still owned land nearby since he was noted in the 1880 census of Randolph Co., AL. John William Culpepper wrote in an 18 Aug 1994 letter that Mrs. John (Edith Champion) Zuber, a great-great granddaughter of John Jefferson Culpepper, told him that John Jefferson Culpepper lived on the land which Mrs. Zuber's mother's sold in 1950.
      John William Culpepper wrote 18 Aug 1994 that he had located Mrs. John (Edith Champion) Zuber, a great-great-granddaughter of John Jefferson Culpepper. John William believes that the land that Edith's mother, Mrs. M. A. (Inez Culpepper) Champion, sold in 1950 was the land that had originally belonged to John Jefferson Culpepper's father, John Culpepper. The land appears to have been a 58.84 acre lot which was noted as Fraction C of section 14 in Township 22 Range 10 of Randolph Co., AL. The land is south of Wadley on the Chambers County line and Route 22 crosses diagonally through the bottom half of the land. It was originally granted to William Culpepper 21 Feb 1850. Mrs. Champion's grandfather, William Washington Culpepper, a son of John Jefferson Culpepper, would have been only 15 years old at that date so it is assumed that William Henry Culpepper, John Jefferson Culpepper's brother, was granted the land. John Culpepper, Sr. is known from census records to have been living near present day Wadley in 1850 and an extant letter from him to a son, Francis G. Culpepper, indicates that he owned land in the area but only his sons show up in land records. Since John Culpepper, Sr. had "broken up housekeeping" by 1853, it is assumed that he was living on one of the parcels that was in the name of one of his sons. John William wrote of a visit to Mrs. Champion's former property: You will see that rt. 22 leaves Wadley in a Southwesternly direction. The home of current residents, Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Edge, is approximately 3/4 of a mile from Wadley, on Rt. 22 [near the Chambers Co., AL line]. I don't know how far east the property extends [it appears to extend to a point where a secondary road branches south to Chambers Co., AL], but I believe it extends north to Hutton Creek [it appears to cover about 2/3 of the distance from the Chambers Co., AL border to Hutton Creek].... Mrs. John Zuber, (Edith Champion Zuber) daughter of Inez Culpepper Champion [Mrs. M. A. Champion], daughter of Robert Benjamin Culpepper, son of William Washington Culpepper, son of John Jefferson Culpepper advises that her mother sold the property to Mrs. Edge's father in the 1950's.... She said that John Jefferson Culpepper lived at the place with his wife and two sons and remained there after their sons moved to Sand Mountain [Marshall Co., AL]. John and his wife are buried at the Concord Baptist Church Cemetery, located half way between Wadley and Roanoke, Alabama [John Jefferson Culpepper and his wife, Catherine, are not listed in an index to Concord Church Cemetery records possibly because the graves were unmarked or because the markings can no longer be read].... Mrs. Zuber stated that her mother lived at the home place until her husband died and a few years after but found it too much work and moved. It was after she moved that the house on Rt. 22 burned to the ground.
     In a 3 May 1994 letter, John William Culpepper wrote of attempting to locate the location of the house: We located the owner of the property and his wife a Mr. J. T. Edge and his wife Marian.... J. T. Edge took up back of his home over a hill and a short way down the other side of a dirt road where a house used to be. We found the well and a few cedar trees but no visible ground parks of a home. This was the location site mentioned by a lady they talked with who identified the Edge Place as being the former Culpepper property and residence of John and Nancy [Nancy appears to have died in Georgia before John came to Alabama]. We noticed that about 150 yards east of the Edge house, which fronts on State route 22, there stands two tall rock chimneys approximately 45 to 50 feet apart. He took us to the site and said the log house was large with a dog trot in the middle and when they came here there were people still living in the house. He said a nearby well which was covered with branches is 90 feet deep. The Edge house is the location of the original house but a few feet further back from the semi circular drive. The original house burned and scorched the nearby trees which he said were planted by Charles Culpepper the botanist who moved to the Washington area. The old road used to go between the inside of the drive and the current road, Rt. 22. Facing the Edge home on the left of the house but on the other side of the old road was a carriage shop and on the east side of the drive was a blacksmith shop. Mr. Edge said the property was a Culpepper land grant....
     Mrs. Deam and Mrs. Sisco preserved the Bible record of John Jefferson Culpepper's death: _________________________d. May 4, 1885
     The Concord Baptist Church cemetery is about 3 ½ miles east of where John Jefferson Culpepper was living, on Route 22, on the opposite side of the Tallapoosa River. It is on the same side of the river as the now defunct town of Louina which was replaced about 1900 as a population center by Wadley on the opposite of the river. Is it possible that this is also where John Culpepper was buried? 

Family 1

Catherine Bell (circa 1797 - circa 1865)
Marriage*before 1826 He married Catherine Bell at Edgefield District, South Carolina, before 1826.5 
Children

Family 2

Eliza Staples (Mar 1850 - )
Children
ChartsHenry Culpeper of Lower Norfolk: DNA Status Chart (Male only, 8 generations)
John Culpepper of Randolph Co, AL: Descendant Chart
Last Edited8 Mar 2010

Citations

  1. 1800 Federal Census, United States.
    Unknown Township, Lexington District, SC
    Joseph Culpepper, page 560, 2 M0-10, 1 M16-26, 1 M26-45, 1 M45+, 1 F0-10, 1 F10-16, 1 F45+
    John Culpepper, page 561, 3 M0-10, 1 M16-26, 1 F0-10, 1 F16-26.
  2. P 173 (John 1m 26-45 w/5m 0-10, 2m 10-16, 1f 0-10, 1f 16-26, 2f 26-45)
    p 173 Nancy (1 of 2 females 26-45 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Joel (1 of 2 males age 10-16 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 John J. (1 of 2 males age 10-16 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Daniel P. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Sarah O. (1 female 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Francis G. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 James I. J. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 George W. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper).
  3. 1810 Federal Census, United States.
    Columbia, Richland District, SC
    John Culpepper, page 173, 5 M0-10, 2 M10-16, 1 M26-45, 1 F0-10, 1 F16-26, 2 F26-45, 16 slaves.
  4. 1822: John J. Culpepper, Baldwin Co. Tax Digest, Capt. McCrary's Dist.
    1823: John J. Culpepper, Baldwin Co. Tax Digest, Capt. McGehee's Dist.
    Oct 1824: John Culpepper, On list of letters in Milledgeville Post Office.
  5. Lewis W. Griffin Jr. (#47), Phoenix, AZ, e-mail address.
    See Jan 1826 deed listed under Robert Bell.
  6. Edgefield Co. SC Deeds abstracted by Lew Griffin , Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 975.737 R2.
    Edgefield Deed Bk 45, p. 30.
  7. 1830 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 110, Unk Twp, Upson Co., GA
    John J. Culpepper, 1 M5-10, 1 M10-15, 1 M30-40, 1 F10-15, 1 F30-40.
  8. Anna Cochran Gregath, compiler, Cullman County Churches and Cemeteries, Cullman, Alabama: Cullman County Commission, 198_, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN 976.173 K2c.
    Vol 2, pages 15-16:
    Corinth East Baptist Church Cemetery, Cullman Co., Alabama. From I-65, Exit 312, proceed east on AL-157 to AL-69. Turn right on AL-69 and proceed north for 21 miles to AL-67. Continue on AL-69 for one more mile and Corinth Church will be on the right (South)
    + R. J. Culpepper, 2 Jul 1830 - 10 Dec 1919, CSA 1861-1865
    + Lourainey Culpepper, 8 Jun 1833 - 2 Jan 1894.
  9. Rev. S. Emmett Lucas Jr., The 1832 Gold Lottery of Georgia, Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1988, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 975.8 R2lb.
    John J. Culpepper, 588 District, Upson Co., GA, drew lot 380/19/3 in what became Paulding Co., GA, 1832.
  10. USGenWeb Archives.
    http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/copyright.htm
    Mount Vernon Missionary Baptist Church, Marshall Co., AL
    + W. W. Culpepper, 14 Aug 1834 - 2 Mar 1918, Pvt Co B 37 Ala Inf CSA
    + Aunt Fereby Culpepper, 11 Aug 1834 - 18 Nov 1911.
  11. 1840 Federal Census, United States.
    Page ??, Lew Griffin Transcription, Chambers Co., AL.
    John J. Culpepper, 2 M5-10, 1 M40-50, 1 F15-20, 1 F40-50.
  12. 1850 Federal Census, United States.
    District 19 and A Half, Chambers Co., Alabama; Roll M432_2; Page 413B; Image 825.
    John Culpepper, 53, M, Farmer, RE=$500, SC
    Catherine Culpepper, 53, F, SC
    William Culpeppert, 15, M, GA.
  13. 1860 Federal Census, United States.
    Southern Division, Randolph Co., Alabama; Roll M653_22; Page 844; Image 450; Family History Library Film: 803022.
    John Culpepper, 63, M, Farming, RE=$1400, PE=$800, SC
    Catherine Culpepper, 65, F, Housewife, SC
    John J. Culpeppert, 6, M, AL.
  14. U.S. Social Security Administration, compiler, Social Security Death Index (SSDI), Online database at Ancestry.com.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/vital/ssdi/main.htm
  15. 1870 Federal Census, United States.
    Township 22, Randolph Co., Alabama; Rol M593_37; Page 572A; Image 692; Family History Library Film 545536.
    John J. Culpepper, 72, M, Wh, Farmer, RE=$1000, PE=$800, SC
    John J. Culpepper, 16, M, Wh, Farmer, AL
    Simon L. Culpepper, 3, M, Mulatto, AL.
  16. 1880 Federal Census, United States.
    Flat Rock, Page 314B, Randolph Co., AL
    John Culpepper, Self, M, W, Wh, 82, SC, Farmer, Fa: SC, Mo: SC
    Simon L. Culpepper, Son, M, S, MU, 12, AL, Works On Farm, Fa: SC, Mo: AL
    David J. Culpepper, Son, M, S, MU, 10, AL, Works On Farm, Fa: SC, Mo: AL.

Catherine Bell

Female, #32055, (circa 1797 - circa 1865)
Father*Robert Bell (c 1765 - b 1820)
Mother*Barbary (?) (c 1765 - c 1825)
Birth*circa 1797 Catherine was born at South Carolina circa 1797. 
Birth of Soncirca 1817 Her son John J. Culpepper of Jackson Co., FL was born circa 1817 at Edgefield District, South Carolina.1 
Death of Mothercirca 1825 Her mother Barbary (?) died circa 1825 at Edgefield District, South Carolina
Marriage*before 1826 She married John Jefferson Culpepper at Edgefield District, South Carolina, before 1826.2 
Married Namebefore 1826  As of before 1826, her married name was Culpepper. 
Deed*Jan 1826 She granted a deed, with Barbary Bell as a previous landowner in Jan 1826 at Edgefield District, South Carolina,

John Culpepper, Catherine Culpepper, William Bell, Robert Bell, Margaret Bell & Mary Bell, for $651, 144 acres to William H. Buffington, a tract where Barbary Bell formerly lived, as granted to George Shelnut, on Cuffeetown Creek bordering Josiah Langley’s Mill, Elijah Harding, Benjamin Hasting, George McDuffy. Witnesses: Hugh Mosely, Henry Shelnut. Catherine Culpepper, Mary Ann Bell give consent.3 
1830 Census1 Jun 1830 Catherine was probably a free white female, age 30 and under 40, in John Jefferson Culpepper's household, on the 1830 Census at Upson Co., Georgia. Unaccounted for is 1 Male 5-10..4 
Birth of Son2 Jul 1830 Her son Robert Jefferson Culpepper was born on 2 Jul 1830 at Upson Co., Georgia.5 
Birth of Son14 Aug 1834 Her son William Washington Culpepper was born on 14 Aug 1834 at Upson Co., Georgia.6 
1840 Census1 Jun 1840 Catherine was probably a free white female, age 40 and under 50, in John Jefferson Culpepper's household, on the 1840 Census on 1 Jun 1840 at Chambers Co., Alabama.7 
1850 Census1 Jun 1850 Catherine and William listed as a household member living with John Jefferson Culpepper on the 1850 Census on 1 Jun 1850 at Chambers Co., Alabama.8 
1860 Census1 Jun 1860 Catherine and John listed as a household member living with John Jefferson Culpepper in the 1860 Census at Almond, Randolph Co., Alabama.9 
Death*circa 1865 She died at Almond, Randolph Co., Alabama, circa 1865. 
Burial*circa 1865 Her body was interred circa 1865 at Concord Baptist Cemetery, Randolph Co., Alabama
Biography* According to census records, Catherine was born in South Carolina. Her mother, Barbary, was recorded in the 1820 census of Edgefield District, SC and this is where Catherine is believed to have married John Jefferson Culpepper. Barbary Bell died sometime after the 1820 census and before Jan 1826 when "Catharine Culpepper" and her husband, "John J. Culpepper" were listed in a 13 Jan 1826 Edgefield District, SC deed with Wm. Bell, Robert Bell, Margaret Bell and Mary Bell as heirs of Barbary Bell. The land mentioned in the deed was on Cuffeeton Creek by Josiah Langley's Mill bounding Elijah Harding, Benjamin Hasting and Geo. McDuffie's land, and had originally been granted to Geo. Shelnut and was very close if not adjacent to the land that John Culpepper, Senior sold in 1823. The heirs of Barbary Bell granted the land to Wm. H. Buffington for $651. Hugh Mosely and Henry Shelnut were witnesses and releases were signed by Catherine Culpepper wife of John J. Culpepper and Mary Ann Bell wife of William Bell on 13 Jan 1826. The deed was recorded 22 Nov 1830. Catherine and John J. Culpepper presumably returned from Georgia to settle the estate since based on 1827 Georgia Land Lottery records, John J. Culpepper, was supposed to have been in Georgia since 1824.
      Catherine was recorded with her husband and children in the 1830 census of Upson Co., GA and the 1840 and 1850 Chambers Co., AL census. And Catherine was noted in the 1860 census of Almond P. O. District, near Louina (now Wadley), Randolph Co., AL with her husband and grandson. She was not noted in the 1870 census and is presumed to have died in the interim in Randolph Co., AL.
      John William Culpepper wrote 18 Aug 1994 that a descendant, Mrs. John (Edith Champion) Zuber, said that Catherine was buried with her husband in the Concord Baptist Church Cemetery. The grave was not recorded in the index of church cemetery records possibly because the grave was unmarked or is too worn to read. 

Family 1

Children

Family 2

John Jefferson Culpepper (4 Nov 1797 - 4 May 1885)
Marriage*before 1826 She married John Jefferson Culpepper at Edgefield District, South Carolina, before 1826.2 
Children
Last Edited8 Mar 2010

Citations

  1. 1850 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 172B, District 68, Pike Co., GA
    John J. Culpepper, 33, M, Mechanic, GA
    Elizabeth Culpepper, 30, F, GA
    Lewis L. Culpepper, 12, M, GA
    John W.. Culpepper, 10, M, GA
    Robert J. Culpepper, 8, M, GA
    Benjamin F. Culpepper, 6, M, AL
    Cass Culpepper, 1, F, GA.
  2. Lewis W. Griffin Jr. (#47), Phoenix, AZ, e-mail address.
    See Jan 1826 deed listed under Robert Bell.
  3. Edgefield Co. SC Deeds abstracted by Lew Griffin , Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 975.737 R2.
    Edgefield Deed Bk 45, p. 30.
  4. 1830 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 110, Unk Twp, Upson Co., GA
    John J. Culpepper, 1 M5-10, 1 M10-15, 1 M30-40, 1 F10-15, 1 F30-40.
  5. Anna Cochran Gregath, compiler, Cullman County Churches and Cemeteries, Cullman, Alabama: Cullman County Commission, 198_, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN 976.173 K2c.
    Vol 2, pages 15-16:
    Corinth East Baptist Church Cemetery, Cullman Co., Alabama. From I-65, Exit 312, proceed east on AL-157 to AL-69. Turn right on AL-69 and proceed north for 21 miles to AL-67. Continue on AL-69 for one more mile and Corinth Church will be on the right (South)
    + R. J. Culpepper, 2 Jul 1830 - 10 Dec 1919, CSA 1861-1865
    + Lourainey Culpepper, 8 Jun 1833 - 2 Jan 1894.
  6. USGenWeb Archives.
    http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/copyright.htm
    Mount Vernon Missionary Baptist Church, Marshall Co., AL
    + W. W. Culpepper, 14 Aug 1834 - 2 Mar 1918, Pvt Co B 37 Ala Inf CSA
    + Aunt Fereby Culpepper, 11 Aug 1834 - 18 Nov 1911.
  7. 1840 Federal Census, United States.
    Page ??, Lew Griffin Transcription, Chambers Co., AL.
    John J. Culpepper, 2 M5-10, 1 M40-50, 1 F15-20, 1 F40-50.
  8. 1850 Federal Census, United States.
    District 19 and A Half, Chambers Co., Alabama; Roll M432_2; Page 413B; Image 825.
    John Culpepper, 53, M, Farmer, RE=$500, SC
    Catherine Culpepper, 53, F, SC
    William Culpeppert, 15, M, GA.
  9. 1860 Federal Census, United States.
    Southern Division, Randolph Co., Alabama; Roll M653_22; Page 844; Image 450; Family History Library Film: 803022.
    John Culpepper, 63, M, Farming, RE=$1400, PE=$800, SC
    Catherine Culpepper, 65, F, Housewife, SC
    John J. Culpeppert, 6, M, AL.

Robert Bell

Male, #32056, (circa 1765 - before 1820)
Birth*circa 1765 Robert was born circa 1765. 
Marriage*circa 1785 He married Barbary (?) circa 1785. 
Death*before 1820 He died at Edgefield District, South Carolina, before 1820. 
DeedFeb 1823 He was an adjacent landowner in the deed granted by John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL and Nancy Gillespie in Feb 1823 at Edgefield District, South Carolina,

John Culpepper to Josiah Langley Sr. for $800, the tract “where I live” as granted to George Shelnut, 144 acres on Cuffeetown Creek and waters of Stephens Creek and Savannah River, adjoining said Josiah Langley and the heirs of Robert Bell. Witnesses: James Harrison, Mathew Rhodes. Nancy Culpepper gives consent.1 
DeedJan 1826 He granted a deed, with Barbary Bell as a previous landowner in Jan 1826 at Edgefield District, South Carolina,

John Culpepper, Catherine Culpepper, William Bell, Robert Bell, Margaret Bell & Mary Bell, for $651, 144 acres to William H. Buffington, a tract where Barbary Bell formerly lived, as granted to George Shelnut, on Cuffeetown Creek bordering Josiah Langley’s Mill, Elijah Harding, Benjamin Hasting, George McDuffy. Witnesses: Hugh Mosely, Henry Shelnut. Catherine Culpepper, Mary Ann Bell give consent.2 

Family

Barbary (?) (circa 1765 - circa 1825)
Child
Last Edited5 Jul 2004

Citations

  1. Edgefield Co. SC Deeds abstracted by Lew Griffin , Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 975.737 R2.
    Edgefield Deed Bk 43, p. 322.
  2. Edgefield Co. SC Deeds abstracted by Lew Griffin , Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 975.737 R2.
    Edgefield Deed Bk 45, p. 30.

Barbary (?)

Female, #32057, (circa 1765 - circa 1825)
Birth*circa 1765 Barbary was born circa 1765. 
Marriage*circa 1785 She married Robert Bell circa 1785. 
Married Namecirca 1785  As of circa 1785, her married name was Bell. 
Death*circa 1825 She died at Edgefield District, South Carolina, circa 1825. 
DeedJan 1826 She was a previous land owner in a deed granted by John Jefferson Culpepper, Catherine Bell and Robert Bell in Jan 1826 at Edgefield District, South Carolina,

John Culpepper, Catherine Culpepper, William Bell, Robert Bell, Margaret Bell & Mary Bell, for $651, 144 acres to William H. Buffington, a tract where Barbary Bell formerly lived, as granted to George Shelnut, on Cuffeetown Creek bordering Josiah Langley’s Mill, Elijah Harding, Benjamin Hasting, George McDuffy. Witnesses: Hugh Mosely, Henry Shelnut. Catherine Culpepper, Mary Ann Bell give consent.1 

Family

Robert Bell (circa 1765 - before 1820)
Child
Last Edited5 Jul 2004

Citations

  1. Edgefield Co. SC Deeds abstracted by Lew Griffin , Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 975.737 R2.
    Edgefield Deed Bk 45, p. 30.

Daniel Peek Culpepper

Male, #32058, (23 Apr 1800 - 25 Oct 1825)
Father*John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL (1 Oct 1772 - 13 May 1855)
Mother*Nancy Gillespie (c 1778 - 25 Jul 1848)
DNA To help confirm Daniel Peek Culpepper's descent from Henry Culpepper of Lower Norfolk, we are seeking a male Culpepper descendant of Daniel's to participate in our free DNA testing project. For more information, go to: http://gen.culpepper.com/dna
Birth*23 Apr 1800 Daniel was born at Lexington District, South Carolina, on 23 Apr 1800. 
1800 Census4 Aug 1800 Joel, Daniel and John was probably a free white male, under 10 years old, in John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL's houseshold on the 1800 Census at Lexington District, South Carolina. Unaccounted for is 1 female 0-10..1 
1810 Census6 Aug 1810 Daniel, Francis, James and George was probably a free white male, age under 10, in John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL's household on the 1810 Census at Richland District, South Carolina. Unaccounted for are 1 male 0-10 and 1 female 16-26..2,3 
Marriage*26 Jan 1819 He married Mary Ann Corley at Lexington District, South Carolina, on 26 Jan 1819 at age 18. 
1820 Census*7 Aug 1820 Daniel was listed as the head of a family on the 1820 Census at Edgefield District, South Carolina.4 
Birth of Son1 Feb 1823 His son James Marion Culpepper M.D. was born on 1 Feb 1823 at Milledgeville, Baldwin Co., Georgia
Tax roll*1825 He registered to pay taxes at Baldwin Co., Georgia, in 1825.5 
Birth of Son29 Aug 1825 His son John Francis Culpepper was born on 29 Aug 1825 at Baldwin Co., Georgia
Death*25 Oct 1825 He died at Baldwin Co., Georgia, on 25 Oct 1825 at age 25. 
Land Lottery*1832 Daniel was the deceased whose orphan(s) had a fortunate draw in the land lottery in 1832 at Talbot Co., Georgia,
lot 975/19/3 in what became Paulding Co., GA.6 
Biography* Mrs. J. W. (Ira Gay) Deam of Gay, GA preserved a record of Daniel Peek Culpepper's birth from the John Culpepper Bible which was copied by Mrs. D. W. (Lavyn Wright) Sisco: _________________________Daniel P. Culpepper _________________________b. April, 23 1800 _________________________On Wednesday about sunrise
Shortly after Daniel's birth, he was recorded as one of three males 0-10 years of age in his father's household in the 1800 census of Lexington District, SC. Daniel Peek Culpepper was named after his presumed great grandfather, Daniel Peek, whose name was also spelled Peeke, Peak, and Peake. By 1807, Daniel's father, John Culpepper, had apparently moved his family across the Congaree River to Richland District, SC where John was recorded as an administrator of Daniel Peek's estate. Still in Richland District, SC for the 1810 census, Daniel was recorded as one of five males age 0-10 in the household of John Culpepper. Sometime before the 1813 birth of William Henry Culpepper, Daniel had moved with his parents to Edgefield District, SC. Daniel remained in Edgefield District, SC, presumably living with his parents until he married in 1819.
Daniel emerges as a head of household with his wife (not noted in a census summary but found microfilm copy of actual record) and infant daughter in the 1820 census of Edgefield District, SC. At some point Daniel moved his family to Georgia but no record has been found in 1820 and 1821 Georgia Land Lottery records or in deed or estate records. Daniel's father sold the land "where I live" in Edgefield District, SC in February 1823 but Daniel was apparently already living in Georgia since the Rev. John Butler Culpepper, in a family summary, stated that his father, James Marion Culpepper, Daniel Peek Culpepper's son, was born 1 Feb 1823 in Baldwin Co., GA within sight of Milledgeville. It is not clear how long the family remained in Baldwin Co., GA. A place of birth has not been found for the next child, John Francis Culpepper, and it is possible that he was also born in Baldwin Co, GA in 1825 and that Daniel Peek died there two months later. However Daniel's father was listed as "of Monroe" Co., GA when he bought land in Monroe Co. in 1827 suggesting that the family was in Monroe Co. before 1827 but it is not known if the family was there as early as 1825. Mrs. D. W. Deam and Mrs. D. W. Sisco also preserved the date of Daniel Peek Culpepper's death: _________________________d. October, 25 1825
Daniel was described by a grandson, Rev. John Butler Culpepper, as "a dashing young sport" and a "poor business man" who "in a very short while had run through all his father had given him" and died young, leaving his wife and young children "without the necessities of life."
Mrs. John (Dorothy Culpepper) Wingfield preserved a 25 page typed manuscript "ONE FAMILY - CULPEPPER" written by her grandfather, Rev. George Bright Culpepper, who noted: One of the sons of John Culpepper and his wife was Daniel Peek Culpepper, who was my grandfather. He died when my father was only three years old, leaving my grandmother a widow with three children - Caroline, 5; James Marion, my father, 3; and John Francis, 1.
Since two of the three children had been born in Georgia and had resided there since birth, they were eligible as a family to one draw in the 1832 Gold Lottery of Georgia. They apparently drew lot 975 in district 19 of section 3 which was in the same section and district where John Jefferson Culpepper, Daniel's older brother, had drawn a lot. The land would have been 40 acres near the center of the southern border of Paulding Co., GA. Although they had been in Monroe Co., GA in 1830, at the time of the draw, the children were apparently living in Talbot Co., GA. It is not known if the land was sold but the family apparently never moved to it. 

Family

Mary Ann Corley (circa 1800 - 12 Jun 1851)
Marriage*26 Jan 1819 He married Mary Ann Corley at Lexington District, South Carolina, on 26 Jan 1819 at age 18. 
Children
ChartsHenry Culpeper of Lower Norfolk: DNA Status Chart (Male only, 8 generations)
John Culpepper of Randolph Co, AL: Descendant Chart
Last Edited8 Jul 2008

Citations

  1. 1800 Federal Census, United States.
    Unknown Township, Lexington District, SC
    Joseph Culpepper, page 560, 2 M0-10, 1 M16-26, 1 M26-45, 1 M45+, 1 F0-10, 1 F10-16, 1 F45+
    John Culpepper, page 561, 3 M0-10, 1 M16-26, 1 F0-10, 1 F16-26.
  2. P 173 (John 1m 26-45 w/5m 0-10, 2m 10-16, 1f 0-10, 1f 16-26, 2f 26-45)
    p 173 Nancy (1 of 2 females 26-45 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Joel (1 of 2 males age 10-16 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 John J. (1 of 2 males age 10-16 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Daniel P. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Sarah O. (1 female 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Francis G. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 James I. J. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 George W. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper).
  3. 1810 Federal Census, United States.
    Columbia, Richland District, SC
    John Culpepper, page 173, 5 M0-10, 2 M10-16, 1 M26-45, 1 F0-10, 1 F16-26, 2 F26-45, 16 slaves.
  4. Unknown Townships, Edgefield District, SC
    Daniel Culpepper, page 127, 1 M16-26, 1 F0-10, 1 F16-26, 0 slaves
    Drury Culpepper, page 120, 2 M0-10, 1 M10-16, 1 M26-45, 2 F0-10, 1 F10-16, 1 F26-45, 1 slave
    Joicy Culpepper, page 83, 1 M45+, 1F16-26, 1 F45+, 7 slaves.
  5. Daniel P. Culpepper, Baldwin Co. Tax Digest, Capt. Marcus Huson's Dist., 1825.
  6. Rev. S. Emmett Lucas Jr., The 1832 Gold Lottery of Georgia, Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1988, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 975.8 R2lb.
    Daniel P. Culpepper's Orphans, Sealeys District, Talbot Co., GA, drew lot 975/19/3 in what became Paulding Co., GA, 1832.

Mary Ann Corley

Female, #32059, (circa 1800 - 12 Jun 1851)
Birth*circa 1800 Mary was born at Lexington District, South Carolina, circa 1800. 
Marriage*26 Jan 1819 She married Daniel Peek Culpepper at Lexington District, South Carolina, on 26 Jan 1819. 
Married Name26 Jan 1819  As of 26 Jan 1819, her married name was Culpepper. 
1820 Census7 Aug 1820 Mary was probably a free white female, age 16 and under 26, in Daniel Peek Culpepper's household, on the 1820 Census at Edgefield District, South Carolina.1 
Birth of Son1 Feb 1823 Her son James Marion Culpepper M.D. was born on 1 Feb 1823 at Milledgeville, Baldwin Co., Georgia
Birth of Son29 Aug 1825 Her son John Francis Culpepper was born on 29 Aug 1825 at Baldwin Co., Georgia
Death of Spouse25 Oct 1825 Her husband Daniel Peek Culpepper died on 25 Oct 1825 at Baldwin Co., Georgia
1830 Census*1 Jun 1830 Mary was listed as the head of a family on the 1830 Census at Monroe Co., Georgia. Unaccounted for is a Male 30-40..2 
1840 Census*1 Jun 1840 Mary was listed as the head of a family on the 1840 Census on 1 Jun 1840 at Upson Co., Georgia.3 
1850 Census1 Jun 1850 John, Emma, Mary, Thomas, Daniel, Nancy and Mary listed as a household member living with David George Cooper Jr. on the 1850 Census on 1 Jun 1850 at Talbot Co., Georgia.4 
Death*12 Jun 1851 She died at Talbot Co., Georgia, on 12 Jun 1851.5 
Burial* Her body was interred at Centerville Cemetery, near, Talbotton, Talbot Co., Georgia.6 
Biography*  It is possible that Mary Ann Corley was a sister of Nancy Corley who married Joel Culpepper, the older brother of Mary's husband, Daniel. Based on 1850 census information, Mary was born in South Carolina around 1800. A descendant, Mrs. J. D. (Dorothy Culpepper) Wingfield, copied the following from a Culpepper Family History preserved by Marvin M. Culpepper: [Daniel P. Culpepper] Married Mary A. Corley of Lexington, Kentucky.
      As noted, Mary listed her place of birth as South Carolina in the 1850 census, so the reference was probably to Lexington District, SC, where presumed sister, Nancy, was born and where their widowed mother, Barbara, was recorded in the 1820 census.
      Mary was recorded with her infant daughter in the household of her husband, Daniel, in the 1820 census of Edgefield District, SC. The widowed Mary (Corley) Culpepper emerged as a head-of-household with her young family in the 1830 census of Monroe Co., GA. Her father-in-law, John Culpepper, was living close by. A grandson, John Butler Culpepper, wrote in family notes that Mary then moved to live with or near her brother who was not identified. By 1832, Mary had apparently moved her family to Talbot Co., GA where her children were eligible for a draw in the 1832 Gold Lottery of Georgia. The family was possibly living with her presumed brother, David Corley, who had been recorded in the 1830 census of Talbot County. She also might have been living near Francis G. Culpepper who was also listed in the 1830 census of Talbot Co., GA. It is not known if Mary sold the land that her children had drawn in Paulding Co., GA but she did not move her family to it. Mary's daughter, Nancy Caroline, apparently remained in Talbot Co., GA where she would marry David G. Cooper but by 1840, Mary and her sons had moved to Upson Co., GA. This is where John Jefferson Culpepper had been living in 1830 and what appears to be his son, "John J. Culpeper" was living there in 1840. A 50 year old "Mary Culpepper" born in South Carolina was listed (p. 314, family 1205) in the household of her daughter and son-in-law, David G. Cooper, in the 1850 census of Talbot Co., GA where she died a year later. There is a puzzling note in an 1853 letter of John Culpepper to his son, Francis G. Culpepper. John wrote "Daniels d[itt]o Dead." He wrote this after writing about where "Joel's Widow & family" were living and before mentioning where the children of Daniel and Mary's children were living. If it was a reference to John's son, Daniel P. Culpepper, then it was an odd comment since Daniel had been dead over 25 years and Francis G. Culpepper would have known it. However if the "do" is an abbreviated "ditto" then it was written under the word Widow of the line above in which case the sentence should be read "Daniels [Widow] Dead." According to Marriage and Death Notices from Southern Christian Advocate Vol I: 1837-1860 by Brent H. Holcomb, the following death notice appeared in the 25 Jul 1851 issue of the Southern Christian Advocate: Died in Talbot co., Ga., on the 12th of June, sister Mary Culpepper, in the 51st year of her age....
      This matches everything that is known about Mary (Corley) Culpepper and believed to be her death notice. 
Note* Sarah Corley, born c. 1804, SC, was the second wife of Jacob Rawls, Jr. They married in 1838, presumably in SC, as I don't believe they came into Coweta Co., GA, until 1839. Sarah Corley was the daughter of Lawrence Corley and Annie Barbara Derrick, of Lexington, SC. Sarah had 1 child. She died 10 Aug 1849, of apoplexy and is buried in Mt. Pilgrim Lutheran Church Cemetery, Haralson, Coweta Co., GA. Her headstone says right on it "daughter of the late L. Corly of Lexington Co. S.C." Note his name spelled without an "e." Buried right beside her is Elijah H. Corley, died 10 Sept 1851 aged 48 yrs, 1 month, 28 days. This MIGHT be a brother of hers. I've seen, photographed and done a rubbing of Sarah's headstone.

William Taylor's 1st wife, Rebecca Corley, who he married 30 Sept 1819, Lexington Co., SC, was also a daughter of Lawrence Corley and Annie Barbara Derrick, I'm pretty sure. Rebecca was born 4 May 1800, Lexington Co., SC, and she died 4 June 1863, Haralson, Coweta Co., GA. Likewise, she is buried at Mt. Pilgrim Lutheran Church Cemetery, Haralson, GA. Her headstone says she died 4 June 1863 at 63 years, 1 month. She had 10 children.

I have not pursued Lawrence and Annie Barbara Corley. I do have a birthdate for Annie as 17 June 1770 and a deathdate of 15 March 1858. Both Lawrence and Annie were born in SC. Annie was the daughter of Thomas Derrick, I've been told. That's all I know....7 

Family

Daniel Peek Culpepper (23 Apr 1800 - 25 Oct 1825)
Marriage*26 Jan 1819 She married Daniel Peek Culpepper at Lexington District, South Carolina, on 26 Jan 1819. 
Children
Last Edited27 Feb 2008

Citations

  1. Unknown Townships, Edgefield District, SC
    Daniel Culpepper, page 127, 1 M16-26, 1 F0-10, 1 F16-26, 0 slaves
    Drury Culpepper, page 120, 2 M0-10, 1 M10-16, 1 M26-45, 2 F0-10, 1 F10-16, 1 F26-45, 1 slave
    Joicy Culpepper, page 83, 1 M45+, 1F16-26, 1 F45+, 7 slaves.
  2. 1830 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 194, Unk Twp, Monroe Co., GA
    Mary Culpepper, 1 M0-5, 1M5-10, 1 M30-40, 1 F10-15, 1 F20-30.
  3. 1840 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 34, District 589, Upson Co., GA
    Mary Culpepper, 1 M5-10, 1 M15-20, 1 F30-40.
  4. 1850 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 314, 15th District, Talbot Co., GA
    David G. Cooper, 33, M, Farmer, GA
    Caroline (Culpepper) Cooper, 30, F, GA
    Daniel Cooper, 12, M, GA
    Thomas Cooper, 10, M, GA
    Elizabeth Cooper, 8, F, GA
    Emila Cooper, 5, F, GA
    Frances Cooper, 1, F, GA
    Mary Culpepper, 50, F, GA.
  5. Pike Co. Cemetery Records, Unpublished.
    Vol 1 p 239 25 Jul 1851 issue.
  6. George Bright Culpepper, One Family - Culpepper, James Marion Culpepper family, 25 page, typed manuscript, unpub., 8 Oct 1942.
    p 6.
  7. Ann Cantin, aka Marie Cantlin e-mail address e-mail, June 2001.

Sarah O. Culpepper

Female, #32060, (5 Feb 1802 - 2 Dec 1901)
Father*John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL (1 Oct 1772 - 13 May 1855)
Mother*Nancy Gillespie (c 1778 - 25 Jul 1848)
Name-Psbly She was possibly named Sarah Oglethorpe. 
Birth*5 Feb 1802 Sarah was born at Lexington District, South Carolina, on 5 Feb 1802. 
Employment* Sarah's occupation: housekeeper. 
1810 Census6 Aug 1810 Sarah was probably a free white female under 10 years of age, in John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL's household on the 1810 Census at Richland District, South Carolina. Unaccounted for are 1 male 0-10 and 1 female 16-26..1,2 
Marriage*circa 1820 She married William Elliott at Edgefield District, South Carolina, circa 1820. 
Married Namecirca 1820  As of circa 1820, her married name was Elliott. 
Birth of Sonbetween 1821 and 1839 Her son Lewis? Elliott ? was born between 1821 and 1839 at Georgia
1830 Census1830 Sarah was probably a free white female, age 20 and under 30, in William Elliott's household, on the 1830 Census at Louina, Randolph Co., Alabama.3 
Birth of Soncirca 1830 Her son William T. Elliott was born circa 1830 at Louina, Randolph Co., Alabama
Birth of Son3 Oct 1832 Her son John James Elliott was born on 3 Oct 1832 at Louina, Randolph Co., Alabama
Death of Spousecirca 1839 Her husband William Elliott died circa 1839 at Louina, Randolph Co., Alabama
Birth of Soncirca 1839 Her son Francis G. Elliott was born circa 1839 at Louina, Randolph Co., Alabama
1840 Census* Sarah was listed as the head of a family on the 1840 Census at Louina, Randolph Co., Alabama.
(p. 156). 
Death of Mother25 Jul 1848 Her mother Nancy Gillespie died on 25 Jul 1848 at Meriwether Co., Georgia
1850 Census* Sarah was listed as the head of a family on the 1850 Census at Meriwether Co., Georgia.
(49 f-59th Div p. 323 hh 246). 
Death of Father13 May 1855 Her father John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL died on 13 May 1855 at Randolph Co., Alabama
Death of Son11 Apr 1863 Her son John James Elliott died on 11 Apr 1863. 
Death of Soncirca 1864 Her son Francis G. Elliott died circa 1864. 
1880 Census* Sarah was listed as the head of a family on the 1880 Census at Randolph Co., Alabama.4 
Death*2 Dec 1901 She died at Randolph Co., Alabama, on 2 Dec 1901 at age 99. 
Biography* Census: 1 Oct 1860 Almond P. O. district, near Louina (now Wadley), Randolph Co., AL. \p. 849 #1567 (Sarah A.[is this an "O" being read as a script "A"?] Elliott 58 SC housekeeper $500 real estate $190 personal property).\ Census: 1870 Louina P. O. district (now Wadley), Randolph Co., AL. \p. 572 #8 (Sarah Elliott 68 SC $400 real estate $100 personal property).\ Census: 2 June 1880 Beat #8, Randolph Co., AL. \p 315 #23 (Sarah O. Elliott 78 SC SC SC housekeeper).\ Census: 1900 Flatrock Precinct 8, near Louina (now Wadley), Randolph Co., AL. \ED 58 Sheet 7 Line 32 (Saraeh O. Ellit Feb 1802 SC SC SC mother of 12 children/2 still living in 1900 in hh of daughter Mary J. Dunsith).\
      Mrs. J. W. (Ira Gay) Deam of Gay, GA preserved Sarah O. Culpepper's birth data from the John Culpepper Bible record and this was transcribed by Mrs. D. W. (Lavyn Wright) Sisco: _________________________Sallie O. Culpepper _________________________b. February 5, 1802 _________________________On Friday 1 o'clock P. M.
      Sarah's parents were recorded in the 1800 census of Lexington District, SC and this is presumed to have been Sarah's place of birth although technically it was still considered Orangeburg District until 1804. Sarah moved with her parents to Richland District, SC where she was noted as a female age 0-10 in the 1810 census of the district in the household of her father, John Culpepper. Sometime after this census, but before the 1813 birth of her younger brother, William Henry Culpepper, in 1813, the family moved again to Edgefield District, SC. The family is believed to have remained in the district since Sarah's father was granted land in Edgefield District in 1814 and he sold land in Edgefield District in 1823. Unfortunately, Sarah's father has not been found in the 1820 census of South Carolina or Georgia when Sarah would have been 18 years old.
      We know from later records that Sarah married an Elliott but no marriage record has been found. Since they would presumably have married near the home of the bride, the marriage probably took place in Edgefield District, SC. There was a William Elliott recorded in Edgefield District, SC in the 1820 census but he was at least 30 years older than Sarah and already had a family. Based on census records, Sarah's daughter, Cynthia, was born in Georgia in approximately 1823. This would suggest that Sarah and her husband moved to Georgia ahead of her parents or that Cynthia was born shortly after the family had moved. Sarah's father, John Culpepper, is known to have moved with his extended family to Georgia sometime in 1823 or 1824. Since he appears in Monroe Co., GA land records in 1827 and what appears to be the widowed Sarah and her family are recorded in the 1840 census of Monroe Co., GA, it is important to look at the Elliott's who appeared in land and census records there. A John G. Elliott was listed in 1828 tax records of Monroe Co., GA but no John Elliott's have been found in Monroe Co., GA in the 1830 census. The John Elliot's that have been found in other Georgia census records also do not account for known children of Sarah. A George W. Elliott witnessed the sale of land by John Culpepper in 1828 in the Twelfth District of Monroe Co., GA. He appears to be the "G. W. Elliott" that was recorded in the Muscogee Co., GA in the 1830 census. No daughters were recorded in his household. A "George H. Elliot" was recorded in the 1830 census of Monroe Co., GA with his wife but only two girls under five were recorded in the household. Finally, a "William Elliot" was recorded with his family in the 1830 census of Monroe Co., GA. According to the 1900 census Sarah had 12 children only eight of whom have been identified with any confidence. This William had a wife who was Sarah's age and they had six children, four of whom match the ages of Sarah's known children and the other two are of ages which match gaps in Sarah's known birth record. Supporting William Elliott as Sarah's husband is a reference from p. 161 of Marriages and Death Notices from Southern Christian Advocate - South Carolina 1837-1860: Died in Meriwether Co, Ga., Aug. 5, 1848, Mrs. Eliz. G., wife of Wm. G. Carlile and daughter of William and Sarah Elliott. She was born Monroe Co. Ga. Jan 4, 1827, married Jan. 13, 1846.
      Whatever the name of Sarah's husband, he apparently died before the 1840 census or at least he has not been identified in Georgia census records. The William Elliot and William Elliott's recorded in the 1840 census do not have wives and children that match Sarah and her known children. A "Sarah Elliot" in Warren Co., GA, a "Sally Elliott" who appears to have been associated with Ira Elliott in Raldolph Co., GA, and a "Sarr Elliott" of Monroe Co., GA have been identified in 1840 Georgia census records. "Sarr Elliott" appears to be the closest match based on the number of children in the household and the Monroe Co., GA location, but only seven children were noted and, as noted, according to the 1900 census, Sarah had twelve. In comparing the 1830 and 1840 census records, although three 0-5 year old females were listed in the 1830 census, no 10-15 year old females were listed in 1840. Since two of these daughters have been identified with some confidence from marriage and newspaper records, it is possible that they were visiting relatives when the 1840 census was taken. Their grandparents were living in Meriwether Co., GA in 1840 and this is where one the daughters married in 1848 and where Sarah and her family were noted living in the 1850 census, so perhaps two of missing teenagers were there. The third daughter, possibly born circa 1825 or 1829, was recorded in the 1830 census but was missing from the 1840 census record and might have died before 1840 or might have been off with her sisters and then died or married before the 1850 census but she has not been identified. Following naming patterns, the girl might have been named Sarah after her mother. In addition, the 5-10 year old daughter and one of the 15-20 year old daughters listed in the 1840 census have not been identified from later records. Two 5-10 year old daughters were listed in the 1830 census and were listed again as 15-20 year daughters in the 1840 census. Only Cynthia, who was born circa 1823, has been accounted for. Another daughter, possibly born circa 1821, and possibly named Nancy after Sarah's mother, must have died or married before the 1850 census was taken but no record of her has been found.
      In reviewing all of the records that have been found on the family, only ten of Sarah's children have been noted in census records and of those, only seven have been identified. This leaves two other children that either died young or managed to be missed in the 1830 and 1840 census. Based on census records, there are no significant age gaps for the children. Possibly one or both of the children who have not been accounted for, was a twin.
      By 1850, Sarah had moved on to Meriwether Co., GA where her younger brother, George Washington Culpepper, was living. Possibly she had moved there by 1848 and was caring for her parents when her mother died or possibly she moved onto land that her father and younger brother, William Henry Culpepper, left behind when they moved on to Randolph Co., AL circa 1848. Since John James Elliott, one of Sarah's sons, married in Randolph Co., AL in 1855, Sarah is presumed to have moved her family on to Randolph Co., AL by then. Possibly she had come earlier to care for her aging father who died in 1855 or perhaps she moved onto a portion of his land after his death. Sarah's younger brothers, Lewis Peek and William Henry Culpepper, and older brother John Jefferson Culpepper, were living nearby. This is where Sarah would spend the remainder of her life. She was noted as a housekeeper in the 1860 census of Almond P. O. district, near Louina (now Wadley), Randolph Co., AL. Three of her children and a grandchild were living with her. She had real estate valued as $500 and personal property valued at $190. In the 1870 census, Sarah Elliott was listed in the Louina P. O. district (now Wadley), Randolph Co., AL. She had real estate valued at $400 and personal property valued at $100. A daughter, Cynthia, was living with her. In the 1880 census Sarah was recorded as a housekeeper in Beat #8, Randolph Co., AL. Her daughter, Cynthia, was still living with her. In the 1900 census, Sarah was listed in Flatrock Precinct 8, near Louina (now Wadley), Randolph Co., AL, living with her widowed daughter, Mary J. Dunsith. Sarah was listed as having been the mother of 12 children, 2 of whom were still living in 1900. Only eight of Sarah's children have been accounted for and the two living in 1900 would have been Mrs. J. M. (Martha Elliot) Carlisle who was living in Texas and the daughter Sarah was living with. Sarah could not read or write but her daughter could.
      Mrs. J. W. Deam and Lavyn Sisco also preserved Sarah's death record from the John Culpepper Bible: _________________________d. 1901
      Joseph Richard Culpepper, a nephew, did not record the date of her death but noted that Sarah had died "age 99 yrs. 9 mo 27 days." This would seem to indicate that she died 2 Dec 1901, probably near what is now known as Wadley, Randolph Co., AL, where she was noted in the 1900 census. It is assumed that she was buried in the "Elliott Cemetery" where her daughter, Cynthia, is also supposed to have been buried. This is now the Wadley City Cemetery and no record of Sarah's burial has been found. It is possible that she was buried in an unmarked grave or that the inscription can no longer be read. It is possible that she is in one of the two unmarked graves to the right of her brother, William Henry Culpepper, in the same cemetery. 

Family

William Elliott (circa 1789 - circa 1839)
Marriage*circa 1820 She married William Elliott at Edgefield District, South Carolina, circa 1820. 
Children
ChartsJohn Culpepper of Randolph Co, AL: Descendant Chart
Last Edited31 Jan 2004

Citations

  1. P 173 (John 1m 26-45 w/5m 0-10, 2m 10-16, 1f 0-10, 1f 16-26, 2f 26-45)
    p 173 Nancy (1 of 2 females 26-45 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Joel (1 of 2 males age 10-16 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 John J. (1 of 2 males age 10-16 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Daniel P. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Sarah O. (1 female 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Francis G. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 James I. J. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 George W. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper).
  2. 1810 Federal Census, United States.
    Columbia, Richland District, SC
    John Culpepper, page 173, 5 M0-10, 2 M10-16, 1 M26-45, 1 F0-10, 1 F16-26, 2 F26-45, 16 slaves.
  3. P 185 (William Elliot 1m 40-50 w/1m 0-5 3f 0-5 2f 5-10 1f 20-30)
    p 185 (Sarah 1 female 20-30 in hh of William Elliot).
  4. FHL Film 1254030, National Archives Film T9-0030, Flat Rock, Page 315C.

William Elliott

Male, #32061, (circa 1789 - circa 1839)
Birth*circa 1789 William was born at South Carolina circa 1789. 
Marriage*circa 1820 He married Sarah O. Culpepper at Edgefield District, South Carolina, circa 1820. 
Birth of Sonbetween 1821 and 1839 His son Lewis? Elliott ? was born between 1821 and 1839 at Georgia
1830 Census*1830 William was listed as the head of a family on the 1830 Census at Louina, Randolph Co., Alabama.1 
Birth of Soncirca 1830 His son William T. Elliott was born circa 1830 at Louina, Randolph Co., Alabama
Birth of Son3 Oct 1832 His son John James Elliott was born on 3 Oct 1832 at Louina, Randolph Co., Alabama
Death*circa 1839 He died at Louina, Randolph Co., Alabama, circa 1839. 
Birth of Soncirca 1839 His son Francis G. Elliott was born circa 1839 at Louina, Randolph Co., Alabama
Biography*  William has NOT been proven as the husband of Sarah Culpepper. Joseph Richard Culpepper, a nephew of Sarah (Culpepper) Elliott, believed that Sarah's husband was named John, and there was a John G. Elliott listed in the 1828 Monroe Co., Georgia Tax Digest as having Lot 119 in Coweta District 5 which was 202 1/2 acres and Lot 121 in Applin District which was 490 acres. However, according to the 1900 census, Sarah (Culpepper) Elliott was supposed to have had twelve children, eight of whom have been identified. The 1830 census records for the John Elliott's living in Georgia do not account for the known children of Sarah. There was a G. W. Elliott who witnessed a deed for John Culpepper, Sarah's father, in Monroe Co., GA in 1828 and a George W. Elliott was listed in the 1828 Monroe County Georgia Tax Digest as having Lot 24 in Early County District 17 (Captain Brooks District) which was "250 A. Pine." This was the same district in which Joel Culpepper, John Culpepper's oldest son, and John Dean and John W. Dean, Culpepper in-laws, were listed. But again, his 1830 census record does not account for known children of Sarah.
      It is possible that there were errors in the census records or that the family was overlooked but it is also possible that Joseph Richard Culpepper made an error. The following is from p. 161 of Marriages and Death Notices from Southern Christian Advocate - South Carolina 1837-1860: Died in Meriwether Co, Ga., Aug. 5, 1848, Mrs. Eliz. G., wife of Wm. G. Carlile and daughter of William and Sarah Elliott. She was born Monroe Co. Ga. Jan 4, 1827, married Jan. 13, 1846.
      A William Elliott was listed in the 1830 census of Monroe Co., GA and his census record would account for the known children of Sarah as well as for some that are not known. No marriage record has been found for Sarah and William but they are presumed to have married circa 1820 in Edgefield District, SC where Sarah's parents are believed to have been living. A daughter, Cynthia Elliott, in the 1880 census, listed her parents as having both been born in South Carolina. However, a younger daughter, Mary J. (Elliott) Dunsith, in the 1900 census, indicated that her father had been born in Georgia. There was a William Elliott who was noted in the 1820 census of Edgefield District, SC, however he appeared to be a generation older than Sarah and he already had a family. Perhaps he was William's father.
      William and Sarah and perhaps an infant daughter are believed to have moved from South Carolina circa 1823, along with John Culpepper and his extended family. Based on census records, the oldest known daughter, Cynthia, was born in Georgia circa 1823. William was not listed among "fortunate drawers" of Monroe Co., GA in the 1827 Georgia Land Lottery. According to 1830 Monroe Co., GA census records, William and Sarah had six children.
      A "William Elliot" of Lester's district, Monroe Co., GA was listed as a fortunate drawer in the 1832 Cherokee Land Lottery. As a married man who was a U.S. citizen and who had resided in Georgia for at least three years, he was eligible for two draws. He drew lot 33 in District 12, Section 3. The lot was 160 acres located in the northeast quadrant of Murray Co., GA and William had secured his grant by Jan 1838 when the list was published but it is not known if he then sold the land. He does not appear to have moved his family to it. The census records of the William Elliot and William Elliott's that were living in Georgia were checked but do not appear to correspond to known children of William and Sarah (Culpepper)Elliott. In addition, a "Sarr" Elliott was listed in the 1840 census of Monroe Co., GA with children that correspond in age to known children of Sarah plus children that, in combination with the 1830 census, would account for eleven of the twelve children that Sarah is supposed to have had. This would suggest that Sarah's husband had died before the 1840 census. 

Family

Sarah O. Culpepper (5 Feb 1802 - 2 Dec 1901)
Marriage*circa 1820 He married Sarah O. Culpepper at Edgefield District, South Carolina, circa 1820. 
Children
Last Edited22 Feb 2002

Citations

  1. P 185 (William Elliot 1m 40-50 w/1m 0-5 3f 0-5 2f 5-10 1f 20-30)
    p 185 (Sarah 1 female 20-30 in hh of William Elliot).

Francis Gillespie Culpepper

Male, #32062, (31 Jan 1804 - 21 Oct 1903)
Father*John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL (1 Oct 1772 - 13 May 1855)
Mother*Nancy Gillespie (c 1778 - 25 Jul 1848)
DNA* Francis has been proven by DNA and genealogical research to be a descendant of Joseph Culpepper of Edgecombe Co., NC, who is a son of Robert Culpepper of Lower Norfolk, the son of Henry Culpepper of Lower Norfolk, VA. 
Name Variation He was also known as Frank. 
Birth*31 Jan 1804 Francis was born at Edgefield District, South Carolina, on 31 Jan 1804. 
1810 Census6 Aug 1810 Daniel, Francis, James and George was probably a free white male, age under 10, in John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL's household on the 1810 Census at Richland District, South Carolina. Unaccounted for are 1 male 0-10 and 1 female 16-26..1,2 
Marriage*circa 1822 He married Martha Bales at Edgefield District, South Carolina, circa 1822. 
Death of Spouse23 Nov 1823 His wife Martha Bales died on 23 Nov 1823 at Edgefield District, South Carolina
Marriage*13 Jan 1825 He married Eglintine Langley on 13 Jan 1825 at age 20. 
Birth of Son5 Dec 1825 His son Daniel F. Culpepper was born on 5 Dec 1825 at Louina, Randolph Co., Alabama
Birth of Son9 Aug 1827 His son John Thomas Jefferson Culpepper was born on 9 Aug 1827 at Louina, Randolph Co., Alabama
Birth of Son11 Mar 1829 His son William R. Culpepper was born on 11 Mar 1829 at Talbot Co., Georgia
1830 Census*1 Jun 1830 Francis was listed as the head of a family on the 1830 Census at Talbot Co., Georgia. The enumerator recorded 3 Females 0-5 and no Male children. We believe this was an error and should have been recorded as 3 Males 0-5..3 
Birth of Son28 Jul 1830 His son Joel W. Culpepper was born on 28 Jul 1830 at Talbot Co., Georgia
Birth of Son28 Jul 1833 His son James Louis Culpepper was born on 28 Jul 1833 at Louina, Randolph Co., Alabama.4 
Birth of Son17 Oct 1834 His son Shadrach Dixon Culpepper was born on 17 Oct 1834 at Chambers Co., Alabama
Indian Wars*1836 He served in one of the Creek and Seminole Indian Wars in 1836
(Francis Gillespie Culpepper served as a private in the company commanded by Captain Slaughter in the regiment of Cavalry commanded by Col. R.T. Webb in the Creek Indian war of 1836. He enlisted at Lafayette Courthouse, AL on or about 17 May 1836, and was honorably discharged at Fort Henderson, AL on 18 Nov 1836. (From pension application.)) 
Birth of SonJan 1836 His son Benjamin Francis Culpepper was born in Jan 1836 at Chambers Co., Alabama
1840 Census*1 Jun 1840 Francis was listed as the head of a family on the 1840 Census on 1 Jun 1840 at Chambers Co., Alabama.5 
Death of Mother25 Jul 1848 His mother Nancy Gillespie died on 25 Jul 1848 at Meriwether Co., Georgia
Death of SonAug 1848 His son Joel W. Culpepper died in Aug 1848. 
Photographed*say 1850 He was photographed say 1850
Family tradition is that Francis G. did not want his picture taken. The family story is that this one picture of him was taken with the aid of a mirror. (smile.)6
Francis G. Culpepper
1850 Census*1 Jun 1850 Francis was listed as the head of a family on the 1850 Census on 1 Jun 1850 at Lafayette Co., Mississippi.7 
1850 Slave Census*1 Jun 1850 Francis was listed as a slave owner on the 1850 Census at Lafayette Co., Mississippi, and owned 2 Black females, ages 30 and 6, and 1 Mulatto female, age 2.8 
Death of Son24 Dec 1854 His son Benjamin Francis Culpepper died on 24 Dec 1854 at Lavaca Co., Texas
Death of Father13 May 1855 His father John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL died on 13 May 1855 at Randolph Co., Alabama
1860 Census*1 Jun 1860 Francis was listed as the head of a family on the 1860 Census at Lavaca Co., Texas.9 
1870 Census*1 Jun 1870 Francis was listed as the head of a family on the 1870 Census at Lavaca Co., Texas.10 
Death of Spouse3 Apr 1878 His wife Eglintine Langley died on 3 Apr 1878 at Lavaca Co., Texas
1880 Census*1 Jun 1880 Francis was listed as the head of a family on the 1880 Census at Lavaca Co., Texas.11 
Death of Son14 Jul 1898 His son Shadrach Dixon Culpepper died on 14 Jul 1898 at Texas
1900 Census1 Jun 1900 Francis was listed as a father-in-law in Benjamin Franklin Burke's household on the 1900 Census at Old Sweet Home, Lavaca Co., Texas.12 
Death of Son3 Dec 1900 His son Daniel F. Culpepper died on 3 Dec 1900 at Hondo, Medina Co., Texas
Death of Son1 Aug 1902 His son John Thomas Jefferson Culpepper died on 1 Aug 1902 at Lavaca Co., Texas
Death*21 Oct 1903 He died at Old Sweet Home, Lavaca Co., Texas, on 21 Oct 1903 at age 99.13 
Burial*circa 23 Oct 1903 His body was interred circa 23 Oct 1903 at Mount Olive Cemetery, Lavaca Co., Texas.14
Biography*  Mrs. J. W. (Ira Gay) Deam of Gay, GA preserved a copy of a John Culpepper Bible record of Francis Gillespie Culpepper's birth which was copied by Mrs. D. W. (Lavyn Wright) Sisco as follows: _________________________Francis Gillespie Culpepper _________________________b. January 31, 1804 _________________________On Friday 3 o'clock P. M. The record was originally copied after 1909 since William Henry Culpepper's death in 1909 was noted but before 1915 since Lewis Peek Culpepper was also listed as "Living in Chambers Co., Ala." A perpetual calendar shows that 31 Jan 1804 would have been a Tuesday. Possibly the "Friday" was picked up from the birth record of Sarah O. Culpepper which was just above that of Francis Gillespie Culpepper. A copy of the "BIBLE FAMILY RECORD OF FRANCIS G. & EGLINTINE CULPEPPER" appears to list the following: _________________________F G Culpepper was _________________________Born Jan 31 1804 In an article about Francis Gillespie Culpepper, the 2 Feb 1898 Shiner Gazette noted that he was born "January 31st 1806" but then went on to state that on 31 Jan 1898 (the year the article was written) Francis "was ninety-four years old." 1898-94=1804. Francis G. Culpepper's brother, Lewis Peek Culpepper, wrote in a 19 Mar 1898 letter to B. F. Burke with whom F. G. Culpepper was living that after reading the article he found it to be a "tolerable correct historical account with one Exception the paper says he was born 1806, the record says 1804...." "The record" is presumably a reference to a Bible record. To further complicate the issue, F. G. Culpepper was listed as having been born Jan 1803 in the 1900 census. This information was presumably supplied by B. F. or Georgia Burke with whom F. G. Culpepper was living.
      As for Francis Gillespie Culpepper's place of birth, the 2 Feb 1898 Shiner Gazette story noted that "He was born in Edgefield District South Carolina...." Francis G. Culpepper also swore that he was born in Edgefield District, SC in a 1902 Indian War survivor application. John Culpepper, the father of Francis G., was listed with his wife and young family in Lexington District, SC in the 1800 census. In 1807, John Culpepper was listed in Richland District, SC records as administrator of an estate. Richland District was across the Congaree River from Lexington District, SC. John Culpepper does not appear in Edgefield District land records until 1814 when received a state land grant. William Henry Culpepper, who was born in 1813, listed his place of birth as Edgefield District, SC in Civil War records, but although John appeared to have been in Edgefield District before receiving the land grant, it seems more likely that he was in Lexington District, SC or Richland District, SC at the time of Francis Gillespie Culpepper's birth. But Francis G. Culpepper would definitely have spent his childhood in Edgefield District, SC.
      Francis was recorded with his parents in the 1810 census of Richland District, SC. Unfortunately, Francis G. Culpepper's, father has not been found in the 1820 census but John Culpepper was presumably living in Edgefield District, SC since that is where he sold the land "where I now live" in 1823. This is also where Francis G. Culpepper presumably married his first wife Martha Bales who died there in Nov 1823. Shortly after this Francis G. moved on to Georgia presumably following his parents and siblings.
      By Jan 1825, Francis G. Culpepper was in Monroe Co., GA where he married his second wife Eglentine Langley and by 1830 he had moved his young family to Talbot Co., GA where "Francis G. Culpepper" was noted in the 1830 census. Unfortunately, according to a microfilm copy of the census, his three young sons were recorded as females 0-5 years of age. No record of Francis G. Culpepper has been found in the 1832 Gold or Cherokee Land Lottery records. The "Francis Culpepper" listed in the 1832 Cherokee Land Lottery of Georgia records was a widow and was not Francis G. Culpepper. According to an 1898 article in the u. Shiner Gazette r. Francis G. Culpepper moved his family to Alabama in 1834. The same article states that Francis G. Culpepper "participated in the Creek War in Alabama, his commanding officer being Captain Slaughter." Francis G. Culpepper's younger brother, James, also served in the Creek War according to the pension application of James' widow, Martha B. Culpepper. The following is Francis G. Culpepper's pension application (Indian Wars application #4660): INDIAN WAR PENSIONS.--Act of July 27, 1892. DECLARATION OF SURVIVOR FOR PENSION WHO SERVED BETWEEN 1832 AND 1842, INCLUSIVE. State of Texas, County of Lavaca, ss:
      ON THIS 30th day of Sept, A. D. one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three, personally appeared before me, a Notary Public within and for the County and State aforesaid, F. G. Culpepper, aged 89 years, 8 mos a resident of Lavaca County J [appears to be indicating that Lavaca should have been put in this place instead of before the word County], State of Texas, who, being by me duly sworn according to law, depose and says:
      That he is a citizen of the United States, and is the identical F. G. Culpepper who served under the name of F. G. Culpepper, as a private in the company commanded by Captain Slaughter, in the ______ regiment of Cavalry, commanded by Col R T Webb in the Creek Indian war of 18 36. That he enlisted at Lafayette Courthouse Ala, on or about the 17th day of May A. D. 1836, for the term of __________, and was honorably discharged at Fort Henderson Ala, on or about the 18th day of Nov, A. D. 18 36 That he is _____ married; that the maiden name of his wife was Eglantine Langley to whom he was married in Monro County, in the State of Georgia, on the 13th day of Jan, A. D. 1825; that his wife is now dead, having died on the 3rd day of April, A. D. 1878, at Sweet Home, in the State of Texas; and that he has not since remarried. That the name of his present wife is __________.
      That in support and proof of his right to pension he will hereafter submit such evidence as may be required under the rules and regulations prescribed by the Secretary of the Interior __________ That he has not heretofore made application for pension or bounty-land, which said claim is No. _____ That he is not a pensioner of the United States __________, at the rate of _____ dollars per month. That since his discharge from said service he has resided as follows, to wit: in Ala until 1846, in Miss until 1852 in Texas to present time.
      That he makes this declaration for the purpose of being placed on the pension-roll of the United States under the provisions of the Act of July 27th, 1892. That he hereby appoints, with full power of substitution and revocation, W. W. Dudley & Co. successors to Wm. W. Dudley, Washington, D. C., his true and lawful attorney to prosecute his claim.
      His post-office address is Sweet Home Lavaca County Texas /s/_J._T._J._Culpepper__________/s/_F_G_Culpepper /s/_James_Dufner
      Also personally appeared J T J Culpepper, residing at Sweet Home Tex, and Jas Dufner, residing at Sweet Home Tex, persons whom I certify to be respectable and entitled to credit, and who, being by me duly sworn, say that they were present and saw F. G. Culpepper, the claimant, sign his name (or make his mark) to the foregoing declaration; that they have every reason to believe, from the appearance of said claimant and their acquaintance with him for 66 years and 40 years, respectively, that he is the identical person he represents himself to be: and that they have no interest in the prosecution of this claim. ________________________________/s/_J_T_J_Culpepper ________________________________/s/_James_Dufner
      Sworn to and subscribed before me this 30th day of Sept, A. D. 189 3; and I hereby certify that the contents of the above declaration, &c., were fully made known and explained to the applicant and witnesses before swearing, including the words __________ erased, and the words __________ added; and that I have no interest, direct or indirect, in the prosecution of this claim. ________________________________/s/_F._G._Patton_N_P ____________________________________Lavaca County Texas
      The 1893 application was rejected because the Second Auditor's Office of Treasury Department found "no roll of the Co. [Captain Slaughter's] has been found." Perhaps the records were destroyed during the Civil War or perhaps records of a volunteer unit were not kept. In 1902 a second application was made: DECLARATION OF SURVIVOR OF INDIAN WAR. Acts of July 27, 1892, and June 27, 1902. State of Texas, County of Lavaca, ss:
      ON THIS 7th day of August A. D. 190 2 personally appeared before me, a Notary Public within and for the County and State aforesaid, Francis G. Culpepper aged 98 years, a resident of Sweet Home, County of Lavaca, State of Texas, who being duly sworn according to law, declares that he is the identical person who served under the name of Francis G. Culpepper in the company commanded by Captain Slaughter, in the Cavalry regiment of Alabama Vols, commanded by Col R T. Webb in the Creek Indian war of 18 36; that he enlisted at Fort Henderson Ala on or about the 15th day of May, 18 36, and was honorably discharged at Fort Henderson Ala, on or about the 1st of November, 18 36; that he also served in _____ Company, in the ______ Regiment of __________ Vols., from __________, to __________, and that he has not been employed or paid in the military or naval service of the United States since the 1st day of Nov., 18 36
      That at the time of his first enlistment he was 32 years of age, five feet eight inches in height, with Blue eyes Brown hair, medium fair complexion, and by occupation a Farmer, and that he was born in the County of Edgefield, State of South Carolina. That since leaving the service he has resided as follows: In Alabama until 1844, then in Miss until 1851, then in Texas to the present time That he is _____ now a widower. That the maiden name of his last wife was Eglentine Langley. That he was married to her on the 9th day of January, 18 25, at Monroe County, State of Ga. That he had __________ been previously married. That his former wife, whose maiden name was Martha Bails, died at Edgefield County State of South Carolina, on the 23rd day of November, 18 23. That he has _____ heretofore applied for pension, the number of his claim being 4.660 That he has not applied for bounty-land, and received land-warrant No. 337984 for ______ acres, about __________, 18 __.
      That he is a citizen of the United States and makes this application for the purposes of obtaining a pension under the provisions of the Act of July 27, 1892, as extended by the act of June 27, 1902; and hereby appoints W W Dudley & Co, of Washington D. C. his true and lawful attorney to prosecute his claim. That his post-office is Sweet Home, County of Lavaca, State of Texas ATTEST: 1__/s/_A._G._Patton________________his ______________________/s/_Francis G X Culpepper 2__/s/_W_P_Bullard_________________mark
      Also personally appeared A G Patten, residing in Sweet Home Tex, and W P Bullard, residing at Sweet Home Texas, persons whom I certify to be respectable and entitled to credit, and who, being by me duly sworn, say that they were present and saw Francis G Culpepper, claimant, sign his name (or make his mark) to the foregoing declaration; that they have every reason to believe from the appearance of said claimant and their acquaintance with him of 54 years and 12 years respectively, that he is the identical person he represents himself to be; and that they have no interest in the prosecution of this claim. ATTEST: 1_______________________________/s/_A._G._Patton 2_______________________________/s/_W._P._Bullard
      Sworn to and subscribed before me this 7th day of Aug, A. D. 190 2 and I do hereby certify that the contents of the foregoing declaration and affidavit were fully made known and explained to the applicant and witnesses before swearing, including the words Married & present erased, and the words a widower & last added; and that I have no interest, direct or indirect, in the prosecution of this claim. ________________________________/s/_F._G._Patton ____________________________________Notary Public ____________________________________Lavaca County Texas
      Accompanying the application was an affidavit by G. P. Humphreys: I G. P. Humpreys have known the Claimant Francis G Culpepper ever since 1835 he is the identical person he represents himself to be. Know of my own knowledge that he was a soldier in the second war of 1836 aganste the Creek Indians this testimonee is not adid [aided] by the use of any printed or writen statement or recitel prepared or dictated by any other person and further this information is writen by myself and I know that Said F. G. Culpepper was a member of Capt Slaughter's Co Ala Cav in sad [said] warre [war].
      Hon. Evan Goodwin Richards, who was an early settler in Chambers Co., AL which had been Creek land, wrote a series of articles on early Chambers County which were published in the LaFayette Sun in 1890. In Fall 1942, the articles were republished by the Court of County Commissioners of Chambers County as "REMINISCENCES OF THE EARLY DAYS OF CHAMBERS COUNTY" in the Alabama Historical Quarterly. In this pamphlet, Hon. E. G. Richards noted: That portion of East Alabama formerly occupied by the Creek tribe of Indians was ceded by them to the United States by treaty in the Spring of the year 1832. At the session of the Legislature of the State of Alabama in 1832-3, said territory was dived into counties and that portion known as Chambers county was so named in honor of Dr. Henry Chambers....
      The Hon. E. G. Richards went on to discuss the Creek War: I promised in my last to write in my next article on what I considered caused the war between the Creek tribe of Indians and the United States in the State of Alabama in the year 1836. What caused said war is a question much more easily asked than answered. To answer correctly one must know something of the surroundings of that tribe of Indians. They had been a large and warlike tribe and originally occupied a large territory. But by the results of the war of 1815 their territory was reduced in boundary by the State of Georgia on the east, and to the eastern line of Pike and Montgomery counties, on the lower part of their territory and the Coosa River of the upper part of their territory on the West. This narrow strip of country constituted the Creek territory from 1815 to the time of said war. Here these people were born. It was the land of their fathers. They had the attachments for the home of their birth that, history, both sacred and profane, teaches us is common to the human family. These people constituted no exception to that rule. The common Indian was unalterably opposed to removing to any other country or giving up their home here. But as the country, both in Alabama and Georgia, began to be settled to the Indian territory the white people began in various ways to intrude on the Indians. Large hunting companies went on their territory and killed up the deer and turkey which were their main supply of meat. Many settled among them, so that by the Spring of 1832 it was plain to all intelligent Indians that the white people intended to have their lands. A council was held and a delegation of Chiefs were sent to Washington to see the President to see what could be done to prevent further intrusion by the whites. While there on the 24th day of March 1832, a treaty was constituted between the United States and said Chiefs by which the latter deeded to the United States all their territory in Alabama. But knowing the strong opposition of the common Indian to removal, their Chiefs were careful to have it provided in said treaty that lands should be surveyed by the United States and each Indian, the head of a family, should have as a homestead a half section, 320 acres of land and the Chiefs a section, 640 acres. The treaty further provided that each Indian might sell his reservation after location, if he desired to do so, or if he preferred to remain on it, after five years he should receive title thereto. This provision for a time was acceptable to the common Indians. But as soon as the lands were surveyed and while the agents of the government of the United States were locating the Indians on their respective reservations, companies were formed for the purpose of buying up said lands for speculation, and to aid them in their purchases. Stores were established in nearly every neighborhood, where there was a settlement of Indians, with stocks of such goods as suited the Indians, including an ample supply of whiskey. These speculators commenced buying up the lands as fast as the Indians would sell them after location--the Indians knowing but little of the value of land. Many of them sold for very small sums and that in some instances paid in whiskey and dry goods at large profits. While these proceedings were being had the Indians were becoming idle, and in the year 1835 they failed to cultivate their patches of corn as formerly and the Spring of 1836 found them without the means of subsistence. The white people had settled among them and killed up the deer. Many of them had spent the money, or what they had got for their lands and they found themselves on the point of starvation. Land gone, money gone, and they were compelled soon to leave the home of their birth empty handed and to move to a strange land they had never seen, without hope of ever again seeing the land of their fathers, this not strange that these things should have begotten in them a spirit of revenge. Their savage nature prompted them to such revenge. Their hatred was against the white man. It was the white man that had gotten their lands and their money and was then compelling them to move from their native land. They did not discriminate between the speculator who had gotten their lands for a trifle, and the settler who had paid the speculator a fair price for a home to live on, but when they reached the point of revenge, killed the first man they could. Harper was a quiet citizen but was in a neighborhood surrounded by Indians and was their first victim in this county. I have no thought there was any other than that feeling of revenge that caused the death of Harper and of other depredations committed by them in the counties of Russell, Macon and Barbour. There was at no time any regular organized Indian army. Their Chiefs knew they were too weak to fight the United States and did not formerly declare war against the United States. But they could not restrain the common Indian from committing depredations on the white people and their property in private. The trouble lasted only a few months. General Jessup, with a few United States Troops, were ordered to collect the Creek Indians at Tallassee in Tallapoosa county, Alabama, which he did in the early fall of 1836, and moved them to the Indian territory west of the Mississippi river....
      Based on the Indian War pension applications, Francis G. Culpepper apparently moved his family to Mississippi between 1844 and 1846. F. G. Culpepper was noted as a farmer with his second wife and younger children in the 1850 census of Lafayette Co, MS. He owned real estate valued at $1,000. Again based on the Indian War pension applications, Francis G. Culpepper moved his family to Texas between 1851 and 1852. The family tradition is that the youngest child, Georgia Ann Texas, was born en route to Texas which would have been in March 1851. Francis Culpeper was listed in the 1860 census of Hallettsville, Lavaca Co., TX with his second wife and six daughters and a son "Shadrick." Francis had real estate valued at $4,500 and personal property valued at $3,500.
      Mrs. J. L. (Vivian Hastings) Culpepper noted that 24 Jun 1854 a decision was made to organize a Baptist church in the area of Sweet Home, Lavaca Co., TX and 21 Apr 1855 the following Constitution was written for Mount Olive Church: Constitution of Mt. O. C. 1st__Acording to previous notice given a number of Bro.s & Sisters met in Convention at the House of Elder I. Harbour of the regular Baptist faith and Order for the purpose of Organizing And Constituting a Church. 2nd__Elder, O. Guthrie preached an introductory Sermond applicable to the Occasion. 3rd__Elder, O. Guthrie was chosen Mod[erato]r and F. G. Culpepper Clerk 4th__An abstract of principles was produced from the Miss[issippi?] which was read and being, unobjectionable, the Following Bro's & Sisters handed in their letters Elder Isaah Harbour and his Wife Sister Ginsey Harbour _____Letter from Shilo Church Yellowbushey [Yalobusha] County Miss Sister Elizabeth Gage _____Letter from Mulberry Church Fayett C[oun]ty Texas Bro & Sister Culpepper _____Joint Letter from Leodecea(?) Church Layfayett C[oun]ty Miss Elder Orin Guthrie and Wife handed in a joint letter from Mulberry Church Fayett county Texas. Bro. ___? Thigpen handed in a letter from Mt. Olive Church. Pearl River Louisanna All the above named letters was read and there being no objection was recd The right hand of fellowship was Extended one towards or to another and they then Pronounced themselves an organized - Church. After Prayer by Bro. Harbour the Church set in Conference 1st Chose Elder O. Guthrie As their Moderator and F. G. Culpepper Clerk
      Mrs. J. L. (Vivian Hastings) Culpepper noted that the church was to be built "on Sister Guthrie's land." Oren Guthrie, the first Moderator (Pastor?) died 9 Oct 1854 and according to Mrs. J. L. Culpepper he was buried "at Mt Olive Cemetery. It is upon his and his wife Eliza's land that church is built."
      The Civil War began, and on p. 57 of On The Headwaters of the Lavaca and the Navidad Paul C. Boethel noted: In April, 1862, the conscript law was enacted, making liable for active military service all men between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five except those exempt by law.
      "F. G. Culpepper, over 50 years old" was noted on the 3 Aug 1863 roster of "The Lavaca Minutemen."
      After the war, Frank Culpepper was listed as a farmer with $1,500 in real estate and $1,500 in personal property in the 1870 Lavaca Co., TX census. Frank's son, Daniel F. Culpepper, was living in the household with his two daughters, Mattie and Mary. A. In addition to Frank's children, "Shadrick D.", Amanda, and Georgia were also living at home. "John Holy" who has not been identified was also listed in the household. In the 1880 census of Lavaca Co., TX, Frank Culpepper was listed with his second wife, Eglentine, and youngest daughter, Georgia. It should be noted that the Bible Record, the tombstone, a newspaper article and pension applications record the death of Francis G. Culpepper's wife in 1878. Her appearance in the 1880 census is a mystery unless the census taker resurrected her because he was being paid by the head. Francis G. Culpepper listed his father as having been born in North Carolina but John Culpepper listed his own place of birth as South Carolina in the 1850 census. Francis listed his mother as having been born in South Carolina.
      Francis Gillespie Culpepper's picture and biography appeared in the Shiner Gazette , Lavaca County, TX, on Wednesday, February 2, 1898: The Oldest Man in Lavaca County Monday, January 31st, Francis Culpepper, living about six miles east of Shiner and one mile north of Old Sweet Home, was ninety-four years old. His home is with Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Burke, Mrs. Burke being his daughter. He is the head of all the Culpepper family in this part of Texas.
The picture given above is from an old daguerrotype, taken years ago, and is a faithful likeness. Mr. Culpepper is hale and strong, and anyone unacquainted with his real age would never think for a moment that he was more than sixty or seventy years old. His eyes are bright and sparkling, his voice strong, his bearing good, and he really looks no older than some of his children. He was born in Edgefield District, South Carolina, January 31st 1806 [read 1804, the first paragraph of the article said that on 31 Jan 1898 (the year the article was written) Francis "was ninety-four years old." 1898-94=1804. Also see brother, Lewis Peek Culpepper, correcting this to 1804 based on John Culpepper family Bible record]. There he grew up to manhood, working on the farm, and was married at the age of eighteen to Miss Martha Bales. She was thrown from a horse while out riding and fatally injured. In 1823 Mr. Culpepper was again married, this time to Miss Agaltine Langley, by whom he had sixteen children. His second marriage took place in Georgia, where he had removed in 1823. In 1834 he removed with his family to Alabama, where he resided until 1846, when he moved to Lafayette County, MS. In 1851 he joined a party enroute for Texas, and crossing the Mississippi at Vicksburg, he set out for Texas overland through north Louisiana.
He had been preceded to Texas by two of his sons who had settled at this present place of residence, east of where Shiner now stands. Here Mr. Culpepper together with Dr. Patton invested in some twelve hundred acres of land, and has resided here in Texas ever since. His wife died in 1878 and he has since resided with his youngest daughter, Mrs B. F. Burke. Mr. Culpepper has had sixteen children, ten of whom are still living. They are, Daniel F., J. T. J., William R., Mrs. Martha Guthrie, James L., Mrs. Malinda Mauldin, Mrs. Amanda Guthrie, Mrs. Melvina Morris, Mrs. Selma Guthrie and Mrs. Georgia Burke. Another daughter, Mrs. Mary McGinty, died the 9th of last month. Up to 1894 Francis Culpepper had had one hundred and twelve grandchildren and seventy-one great grandchildren, twenty-five of whom were dead at that time. Since then there figures have greatly changed, especially as to the great grandchildren. Numbers of the great grandchildren have married since then and the list of great grandchildren has run up to about one hundred. There have been a few deaths in the family. Of the grand children we know of but one, that of Ben F., son of J. T. J. Culpepper. One morning nearly two years ago, all Lavaca county was shocked by the news that Tax Collector Ben Culpepper had killed himself at Halletsville [sic]. Everybody mourned him as he was a general favorite and was generally spoken of as the most popular man in Lavaca county. He had held the office of tax collector for years, and could have held it as long as he lived. No reason has ever been assigned for his rash act. F. O. Culpepper and family recently removed from Shiner to a distant part of the state. Harve and Leo married several years ago and are now farming in Bee county, their post office address is Pettus. James L., junior, and R. L. Culpepper married about a year ago. The former is living east of town and the latter near Yoakum. Abe, son of William R., was the last to get married. The happy event taking place about three weeks ago. The name of Culpepper is an honorable one all through this section. Nobody ever heard of a Culpepper doing a dishonorable act. Nobody ever heard of a Culpepper that wouldn't pay his debts. It is a name to be proud of. Francis Culpepper participated in the Creek War in Alabama, his commanding officer being Captain Slaughter. He relates some thrilling stories of his early days in Georgia and Alabama. His memory is perfect, and some of his experiences would make interesting reading. His grandmother was a sister to General Oglethorpe, and several of the family bear that name. The GAZETTE hopes that he may live to see 1900, and indeed there seems to be no reason why he should not.
      F. G. Culpepper" was listed in the 1900 census of Lavaca Co., TX in the household of his son-in-law, B. F. Burke. Francis was listed as having been born Jan 1803 in North Carolina. This information was presumably supplied by someone else, possibly B. F. Burke, since all earlier census records give South Carolina as the place of birth and the 1804 birth date was from a family Bible.
      Francis Gillespie Culpepper's death was recorded in the "BIBLE FAMILY RECORD OF FRANCIS G. & EGLINTINE CULPEPPER": _________________________Francis G. Culpepper _________________________Died Oct 21st A D 1903 _________________________At Sweet Home Texas
      According to the Lavaca Co., TX death certificate (#8 recorded 24 Dec 1903, reported 21 Nov 1903). Francis G. Culpepper was aged 99 years 8 months and 20 days when he died 21 Oct 1903 in the P.M. He was an American citizen and he died at "Old Sweet Home" Lavaca Co., TX. According to C. B. Patton, M.D. who reported the death, Francis G. Culpepper died of "General Debility."
      Mrs. Travis (Jacqueline Lorenz) McClinton noted directions to the Mt. Olive Cemetery, Lavaca Co., TX where Francis G. Culpepper is buried: Take 77A south out of Hallettsville to FM 531. Go right on FM 531 to the first road to the right and the cemetery is up this road on the left about .3 miles.
      Mrs. McClinton also noted a granite marker at the entrance: Francis G. Culpepper Came to Texas in 1851 With his wife and 16 Children, also brought A colony He was a Primitive Baptist A descendant of Lord Culpepper of England And an outstanding citizen Of Lavaca County Born__January 31, 1804 Died__October 21, 1903
      Dorothy Nash Roberts wrote 5 Sep 1981: The descendants of Francis Gillespie and Eglentine Langley Culpepper have a reunion each year at Old Sweet Home, Texas, in Lavaca County. It is held the first Sunday in May [now moved to October], and one of the purposes is to maintain the family graveyard where many of the family are buried. The food they bring is unbelievable.
      In addition, Tom Culpepper, a great great grandson of Francis Gillespie and Eglintine (Langley) Culpepper set up the Culpepper Heritage Association in order to preserve the information which his grandfather, Rev. Charles Lee Culpepper, Sr., had collected about the family including the following which was written by Mrs. F. L. (Jessie Burke) Heard: MY MEMORIES OF GRANDFATHER by Jessie Burke Heard In the year 1851, my grandfather, F. G. Culpepper came to Texas, and settled in Lavaca Co. about twelve miles from Hallettsville. He brought a Colony of people from the states of Virginia, N. Carolina, S. Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi. The only names of the people he brought that I can recall are: Dr. A. G. Patton and family, Sol West and family, the McCutcheons and the Bennets. It must have been in the spring of 1851 when they arrived at the place he decided to settle, as I remember mama [Mrs. B. F. (Georgia Culpepper) Burke] having told me that he said it was late in the afternoon when they got here, and he stopped the wagons and told the people that this was the place he wanted to make his home, so he then and there named the place Sweet Home. In later years, after the railroad came to Texas, a new Sweet Home was built five miles south of what was now old Sweet Home. Grandfather and Dr. A. G. Patton bought two sections of land between Rocky Creek and Mustang, which he later sold to his sons as they married, with the exception of that which he kept for himself. He had sixteen children, nine sons and seven daughters, of which my mother was the youngest child, having been born in a covered wagon coming from Georgia to Texas, so he named her Georgia Ann Texas Culpepper. With the help of his older sons they built a rather large house of logs, with a double rock chimney in the center, and two large bedrooms on either side of the chimney. The bed rooms were 20x20 ft. and then two smaller bedrooms on either end of the front porch. A hall way led to the dining room and to the kitchen. This house was a story and one half, and later Grandfather covered the logs with clapboards, that is with twelve inch wide boards with slats over the perpendicular boards and painted it white, making a very nice looking house, and there is where my mother lived all her life. After I was born, and was about six years old, my father built another dining room, and made a bedroom for Sister Mattie and me out of the old dining room. This house was in a very pretty setting of large liveoak trees. There were three large liveoaks in the front of the house which faced south, two on the west side, two on northwest, and three in the back yard, and three east in the horse lot near the barns. There were three or four more southwest of the house in and near the milking pen. The odd thing about these beautiful trees was, they grew in twos or threes. When Grandfather first came to Texas, the Indians were a constant bother and I remember my Grandfather (Daddy as we all called him), telling how he used to take Grandmother and the children down in the field and hide them in the tall weeds to protect them when he heard that the Indians were coming. Then he and his older sons would get their guns and watch out for the Indians. They were not always hostile, sometimes only hungry, and wanted food. My brother Dick recalls Grandfather telling of one time when an Indian came and made off with his vest, (weskit as he would have called it) so he tracked him down, took dead aim at him. Well, he got his vest back. Bro. Ben said Grandfather told of an Indian raid and following them to see where they hid or buried some gold they were said to have stolen. They did not find where, tho' it was generally supposed to have been buried on Uncle William Culpepper's place, near Rocky Creek. Ben said he and other boys had looked and dug for this gold many times without success of course Some years after Uncle William moved to Walnut Springs, Texas, Ben was back there disposing of the old Grandfather Culpepper homestead, as he and the man he sold to were passing Uncle William's place, that is the place he once owned, the man pointed to a pile of dirt and said, "there is where they found $6,000 in gold when they were digging a post-hole". So it was true about the Indians having buried it. After Grandfather's death in Oct. 1903, my father, B. F. Burke bought the ancestral home from the heirs, as mother had always lived there and wanted it. When I was growing up, after I could read well enough, Grandfather would call me and ask me to read the Bible to him. When asked where in the Bible he wanted me to read, he would say, "well read me something from Romans" or the acts of the Apostles, altho' the eighth chapter of Romans was his favorite. He was very religious, and was a member of the Primitive Baptist Church. He built a small church house several miles west of his home, known as Mt. Olive, and this was used as a school house also. Before the slaves were freed, they were allowed to attend church services and sit in the rear of the building. Once a month or once every three months, a Primitive Baptist preacher came to hold services Saturday and Sunday. He usually came to our house, (we lived in Grandfather's home), on Friday and then we had a service there that night. They sang, as the preacher would read out the lines from a hymnal, and then he would preach. We children would get sleepy, and mama would tell us to get up on Daddy's bed and go to sleep. Before the service was over, the bed was full of children. The next day, Saturday, there was an eleven o'clock service at the church-house, also on Sunday, but no night service those two days. The main event of the year was when they had an all day meeting, with dinner on the ground, as we called it then, and it was something to remember, with fried chicken, cakes and pies of all kinds, with jelly-cake leading all the rest as far as I was concerned. Every woman brought enough food to feed her own family, and many more. It was the best she knew how to prepare. In my minds eye, I can see the potato-salads with sliced boiled eggs on top, sometimes the egg yolks were served in designs on top. Every kind of homemade pickles, jellies and preserves and home made bread. There were no Bakeries in those days. Those were the "good-old days". In the summer time when it was meeting Sunday, and there was plenty of fresh corn and vegetables of all kinds also plenty of fryers, Daddy would invite as many of his friends and relatives as he wanted to for Sunday dinner, but my mother never knew how many until they all got there. Dinner lasted sometimes until four o'clock in the afternoon, and by that time we children were nearly starved, and there wasn't anything left of the fried chicken but necks and wings, but even that tasted pretty good as hungry as we were. One thing I wanted to mention in connection with the Primitive Baptist religion is that they believed in washing each others feet, as Jesus washed his Disciples feet, and this ceremony was observed religiously. My mother, being the youngest of sixteen children, naturally was the last one to get married, so when she and my father, Ben F. Burke married, they made their home with grandfather, and took care of him until his death, October 21st, 1903 at Old Sweet Home, Texas, at the age of 99 years, 8 months, and 21 days. He had seven sons and nine daughters. He had 366 grand children, great-grandchildren, and great-great-grandchildren, at the time of his death. His birthday was another "Red Letter day" in my memory, as mama and sister Mattie would start making cakes before hand in order to have enough for the crowds that came to help him celebrate his birthday which came on Jan. 31st. Of course the nieces and others brought food, and many brought cakes, of which grandfather was supposed to taste of each. He had many friends in the surrounding towns of Sweet Home, Shiner, & Hallettsville, who had standing invitations to eat Birthday dinner with him, but he seldom came to the table, as he was crippled. He had a kidney shaped lap-board that he always ate on. The reason he was crippled was, he had a stallion that he rode every day to keep him gentle, so when he saddled him one day in the summer of 1881 mama said she begged him not to ride him that day as he was so unruly, but Daddy said he was going to ride him, "or else" so he did, and he threw him and broke his leg between the ankle and knee, which proved to be a pretty bad break. This happened in the summer of 1881, before sister Mattie was born in September, and he lay in bed until she was old enough to walk. He was 78 years old then. He could never walk without a crutch and cane, 'tho he frequently pushed a chair in front of him, going from his bed to his chair. He sat in a certain rocking chair in the house by the side of the fire-place, and he was the one that told you when to mend the fire, but he seldom let you punch it with the poker, and to this day that is something I have always wanted to do. Grandfather was adverse to having his picture made, so the only picture he ever had made was made without his knowledge, and was made from a reflection in a cracked mirror, as the story goes. The finished picture, a tintype, proves this, as it is crackled all over. I have this picture, the only one in existence. Most all of Grandfathers sons and daughters had large families, but two excelled them all in numbers. Aunt Melvina Morris & Uncle Jordan, had twenty-one children, and Uncle Tom Culpepper had twenty-one by two wives. Uncle Jim Culpepper lived closer than any of the other relatives, and came to see Grandfather more often than any of the others, so I learned to love him very much, and to go home with him was one of the greatest joys of my life. Their home life was so sweet, and you never heard a cross word. Every one had certain chores to do and there never seemed to be any argument about who was to do this or that. For instance when a bale of cotton was sold, the money was brought and put in Aunt Maggie's lap, and she divided it out, so much for groceries, and so much to each of the sons who helped to plant and harvest it. The older girls milked the cows, made the butter, gathered the eggs and sold what wasn't needed at home and they too were given their part of this money. The youngest girl was Maggie, and she and I were great friends. The others were much older than I but I liked to be with them too, and at night at the supper table, after Aunt Maggie and Uncle Jim had gone back into the living room, we would sit around the table and talk for hours before we got up to wash the dishes. At Christmas time there was always a Christmas tree that reached from floor to ceiling, and there was a present for every one, no matter if they just happened in, Josephine would slip out, and come back with a gift. Christmas dinner was something to remember, and usually lasted until three or four o'clock, but so did the food. Always seemed to be plenty. Going back to the time Grandfather first came to Texas, and had slaves, my mother said she was rocked to sleep by her "black Mammy Nellie" until her feet touched the floor, and she never saw the sun rise until she was 12 years old. 
Reunion*24 Sep 2016 A reunion is held annually for the descendants of Francis Gillespie Culpepper. Last reported to Culpepper Connections! to be held 24 Sep 2016, with a meeting at 11:00 AM, lunch after the meeting, and a director's meeting after lunch. It is held at Kloesel's Steak House in Moulton, Lavaca County. For a small donation, which helps maintain the cemetery there, you can get a newsletter which will announce the exact date for the next reunion, give the minutes of the previous reunion, etc. For more information, contact Tom S. Culpepper (grandson of the Rev. Charles Lee Culpepper), 3807 Eagle Way, Round Rock, TX 78681-1669. Phone: (512) 255-0261 (home)
Tom keeps records on the descendants of Francis Gillespie Culpepper. If you attend the reunion, you can have a copy by bringing a thumb drive to the reunion with at least one gigabyte of memory.15 

Family 1

Martha Bales (circa 1805 - 23 Nov 1823)
Marriage*circa 1822 He married Martha Bales at Edgefield District, South Carolina, circa 1822. 

Family 2

Eglintine Langley (6 Apr 1810 - 3 Apr 1878)
Marriage*13 Jan 1825 He married Eglintine Langley on 13 Jan 1825 at age 20. 
Children
ChartsHenry Culpeper of Lower Norfolk: DNA Status Chart (Male only, 8 generations)
John Culpepper of Randolph Co, AL: Descendant Chart
Last Edited20 Aug 2016

Citations

  1. P 173 (John 1m 26-45 w/5m 0-10, 2m 10-16, 1f 0-10, 1f 16-26, 2f 26-45)
    p 173 Nancy (1 of 2 females 26-45 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Joel (1 of 2 males age 10-16 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 John J. (1 of 2 males age 10-16 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Daniel P. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Sarah O. (1 female 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Francis G. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 James I. J. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 George W. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper).
  2. 1810 Federal Census, United States.
    Columbia, Richland District, SC
    John Culpepper, page 173, 5 M0-10, 2 M10-16, 1 M26-45, 1 F0-10, 1 F16-26, 2 F26-45, 16 slaves.
  3. 1830 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 339, Duprees Twp, Talbot Co., GA
    Francis G. Culpepper, 1 M20-30, 3 F0-5 (sic), 1 F20-30.
  4. Tombstone.
    Stockdale City Cemetery, Stockdale, Wilson Co., TX
    James L. Culpepper, 28 Jul 1833 – 29 Aug 1922
    Margaret Culpepper, 14 Feb 1841, Coffeeville, Miss – 14 Apr 1931.
  5. 1840 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 179, Ancestry.com images 21-22, Unknown Township, Chambers Co., AL
    Francis Culpepper, 2 M0-5, 2 M5-10, 3 M10-15, 1 M30-40, 2 F0-5, 1 F5-10, 1 F30-40, 0 slaves.
  6. Correspondence from Charles Lee Culpepper, San Antonio, TX, to Lew Griffin.
  7. 1850 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 43, Family 290, Lines 12-25, (not stated) Lafayette Co, MS
    F. G. Culpepper, 46, M, Farmer, 100, SC
    Edlentine Culpepper, 38, F, SC
    William H (W) Culpepper, 21, M, Student, GA
    Martha A E Culpepper, 18, F, GA
    Jas L. Culpepper, 16, M, Student, GA
    Shadrack D. Culpepper, 14, M, SC
    Francis B. Culpepper, 13, M, AL
    Nancy R. Culpepper, 11, F, AL
    Matilda S. Culpepper, 10, F, AL
    Cynthia J. Culpepper, 8, F, AL
    Amanda Culpepper, 6, F, AL
    Mary J. Culpepper, 4, F, AL
    Melvina Culpepper, 3, F, AL
    Salina Culpepper, 1, F, MS.
  8. 1850 Federal Census, United States.
    Lafayette Co., MS
    F. G. Culpepper, owned 2 Black females, ages 30 and 6, and 1 Mulatto female, age 2.
  9. 1860 Federal Census, United States.
    Sheet 36, Pg 200B, (19 Jun 1860), Hallettesville PO, Lavaca Co., TX (Anc.com img# 36)
    Francis Culpepper, 56, M, SC, RE=$4500, PE=$3500, Farmer
    Egletine Culpepper, 50, F, SC
    Sarah Culpepper, 18, F, AL, Spinister
    Amanda Culpepper, 14, F, AL
    Mary Culpepper, 13, F, AL
    Melvina Culpepper, 12, F, MS
    Selina Culpepper, 11, F, MS
    Geo Ann Culpepper, 9, F, MS
    Shadrick Culpepper, 23, M, AL, Farm Laborer
    Sheet/Pg 9, Pg 061, (1 Slave House), (18 Jun 1860), Lavaca, Lavaca Co., TX (Anc.com img# 9)
    Slaves: 1 F40, 1 M20, 1 F12, 1 M6.
  10. 1870 Federal Census, United States.
    Sheet/Pg 134, Pg 473 (15 Jul 1870), Lavaca Co., TX
    Frank Culpepper, 66, M, SC, RE=$1500, PE=$1500, Farmer
    Egletine Culpepper, 60, F, SC
    Shadrick D. Culpepper, 36, M, GA
    Amanda Culpepper, 28, F, AL
    Georgia Culpepper, 19, F, MS
    Mattie Culpepper, 11, F, TX
    Nancy A. Culpepper, 9, F, TX
    Daniel F. Culpepper, 45, M, AL, Stock-Raiser
    John Holly, 22, M, MO, Works on Farm.
  11. 1880 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 79, Sheet 21, Pg 418A, Pct 3, Lavaca Co., TX
    Frank Culpepper, M, 76, Head, M, SC NC SC, Farmer
    Eglentine Culpepper, F, 70, Wife, M, SC SC SC
    Georgia Culpepper, F, 29, Dau, S, MS SC SC
    Henry Welch, M, 35, Laborer, S, IL IL IL.
  12. 1900 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 87, Sheet 2B, Pg 116A, Pct 3, Gen.com Img 4, Old Sweet Home, Lavaca Co., TX
    B. F. Burke, Head, M, Jun-1848, 61, md-19 yrs, AR Austria Austria, Farmer
    G. A. (Culpepper) Burke, Wife, F, Mar-1851, 49, md-19 yrs, Ch 5/5, MS NC NC
    Mattie Burke, Daughter, F, Sep-1881, 18, S, TX AR MS
    Richard Burke, Son, M, Feb-1883, 17, S, TX AR MS, Farm Laborer
    William Burke, Son, M, Feb-1885, 15, S, TX AR MS, Farm Laborer
    Benjamin Burke, Son, M, Sep-1886, 13, S, TX AR MS
    Jessie Burke, Son, M [actually a Daughter], Dec-1888, 11, S, TX AR MS
    F. G. Culpepper, Father-in-law, M, Jan-1803, Wid, NC [SC in all prev censuses] AR MS.
  13. Texas Department of Health, compiler, Texas Death Index, 1903-2000, Online database at Ancestry.com, 2006.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=4876
    Francis G. Culpepper died 21 Oct 1903 in Lavaca Co., TX, Cert 39857.
  14. Sammy Tise, Lavaca Co., TX - Cemetery Records, Hallettsville, TX: Sammy Tise.
    Vol I p 51.
  15. E-mail written 2003 - 2016 to Lew Griffin from Thomas Scott Culpepper, 3807 Eagle Way, Round Rock, TX 78681-1669, Phone (512) 255-0261, e-mail address.

Martha Bales

Female, #32063, (circa 1805 - 23 Nov 1823)
Birth*circa 1805 Martha was born at South Carolina circa 1805. 
Marriage*circa 1822 She married Francis Gillespie Culpepper at Edgefield District, South Carolina, circa 1822. 
Married Namecirca 1822  As of circa 1822, her married name was Culpepper. 
Death*23 Nov 1823 She died at Edgefield District, South Carolina, on 23 Nov 1823. 
Biography* The parents of Martha Bales are not known. There was a "John Bales" who was recorded in Lexington District, SC in 1820 with two females 10-16 years of age in his household. Possibly one of these was Martha. According to information which appeared in the 2 Feb 1898 Shiner Gazette in a biography of her husband, Francis G. Culpepper, Martha Bales "was thrown from a horse while out riding and fatally injured." They had no children.
      Martha's death was recorded in the "BIBLE FAMILY RECORD OF FRANCIS G. & EGLINTINE CULPEPPER": _________________________Wife of _________________________F. G. Culpepper _________________________(Martha Culpepper) _________________________Departed this life _________________________Nov. 23 1823. 

Family

Francis Gillespie Culpepper (31 Jan 1804 - 21 Oct 1903)
Last Edited27 Feb 2008

Eglintine Langley

Female, #32064, (6 Apr 1810 - 3 Apr 1878)
Birth*6 Apr 1810 Eglintine was born at South Carolina on 6 Apr 1810. Tombstone Apr 1810 but FG Culpepper Bible record had 'April 6 1804.' 
Marriage*13 Jan 1825 She married Francis Gillespie Culpepper on 13 Jan 1825 at age 14. 
Married Name13 Jan 1825  As of 13 Jan 1825, her married name was Culpepper. 
Birth of Son5 Dec 1825 Her son Daniel F. Culpepper was born on 5 Dec 1825 at Louina, Randolph Co., Alabama
Birth of Son9 Aug 1827 Her son John Thomas Jefferson Culpepper was born on 9 Aug 1827 at Louina, Randolph Co., Alabama
Birth of Son11 Mar 1829 Her son William R. Culpepper was born on 11 Mar 1829 at Talbot Co., Georgia
1830 Census1 Jun 1830 Eglintine was probably a free white female, age 20 and under 30, in Francis Gillespie Culpepper's household, on the 1830 Census at Talbot Co., Georgia. The enumerator recorded 3 Females 0-5 and no Male children. We believe this was an error and should have been recorded as 3 Males 0-5..1 
Birth of Son28 Jul 1830 Her son Joel W. Culpepper was born on 28 Jul 1830 at Talbot Co., Georgia
Birth of Son28 Jul 1833 Her son James Louis Culpepper was born on 28 Jul 1833 at Louina, Randolph Co., Alabama.2 
Birth of Son17 Oct 1834 Her son Shadrach Dixon Culpepper was born on 17 Oct 1834 at Chambers Co., Alabama
Birth of SonJan 1836 Her son Benjamin Francis Culpepper was born in Jan 1836 at Chambers Co., Alabama
1840 Census1 Jun 1840 Eglintine was probably a free white female, age 30 and under 40, in Francis Gillespie Culpepper's household, on the 1840 Census on 1 Jun 1840 at Chambers Co., Alabama.3 
Death of SonAug 1848 Her son Joel W. Culpepper died in Aug 1848. 
1850 Census1 Jun 1850 Eglintine, William, Martha, James, Shadrach, Benjamin, Nancy, Sarah, Cynthia, Amanda, Mary, Susan and Selena listed as a household member living with Francis Gillespie Culpepper on the 1850 Census on 1 Jun 1850 at Lafayette Co., Mississippi.4 
Death of Son24 Dec 1854 Her son Benjamin Francis Culpepper died on 24 Dec 1854 at Lavaca Co., Texas
1860 Census1 Jun 1860 Eglintine, Sarah, Amanda, Mary, Susan, Selena, Georgia and Shadrach listed as a household member living with Francis Gillespie Culpepper in the 1860 Census at Lavaca Co., Texas.5 
1870 Census1 Jun 1870 Eglintine, Shadrach, Amanda, Georgia, Daniel, Martha and Mary listed as a household member living with Francis Gillespie Culpepper on the 1870 Census at Lavaca Co., Texas.6 
Death*3 Apr 1878 She died at Lavaca Co., Texas, on 3 Apr 1878 at age 67
from tombstone, but see 1880 census. 
Burial*circa 5 Apr 1878 Her body was interred circa 5 Apr 1878 at Mount Olive Cemetery, Lavaca Co., Texas
Biography* The "BIBLE FAMILY RECORD OF FRANCIS G. & EGLINTINE CULPEPPER" listed the following birth record: _________________________Eglintine Culpepper _________________________Born April 6 1804 Francis Gillespie was also born in 1804 but there is a question that this was Eglintine's year of birth. Based on an age of 50 in the 1860 census, an age of 60 in the 1870 census, Eglintine was probably born in 1810. However in the 1850 census, which is the earliest to record her by name, Eglintine was listed as being 38 years old, suggesting she was born in 1812.
.
      There is a question about the parents of Eglintine Langley. Francis G. Culpepper's father, John Culpepper, was living next to a Josiah Langley in Edgefield District, SC and John sold land to Josiah in 1823.
.
Mrs. Charley (Cleone Walker) Langley wrote of her Langley research in an 8 Jan 1979 letter: Josiah Langley lived in Edgecombe Co. No. Car. (1790). He had in his household some of his brothers and a sister (I think his brother was James Langley a Rev. War Soldier) and Josiah took care of his brothers and a sister after his parents died.
.
By 1800, Josiah wasn't in No. Car. Census but we find him in Edgefield Dist. So. Car. with two males in his home over 26 yrs old. (He [Josiah] was possibly one and his brother David was the other one.)
.
In the 1790 Census of Edgefield District So. Car. was an Isham Langley with four sons (I read that he left with his family and went to Kentucky or Tenn.) Isham may have been a brother to Josiah's father or some relative.
.
By 1810 we find that David, the brother of Josiah had married and there was also a William Langley in the Census, married with a family of small children.
.
An earlier account of the land records showed where an Osey Langley had received land from Josiah in 1798 and it was recorded in 1801. This Osey could have been Josiah's brother. He had to be 21 years old by 1798 in order to own property so he could have been born around 1776 or before. The 1800 or 1810 census didn't show an Osey Langley. He could have been living with another family or living in Geo. waiting for the Land Lottery.
.
In the 1820 Census William has moved and only Josiah and David are listed.
.
By 1822, David Langley leaves a will naming Josiah as his executor and as "My brother Josiah Langley." Among his children is one named Manning Langley....
.
Monroe Co. Geo. was formulated in the 1821 Land Lottery of Geo. The marriage records of Monroe Co. Geo. show that Osey Langley married Sarah Hardy 8? Feb 1827. William and Isaac Langley also marry in the same period of time.
.
Then I examined the Tax Digest. This is a list of those who have to pay a poll tax on their land. I found two William's, three Isaac's & two Osey Langley's.
.
Then by 1830 William and his family and Osey and his family are in Talbot Co. GA.
.
By 1828 Josiah Langley dies in Edgefield District So. Car. and names William Langley as his son.
.
The Superior and Petite Courts (Talbot Co.) show that William, Osey, Hampton and Whitfield Langley served on their juries from 1830 to 1838.
.
The 1830 Census shows that this William and his wife (also the 1840 Census) were born around 1775.
.
By 1840 Osey has moved to Tallapoosa Co. Alabama and William and his family are living in Chambers Co. Ala. where James Langley the Rev. Soldier is now residing.
.
By 1850 William and his family are gone, I don't know where [MS with FGC?] Osey is now living in Tuscaloosa Co. Ala. Whitfield and Isaac Langley are in Tallapoosa and Manning Langley the son of David is also there....
.
In the 1860 census we find Osey still in Tuscaloosa Co. [&] Sarah Hardy Langley the wife of Osey... with his married children living close to each other. Among them is one Eli Langley age 94 and his wife Elizabeth also in the 90's. He said he was born in Geo. I have not been able to find this man in any previous censuses.... Then also there was a Charles R. Brittain with his wife Ann L. several children and a daughter Eglentine and at the end of a list of children was a woman age 77 born N. C. Mary A. Langley....
.
[In] the 1870 census [of Tuscaloosa Co., AL]... the Brittain family is still there but Mary A. Langley is not listed.
.
And this ends the notes from Mrs. Charley (Cleone Walker) Langley.
.
Mrs. James L. (Vivian Hastings) Culpepper wrote 6 Jul 1979 that Eglintine was not mentioned in the will of either Jacob or David Langley.
.
Mrs. Charley (Cleone Walker) Langley on a 2 July 1979 pedigree chart listed her husband as a descendant of Osey Langley who was born about 1807 in South Carolina and who married in 1827 in Monroe Co., GA. Mrs. Langley listed Osey's parents as William Langley ? and Mary A. Anglin.
.
The John Culpepper family was also from South Carolina and has been shown in deed records to have been in Monroe Co., GA by 1827. In addition to the parallel moves of the two families, the name Mary Anglin is intesting. If this was Eglintine's mother is it possible that her name was meant to be Anglintine Langley?
.
In a 22 Feb 1979 letter Mrs. Charley Langley gave her reasoning for thinking that William Langley was Osey Langley's (and potentially Eglintine's) father: Osey was with William when Osey married in Monroe Co. Geo....
.
When Osey was born James [Langley] in his statement of where he lived and when was not in So. Car. and Osey was born in that State.... Wm was in So Car at that time....
.
      A 60 year old "Egletine" was listed (p. 473 #873) in the 1870 Lavaca Co., TX census in the household of Frank Culpepper. Her place of birth was given as South Carolina.
.
There was a reference to Eglentine in an article about her husband, Francis G. Culpepper, in the Shiner Gazette Lavaca Co., TX of Wednesday, 2 Feb 1898: In 1825 Mr. Culpepper was again married, this time to Miss Agaltine Langley, by whom he had sixteen children. His second marriage took place in Georgia, where he had removed in 1823.... His wife died in 1878 and he has since resided with his youngest daughter, Mrs. B. F. [Georgia Culpepper] Burke....
.
      The "BIBLE FAMILY RECORD OF FRANCIS G. & EGLINTINE CULPEPPER" listed a death record for Eglintine: _________________________2nd Wife of _________________________F. G. Culpepper _________________________(Eglintine Culpepper) _________________________Departed this life _________________________April 3rd 1878.
      In addition, on a 30 Sep 1893 Indian War survivor pension application, Francis G. Culpepper swore that his wife had died "the 3rd day of April, A. D. 1878" and this statement was witnessed by their son J. T. J. Culpepper. The 2 Feb 1898 Shiner Gazette article about Francis Gillespie Culpepper also recorded his wife's death in 1878 and finally the 3 Apr 1878 date was recorded on the tombstone.
.
The problem is that a 70 year "Eglentinie" was listed (pct 3 ED 79 p. 21 #150) with her husband and youngest daughter, Georgia, in the 1880 Lavaca Co., TX census. She was listed as having been born in South Carolina as were her parents. Mrs. T. D. (Patty Bennett) McGinty noted in a 25 Jul 1988 letter: I believe the stone mason goofed when he carved the stone and someone copied it into the Bible wrong or just the opposite but Eglantine definitely was alive in 1880 [recorded in 1880 census]. Ergo, her death date was probably 1887.
      Lynn C. Mauldin gave the death date as "April 3, 1888" but no source was cited. But it is hard to believe that the five sources, including two sworn statements, are all wrong about Eglintine's death. One possibility is that since census takers were paid by the head, the census taker might have known the family well enough to add one to his head count. Another possibility is that there was a misunderstanding of a question about Francis G. Culpepper's wife and information was provided without the census taker realizing the woman was deceased.
      Eglintine is buried in Mt. Olive Cemetery in Lavaca Co., TX and according to Mrs. Travis (Jacqueline Lorenz) McClinton the following information is on her tombstone: _________________________Eglatine Culpepper _________________________April 1810 _________________________April 3, 1878
      The following record is from p. 52 of Lavaca Co., TX - Cemetery Records Vol. I by Sammy Tise: CULPEPPER, Eglentine_____Apr 1810_____3 Apr 1878
.
Source: church minutes reproduced in They Tarried in Taylor by Essie Jones Childs, page 21.
.
Eglentine Culpepper was on a list of Bethel Baptist Church members. It indicates that the membership was established in 1829. Bethel Baptist Church was constituted in Talbot County, GA on 4-12-1828. This portion of Talbot County later became Taylor Co. The church later became known as Horeb Baptist Church.
Also on this list:
.
Langly, Hampton 1828
      Martha 1828
      William 1828
      Ovesy? 1829
      James Riley 1835
.
The year after name is the year the individual became a member.
 
1880 Census1 Jun 1880 Eglintine was listed as Francis Gillespie Culpepper's wife on the 1880 Census at Lavaca Co., Texas.7 
Research note*May 2008 Dwayne,
I was interested to hear that William B. Knox was a founding member of Mount Pisgah Baptist Church in Chambers County, Alabama. That probably means that Francis G. Culpepper was a member of that church as well. I'd bet that over time we could piece together quite a few of the families who were in that colony that went to Texas with Frank Culpepper. There were no Knox's buried in this cemetery, nor in any other recorded cemetery in Chambers. But I do see a number of other familiar names there, possibly some who might have been related to Francis G. Culpepper's wife, Eglantine Langley, such as Rev. War Soldier James Langley and various early Anglins.
Lew
-----Original Message-----
From: Dwayne Knox [mailto:dwayne@ritternet.com]
Sent: Saturday, May 31, 2008 6:03 AM
To: Lew Griffin
Subject: Re: old family legend?

Lew,

William B. Knox followed Francis Culpepper from Alabama to Texas. They were both in Chambers County Alabama, both his son John Hugh and Cynthia Jane Culpepper were born in Chambers County. William is on the 1840 census there, (with nine children) and is listed as a founding member of the Mt Pisgah Baptist church there. 
Research note*13 Dec 2008 Sent: Saturday, December 13, 2008 5:52 PM
To: Warren Culpepper
Subject: Culpepper Family Tree - Page No. 32064

Hi. I have been looking at your website, especially the page of Eglentine Langley. You mention several Langleys who were in Monroe Co., Georgia in the 1820’s. I am looking for the parents of my 3g-grandfather, Isaiah Langley, who was born in South Carolina in 1809. He married Caroline Calloway in Monroe Co., GA in 1833. Do you have any information on an Isaiah Langley? The father of Whitfield Langley was an Isaiah Langley, but this Isaiah was not old enough to be my Isaiah’s father. I would appreciate any help you can give me.

Thanks,
Virginia
www.barlowfamily.com.8 

Family

Francis Gillespie Culpepper (31 Jan 1804 - 21 Oct 1903)
Marriage*13 Jan 1825 She married Francis Gillespie Culpepper on 13 Jan 1825 at age 14. 
Children
Last Edited25 Feb 2009

Citations

  1. 1830 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 339, Duprees Twp, Talbot Co., GA
    Francis G. Culpepper, 1 M20-30, 3 F0-5 (sic), 1 F20-30.
  2. Tombstone.
    Stockdale City Cemetery, Stockdale, Wilson Co., TX
    James L. Culpepper, 28 Jul 1833 – 29 Aug 1922
    Margaret Culpepper, 14 Feb 1841, Coffeeville, Miss – 14 Apr 1931.
  3. 1840 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 179, Ancestry.com images 21-22, Unknown Township, Chambers Co., AL
    Francis Culpepper, 2 M0-5, 2 M5-10, 3 M10-15, 1 M30-40, 2 F0-5, 1 F5-10, 1 F30-40, 0 slaves.
  4. 1850 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 43, Family 290, Lines 12-25, (not stated) Lafayette Co, MS
    F. G. Culpepper, 46, M, Farmer, 100, SC
    Edlentine Culpepper, 38, F, SC
    William H (W) Culpepper, 21, M, Student, GA
    Martha A E Culpepper, 18, F, GA
    Jas L. Culpepper, 16, M, Student, GA
    Shadrack D. Culpepper, 14, M, SC
    Francis B. Culpepper, 13, M, AL
    Nancy R. Culpepper, 11, F, AL
    Matilda S. Culpepper, 10, F, AL
    Cynthia J. Culpepper, 8, F, AL
    Amanda Culpepper, 6, F, AL
    Mary J. Culpepper, 4, F, AL
    Melvina Culpepper, 3, F, AL
    Salina Culpepper, 1, F, MS.
  5. 1860 Federal Census, United States.
    Sheet 36, Pg 200B, (19 Jun 1860), Hallettesville PO, Lavaca Co., TX (Anc.com img# 36)
    Francis Culpepper, 56, M, SC, RE=$4500, PE=$3500, Farmer
    Egletine Culpepper, 50, F, SC
    Sarah Culpepper, 18, F, AL, Spinister
    Amanda Culpepper, 14, F, AL
    Mary Culpepper, 13, F, AL
    Melvina Culpepper, 12, F, MS
    Selina Culpepper, 11, F, MS
    Geo Ann Culpepper, 9, F, MS
    Shadrick Culpepper, 23, M, AL, Farm Laborer
    Sheet/Pg 9, Pg 061, (1 Slave House), (18 Jun 1860), Lavaca, Lavaca Co., TX (Anc.com img# 9)
    Slaves: 1 F40, 1 M20, 1 F12, 1 M6.
  6. 1870 Federal Census, United States.
    Sheet/Pg 134, Pg 473 (15 Jul 1870), Lavaca Co., TX
    Frank Culpepper, 66, M, SC, RE=$1500, PE=$1500, Farmer
    Egletine Culpepper, 60, F, SC
    Shadrick D. Culpepper, 36, M, GA
    Amanda Culpepper, 28, F, AL
    Georgia Culpepper, 19, F, MS
    Mattie Culpepper, 11, F, TX
    Nancy A. Culpepper, 9, F, TX
    Daniel F. Culpepper, 45, M, AL, Stock-Raiser
    John Holly, 22, M, MO, Works on Farm.
  7. 1880 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 79, Sheet 21, Pg 418A, Pct 3, Lavaca Co., TX
    Frank Culpepper, M, 76, Head, M, SC NC SC, Farmer
    Eglentine Culpepper, F, 70, Wife, M, SC SC SC
    Georgia Culpepper, F, 29, Dau, S, MS SC SC
    Henry Welch, M, 35, Laborer, S, IL IL IL.
  8. E-mail written Dec 2008 to Lew Griffin from Virginia, e-mail address.

James I. J. Culpepper

Male, #32065, (3 Jun 1806 - 15 Oct 1846)
Father*John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL (1 Oct 1772 - 13 May 1855)
Mother*Nancy Gillespie (c 1778 - 25 Jul 1848)
DNA* James has been proven by DNA and genealogical research to be a descendant of Joseph Culpepper of Edgecombe Co., NC, who is a son of Robert Culpepper of Lower Norfolk, the son of Henry Culpepper of Lower Norfolk, VA. 
Birth*3 Jun 1806 James was born at Lexington District, South Carolina, on 3 Jun 1806. 
1810 Census6 Aug 1810 Daniel, Francis, James and George was probably a free white male, age under 10, in John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL's household on the 1810 Census at Richland District, South Carolina. Unaccounted for are 1 male 0-10 and 1 female 16-26..1,2 
Marriage License20 Dec 1828 James applied for a marriage license to wed Martha Byne Blackstone at Crawford Co., Georgia, on 20 Dec 1828. 
Marriage*21 Dec 1828 He married Martha Byne Blackstone at Crawford Co., Georgia, on 21 Dec 1828 at age 22.3 
1830 Census*1 Jun 1830 James was listed as the head of a family on the 1830 Census at Crawford Co., Georgia. Unaccounted for is 1 M0-5.4 
Land Lottery*1832 He had a fortunate draw in the land lottery in 1832 at Crawford Co., Georgia,
lot 1133/20/3 in what became Paulding Co., GA.5 
Birth of Soncirca 1834 His son John G. Culpepper was born circa 1834 at Crawford Co., Georgia
Birth of Sonbetween 1830 and 1840 His son William Culpepper was born between 1830 and 1840. 
Indian Wars*1836 He served in one of the Creek and Seminole Indian Wars in 1836
(Served in Captain Dudley’s Company, Georgia Volunteers, Second Creek Indian War.)6 
Birth of Soncirca 1836 His son George Washington Culpepper was born circa 1836 at Chambers Co., Alabama.7 
Birth of Soncirca 1839 His son Nathan F. Culpepper was born circa 1839 at Chambers Co., Alabama
Mexican War*1846 He served in the US War with Mexico in 1846.8 
Death*15 Oct 1846 He died at Coosa Co., Alabama, on 15 Oct 1846 at age 40. 
Biography*  Mrs. J. W. (Ira Gay) Deam of Gay, GA a descendant of Joel Culpepper, John Culpepper's oldest son, preserved the record of James Culpepper's birth and death from the John Culpepper Bible and Mrs. D. W. (Lavyn Wright) Sisco transcribed the record as follows: _________________________James L. Culpepper _________________________b. 3 Jun 1806 _________________________On Tuesday about Midnight _________________________d. October 16, 1846
      On the marriage certificate which was submitted by his widow in order to get a pension, the middle initial appears to be an "I." And in her 24 Aug 1897 application for a Mexican War pension, James' widow, Martha B. (Blackstone) Culpepper, wrote: I am the widow of James J. Culpepper, who served under the name James I. Culpepper....
      However in a 12 Feb 1887 application Martha specified that James had served under the name James J. Culpepper. It seems likely that Mrs. Deam read the middle initial in the Bible record as a lower case "l." instead of an uppercase "I" but four documents in different handwriting in the pension file clearly show that the middle initial was an "I." However census, deed, and service records and his widow refer to James as James J. Culpepper. Perhaps James had three names or perhaps he didn't like his middle name and used another. A great-grandnephew was named "James Inman Carlisle" in 1869. This MIGHT have been James Culpepper's middle name as well.
      James' parents were recorded in the 1800 census of Lexington District, SC and this is probably where he was born. However, James' father, John Culpepper, is next noted administering the estate of John's presumed grandfather-in-law, Daniel Peek, in Richland District in 1807 and James' parents are noted living in Richland District in the 1810 census. So, depending on when the family moved to Richland District, it is possible that this was James' place of birth. James was noted living with his parents as one of five males 0-10 years of age in the 1810 census of Richland District, SC. Unfortunately, his parents have not been found in the 1820 census of South Carolina or Georgia but the family is presumed to have been living in Edgefield District since this was where James' father, John Culpepper, sold the land "where I now live" in 1823. Shortly after this, James presumably moved with his parents to Georgia where his father, John Culpepper "of Monroe" county is known to have purchased land in 1827.
      James found his way to Crawford Co., GA, by 1830 possibly moving with his older brother, Joel, who was recorded there in the 1830 census. There James married and is noted with a wife and child in the 1830 census. As a married man with children who was a U. S. citizen and a resident of Georgia for at least three years James would have been eligible for two draws in the 1832 Gold Lottery of Georgia. He drew lot 1133 in district 20 of section 3. This would have been a 40 acre lot near the southwest corner of Paulding Co., GA where it connects with Carroll Co., GA. It is not known if he ever mined the land or if he sold it. According to the Indian War pension application (#2073, no certificate) by James' widow, James was in Alabama by 1836, possibly having moved there with his older brother, Francis G. Culpepper, and his family. Both brother's are supposed to have taken part in the Creek War. The following is the pension application of James' widow: INDIAN WAR PENSIONS. - Act of July 27, 1892. DECLARATION OF WIDOW FOR PENSION. State of Georgia, County of Muscogee, ss:
      ON THIS 29 day of August, A. D. one thousand eight hundred and ninety 2 personally appeared before me J. C. Cook Clerk Supr Crt within and for the County and State aforesaid, Martha B. Culpepper aged 78 years, a resident of Columbus in the County of Muscogee in the State of Georgia who being by me first duly sworn according to law, deposes and says:
      I am the widow of Jas J Culpepper, who served under the name of Jas. J. Culpepper, as a private in the Company commanded by Captain Dudley in the _____ regiment of Ga Mil Vols., commanded by Col._________ in the war with Creed Indians in the year 1836. I think he served along the Chattahoochee river in Ga & Ala, and probably down into Florida. That my said husband enlisted at Dudleyville Ala, on or about the ___-___ day of May, A. D. 1836, for the term of months that I was married under my name of Martha B. Blackstone to my said husband by John Neal M. G. on or about the 21 day of Decbr A. D. 1828 at Crawford Co GA, in the State of Georgia, and lived with my said husband from the date of my said marriage until the day of his death, to wit: the 15th day of October, A. D. 1846, when my said husband died at Coosa Co. in the State of Alabama, and that I have not since remarried; that there was never any legal impediment to said marriage.
      No. 1. That my said husband, being duly enlisted, as aforesaid, actually served thirty days with the Army of the United States, in the war aforesaid, which service was as follows: Guarding the frontier against the approach of the Creek Indians, and his frequent skirmishing & fighting with said Indians and was honorably discharged at __________________ on the _________ day of _____________ A. D. 1836
      No. 2. That my husband was personally named in a resolution of Congress for a specific service in said war, to wit: In the resolution of the Dont Know about it day of _______________, A. D. _____, and was honorably discharged at Dont remember. on the _____ day of refer to records.
      No. 3. That I am 78 years of age, and that I was born on or about the 28th day of Sept A. D. 1814, at ____________________, in the State of ____________________
      That I have _____________ heretofore made application for pension or bounty-land, which said claim is No. 66.974 which B. L. Warrant was issued in my name about the year 1857. And that I also made an application for pension on account of death of my husband which resulted from gunshot wound rec'd in Mexico, which claim was rejected. Also she made application for pension under Act Jany 29 1887, rejected.
      That in support and proof of my right to pension, I tender herewith, under the regulations prescribed by the Secretary of the Interior, the following evidence: The rolls of Capt. Dudleys Company Ga Militia Vols war with Creek Indians in year 1836, which record is in the War Dept. Washington D. C. Also the evidence now on file in the Pension office relative to marriage, death, &c of soldier to Claimant. And the affidavits of Geo. W. Gordon, Esq, Hon Flynn Hargett Sr. et al all of whom have known me a long time.
      That since the death of my said husband I have resided at the following places, to wit: Rockford Coosa Co Ala, Harris Co Ga and now Columbus, Muscogee Co, Georgia.
      That I make this declaration for the purpose of being placed on the pension roll of the United States under the provisions of the Act of July 27th, 1892.
      And I hereby appoint, with full power of substitution and revocation, Flynn Hargett, Jr. of Hardeman Ga my true and lawful attorney, to prosecute my claim.
      My Post Office address is Columbus, Ga. /s/_R._S._Wilson________________/s/_Martha B Culpepper /s/_John W. Riddle State of Georgia, County of Muscogee, ss:
      Before me, a Clerk Supr Crt in and for the County and State aforesaid, on this 29th day of August A. D. 1892, personally appeared Martha B. Culpepper known to me as the person described in, and who executed and signed the foregoing declaration for pension, as widow of Jas. J. Culpepper, and whom I certify to be a credible person and of good repute for truth and veracity in the community in which she lives, who being by me first duly sworn, deposes and says that she has read (if claimant cannot read, read to her and so state in acknowledgement) the foregoing declaration and knows the contents thereof, and that all of the facts therein stated are true. ________________________________/s/_Jno_C_Cook_Clerk ________________________________________S_C_M_C Ga.
      On the cover of the application, it was noted that James J. Culpepper enlisted "May 1836" and was discharged at the "Close of War 1836." In an affidavit supporting the application, Geo. W. Gordon and Hattie E. Gordon noted that they had known Martha for 30+ years and: have lived near her and have heard her speak very ofter about her said deceased husband, Jas J. Culpepper, and his service in the Indian War, and also of his service in the War with Mexico. Affiants say that they never knew said Jas J. Culpepper, personally, but have heard said Martha B - say that he died in the County of Coosa and state of Ala. about the year 1846; and from their acquaintance with her they fully believe what they have heard her say about his death. Affiants further say that since they have known the said Martha B. Culpepper she has been a widow and for most all the time, or quite all the time, in very dependent circumstances; that claimant is now about 79 years old and her physical condition is very precarious and that they believe her pension claim is meritorious and should be made Special, placed on the completed files and adjudicated at the earliest day possible....
      James has not been found in an 1840 U. S. census but presumably was living in Alabama since this where he enlisted to fight in the Mexican War in 1846. James' widow filed three pension applications which appear to be based on James' death in the Mexican War. The first application appears to be a generic widow's request for a pension: Widow's Declaration for Pension or Increase of Pension. This must be Executed before a Court of Record or some Officer thereof having Custody of the Seal. State of Georgia, County of Harris, ss
      ON THIS 22 day of September A. D., one thousand eight hundred and eighty 6 personally appeared before me a Notary Public of the Exofficio J. P. a Court of Record within and for the County and State aforesaid Martha B. Culpepper aged 72 years, who, being duly sworn according to law, makes the following declaration in order to obtain the Pension provided by Acts of Congress granting pension to widows: That she is the widow of James J. Culpepper, who Volr [volunteered] under the name of Jas J Culpepper at Mobile, Ala., on the _____ day of June A. D., 18 46 in Capt. Dennis' Co. Talladega Rangers, in the war of 1846-1848 who rec'd a most severe gunshot wound in his left hip while in a battle or skirmish at or near Buena Vista; on a/c [account?] of which, together from exposure & hardships endured while on the March, &tc he died on the 15 day of [September crossed through and written over by] October Oct., A. D. 1846, who bore at the time of his death the rank of private in the service aforesaid; that she was married under the name of M. B. Blackstone to said James J. Culpepper on the 21 day of December A. D. 18 28 by Rev. Jnoathan Neal at Crawford Co Ga there being no legal barrier to such marriage; that neither she nor her husband had been previously married (if either have been previously married so state, and give date of death or divorce of former spouse.) ________________ that she has to present date remained his widow; that the following are the names and dates of birth of all his legitimate children yet surviving who were under sixteen years of age at father's death, viz: __________ of soldier by __________, born _______ 18 __ __________ of soldier by __________, born _______ 18 __ __________ of soldier by __________, born _______ 18 __ __________ of soldier by __________, born _______ 18 __ __________ of soldier by __________, born _______ 18 __ __________ of soldier by __________, born _______ 18 __ __________ of soldier by __________, born _______ 18 __ __________ of soldier by __________, born _______ 18 __ That she has not abandoned the support of any one of her children, but that they are still under her care or maintenance. Only two of my children living. They are not under my care as both are married that she has not in any manner engaged in, or aided or abetted, the rebellion in the United States, that no prior application has been filed for a pension on account of soldier death; but that a bounty land warrant has been granted in her name, No. #66.974 that she hereby appoints, with full power of substitution and revocation Flynn Hargett, Jr. of Hardeman, Ga. her attorney to prosecute the above claim; that her residence is No. __________ street __________ and her Post Office address is Mulberry Grove, Harris Co. Ga. /s/_J_H_Reese___________________/s/_Martha B. Culpepper /s/_J._H._Beers
      Also personally appeared J H Reese, residing at near Mulberry Grove Ga, and J H Beers residing at near Mulberry Grove Ga, persons whom I certify to be respectable and entitled to credit, and who, being by me duly sworn, say that they were present and saw Mrs. Martha B. Culpepper, the claimant sign her name (make her mark) to the foregoing declaration; that they have every reason to believe from the appearance of said claimant and their acquaintance with her that she is the identical person she represents herself to be; and that they have no interest in the prosecution of this claim. ________________________________/s/_J._H._Reese ________________________________/s/_J._H._Beers
      Sworn to and subscribed before me this 22 day of September A. D. 188 6 and I hereby certify that the contents of the above declaration, &tc., were fully made known and explained to the applicant and witnesses before swearing, including the words "Sept." erased, and the words "15" Oct", added; and that I have no interest, direct or indirect in the prosecution of this claim. ________________________________/s/_G_W_Gordon ________________________________Notary_Public_Exof_J.P.
      In response to an 11 Dec 1886 request from the Department of the Interior, Pension Office for James J. Culpepper's service record, the War Department returned the following: War Department _____ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, __________Washington, Mch 4, 188 7
      Respectfully returned to the Commissioner of Pensions.
James J Culpepper, a Private of Capt Sumeral Dennis's Company Col Withers Regiment Ala Mex War Volunteers, was enroled on the 2d day of June 18 46, at Mobile for 6 months. He was mustered out June 16" 1846 a Private. Period of service 15 days. Books of organization are not on file. ________________________________/s/_A_C_Drum ________________________________Adjutant General
      The next pension application followed a few months after the first using a form specifically related to the Mexican War: MEXICAN WAR. CLAIM OF WIDOW FOR PENSION.

      This must be Executed before a Court of Record or some officer thereof having Custody of the Seal. State of Georgia, County of Harris, ss.
      ON THIS 12th
day of February, A. D. one thousand eight hundred and eighty 7 personally appeared before me ____________________, the same being a Court of Record within and for the County and State aforesaid, (1) Martha B. Culpepper aged 72 years, a resident of Mulberry Grove in the State of Georgia who being duly sworn according to law, declares that she is the widow of (2) James J. Culpepper deceased, who was the identical (3) Jas. J. Culpepper who served under the name of (4) Jas J. Culpepper as a (5) private in the Company commanded by Captain Dennis Ala, Regiment of Vol commanded by __________________ in the war with Mexico, that her said husband (6) Vol[untee]r[ed] at Mobile, Ala. on or about the ________ day June A. D. 1846 for the term of 6 mos and continued in actual serivce in said war for the term of (7) mos, and whose services terminated by reason of (8) honorable discharge on the ______ day of ___________ A. D. 1846. She further states that the following is a full description of her said husband at the time of his enlistment, viz: 9 height 5 feet 9 inches, complexion, dark; eyes, blue; hair, black. She further states that she was married to the said Jas J Culpepper at the city (or town) of Knoxville in the county of Crawford and in the State of Ga. on the 21 day Decber A. D. 1828 by one (10) Jno. Neal who was a (11) Minister of Gospel and that her name before her said marriage was Martha B. Blackstone and that she has not remarried since the death of said soldier; and she further states that (12) neither herself nor her said husband had been previously married and she further declares that she is [space for specifying disability, etc.] (if claimant is over sixty-two years of age, this space need not be filled.) and that her said husband (13) James J. Culpepper died at Rockford in the State of Ala. on the 15th day of Octo A. D. 1846 and she further declares that the following have been places of residence of herself and her said husband since the date of his discharge from the army, viz: (14) In Coosa Co., Ala; and the claimant since her husband's death, has resided near Mulberry Grove, Harris Co. Ga. She makes this declaration for the purpose of obtaining the Pension to which she may be entitled under the provisions of any act of Congress granting pensions to widows of Menican War soldiers, and hereby constitutes and appoints, with full power of substitution and revocation Flynn Hargett Jr. of Hardeman, Georgia her true and lawful attorney to prosecute her claim. And she further declares that she heretofore made an application for (15) bounty land & obtained one #66.974. The claim for pension, on account of death of her said husband from wound rec'd &c, is pending. and that her residence is No. ___________ Street, City (or Town) of ______________ County of Harris State of Georgia and that her post-office address is Mulberry Grove, Ga. /s/_S._J._Foster________________/s/_Martha B. Culpepper /s/_J_M_Huling
      Also personally appeared S. J. Foster, aged 33 years, residing at No. Mulberry Grove street, in Ga., and James M Huling aged 27 years, residing at No. Mulberry Grove street, in Georgia, persons whom I certify to be respectable and entitled to credit, and who being by me duly sworn, say that they have know the said Martha J. Culpepper for 15 years and for 12 years respectively; that they were present and saw her sign her name (or make her mark) to the foregoing declaration; that they have every reason to believe, from the appearance of said claimant and their acquaintance with her, that she is the identical person she represents herself to be; and they further say that they are able to identify her as the person who was the wife of the identical (16) Jas. J. Culpepper who rendered the service alleged in the above application (in the company of Captain Dennis in the regiment of Ala. Vols in the war with Mexico) by the following named facts and circumstances, viz: (17) That Mrs. Culpepper swears to the facts & we know her to be a person of veracity and eminently worthy of belief and that they have no interest in the prosecution of this claim. /s/_S._J._Foster________________/s/_S._J._Foster ________________________________/s/_J._M._Huling
      Sworn to and subscribed before me this 12th day of February A. D. 188 7 and I hereby certify that the contents of the above declaration, &c., were fully made known and explained to the applicant and witnesses before swearing, including the words _______________ erased, and the words _______________, added; and that I have no interest, direct or indirect in the prosecution of this claim. ________________________________/s/_A._J._Truett _____________Clerk of the Superior Court Harris Co.
      Affidavits supporting this application include one from neighbors A. L. Moon and L. C. Hargett, Jr. who swore that that they had known Martha for 30+ years and: They have Known the said Martha B Culpepper for the space of time above mentioned & have lived neighbors to her; have known her to visit relatives in Ala. where she & her husband lived prior to his death; have seen an affidavit from a person in Crawford Co. Ga. stating that the records there showed that Martha B. Blackstone and J. J. Culpepper were duly & legally married; They state further that they have seen a letter which was written by Jas J. Culpepper under date of June 11th 1846 from Mobile, Ala, and addressed to Martha B. Culpepper, his wife, which letter stated that his company had just been mustered into service &c. They further state that they have known persons visiting this County from Ala. Mrs. Culpepper's former home, identify recognize her as the widow of Jas J. Culpepper. They state further that the Dept of the Interior (Pension Office) has granted to M. B. Culpepper a B. L. Warrant No. 66.974 & there is no doubt of her identity.
      Two other witnesses, S. J. Foster and J. M. Huling signed an affidavit which added information about the land Martha had received: Which warrant was for 160 acres land. Act Mar 3d 1855, No. 66.974 and issued June 9" 1857. They state further that they have learned from claimant & other reliable authority that claimant move an unknown date from Ala. to Harris Co Ga, in 185-, and that she has lived here ever since....
      It is interesting to note that Martha received land for her husband's service before the Civil War but does not appear to have been able to get a widow's pension after the Civil War. Martha made a final appeal (#455, rejected) for a pension in 1897: MEXICAN WAR PENSION.--Act of January 29, A. D. 1887. DECLARATION OF WIDOW FOR PENSION. State of Georgia, County of Muscogee, ss:
      ON THIS
24 day of August, A. D. one thousand eight hundred and ninety 7, personally appeared before me, clerk of the Superior Court of Said County the same being a court of record in the State of Columbus in the County of Muscogee in the State of Georgia who, being by me first duly sworn according to law, deposes and says: I am the widow of James J. Culpepper, who served under the name of James I. Culpepper, as a private in the Company commanded by Captain Dennis in the ______ regiment of ______________, commanded by ______________ in the war with Mexico; that my said husband enlisted at Mobile Ala. on or about the _________ day of June 1846, A. D. ______, for the term of six months; that I was married under my name of Martha B. Blackstone to my said husband, by Jonothan Neal a minister on or about the 21 day of December A. D. 1828 at Crawford County Ga, in the State of Georgia, and lived with my said husband from the date of my said marriage until the day of his death, to wit: the 15 day of October A. D. 1846 when my said husband died at New[?] Wetumpka [Wetumpka is in Elmore Co., AL and James was supposed to have died in Coosa Co., AL. Could New Wetumpka have been in Coosa Co., AL and later named Rockford where Martha is known to have lived and mentioned in one application as James' place of death?] in the State of Alabama, and that I have not since remarried; that there was never any legal impediment to said marriage.
      No. 1. That my said husband being duly enlisted, as aforesaid, actually served sixty days with the Army or Navy of the United States in Mexico, or on the coast or frontier thereof, or en route thereto, in the war with that Nation, which service was as follows: as a private in company known as Taledega Rangers at and was honorably discharged at Mobile on the ____ day of __________ A. D. 1846
      No. 2. That my said husband was actually engaged in a skirmish in said war, some time in June 1846 and was brought home on or about the 8th day of Sept. 1846 and died from said wound on 15th Oct. 1846.
      No. 3. That my husband was personally named in a resolution of Congress for a specific service in said war, to wit: In the resolution of the ___________ day of ____________ A. D. _______, and was honorably discharged at __________________ on the __________ day of ______ A. D.
      No. 4. That I am 83 years of age, and that I was born on or about the 28 day of Sept A. D. 1814, at Richmond Co., in the State of Georgia
      No. 5. That I am disabled by reason of Age and the said disability was not incurred while I was in any manner voluntarily engaged in, or aiding or abetting the late rebellion against the authority of the United States.
      No. 6. That I claim pension by reason of the fact that I am dependent in whole or in part for my support upon a Grand Daughter, not legally bound for my support and that such dependence as alleged consists in this, to wit: _________________________________
      That I have ______ heretofore made application for pension or bounty land, which said claim is No. ______
      That I am a pensioner of the United States as ________________ under certificate No. ______, at the rate of _____ dollars per month.
      That in support and proof of my right to pension I tender herewith, under the regulations prescribed by the Secretary of the Interion, the following evidence: _____________ and the affidavits of _____________
      That since the death of my said husband I have resided at the following places, to wit: in Coosa County Alabama and Harris County Georgia and in Columbus Georgia That I am not [smeared ink]ing under any political disabilities imposed by the 14th amendment to the Constitution of the United States.
      And I hereby appoint, with full power of substitution and revocation, H. J. Hayden & Co. War Claims Attorneys, of Washington, D. C. my true and lawful attorneys, to prosecute my claim.
      My Post-office address is Columbus Ga /s/_C.[?]_J._Thornton___________/s/_Martha_B_Culpepper /s/_S_E_Lawthon[?]_Notary_Public STATE OF Georgia, County of Muscogee, ss:
      Before me, Jno C Cook, a clerk of a court of record, on this 24 day of August, A. D. 1897 personally appeared Martha B Culpepper known to me as a person described in, and who executed and signed the foregoing declaration for pension, as widow of James J. Culpepper and whom I certify to be a credible person and of good report for truth and veracity in the community in which she lives, who, being by me first duly sworn, deposes and says that she has read (if claimant cannot read, read to her and so state in acknowledgement) the foregoing declaration and knows the contents thereof, and that all the facts therein stated are true. ________________________________/s/_Jno_C_Cook_Clk _______________________________________S_C_M_C_[?]
      The following is from pp. 806-808 of Vol. 18 of The Encyclopedia Americana International Edition published by Grolier, Inc. of Danbury, CT: MEXICAN WAR. The annexation of Texas in 1845 laid the foundation for the war with Mexico. Although Texas had been for many years practically free, and had been recognized by the United States, Britain, France and other countries, Mexico refused to acknowledge its independence. When the United States proposed to admit Texas into the Union, Mexico gave warning that the annexation would be equivalent to a declaration of war. On March 6, 1845, Mexico protested, and soon afterward withdrew her minister and severed diplomatic relations. Her acts, however, scarcely justified her threats, as at that time at least little or no preparation was made for war. It has, therefore, been claimed that had the American government used a conciliatory policy peace might have been preserved and friendly relations reestablished. At the moment, however, the Mexican people and authorities were in a rather belligerent attitude, due in part to pride and in part to an expectation that the United States would soon be involved in a war with Britain over the Oregon boundary, in which case Mexico would have a powerful ally to aid her. Did President James Polk at this point seek to strengthen this hope in the minds of the Mexicans, intending at the proper moment to make a compromise and peace with Britain, as was done, and thus leave Mexico at the mercy of the United States? Perhaps history can never answer the question, but events at least seemed to march in harmony with the thought, For Mexico soon found itself in the dilemma that it must either sell California to the United States, receiving in return a goodly sum of money to appease its pride, or engage in a war to sustain its honor and territorial integrity. Mexico bravely, but perhaps not wisely, chose the latter alternative, not fully realizing the inequality of the contestants, nor the depth of the humiliation to which it would be subjected. Doubtless President Polk preferred to acquire California without war, but its acquisition was to be the principal measure of his administration. Hence if war was the only means to secure it, war it must be--at least enough to get possession of the desired territory. Causes of the War. The immediate occasion of the war was the dispute in regard to the western boundary of Texas. Proclaiming its independence in 1836, Texas asserted that its western boundary was the Rio Grande to its source thence due north to 42° north latitude. The following year the United States recognized its independence and, in December 1845, by a joint resolution admitted it into the Union as a state, providing that boundary disputes were to be settled by the United States. President Polk accepted the boundary claimed by Texas, and on Jan. 16, 1846, ordered Gen. Zachary Taylor to march to the eastern bank of the Rio Grande as the western boundary of the United States. Mexico insisted that the Nueces River--100 miles (160 km) east--was the true western boundary of Texas and therefore that General Taylor was now on Mexican soil. On April 25, 1846, the first blood was shed in a conflict between a band of Mexican troops that had crossed to the eastern side of the Rio Grande and a company of American soldiers. The news of this action was immediately communicated by General Taylor to President Polk, who sent his now noted message to Congress, asserting the war was begun by the act of Mexico on U. S. soil. Congress finally accepted, after a stormy debate in the Senate, the president's statement, and war was recognized as existing. Other causes were also at work and help to make a decision in regard to the justness of the war still more difficult. Mexico for many years had been in a chronic state of revolution. The natural result followed. American citizens in Mexico sustained property losses and doubtless were frequently unjustly arrested and even imprisoned. Claims arising from these causes had been in part settled under a convention of 1840 but many of them were still pending. Some were just; more, either unjust or extravagant in amount. President Polk united these unsettled claims with the boundary question and demanded that Mexico receive an envoy extraordinary with power to settle both--on its face an eminently fair proposition. On the other hand, Mexico professed to be ready to receive an ambassador to settle the boundary dispute but declined to receive John Slidell as U. S. minister when he was commissioned to settle all disputes, insisting that the two questions were distinct in kind and origin and should not be united. President Polk in his message asserted that this action of Mexico was in violation of its promise to receive a minister and hence justified his administration in its measures and forced him to take possession of the disputed territory. The need for more slave territory was perhaps another factor in causing the war. At least many from the South took an aggressive position on all questions in dispute between the two countries and thus made a peaceable settlement more difficult. Both the economic and the political reasons for more territory began to be felt by 1846--the one to have new soil over which to spread the land-exhausting system of slavery; and the other to have new territory out of which to carve new slave states so that the equilibrium between slave and free states might be maintained. Some other forces tending to arouse the war and aggressive spirit may be noted. The cry of "manifest destiny" played a part. Many, especially in the West, felt that the Pacific Ocean was the natural western boundary of the United States. They also demanded the "Golden Gate" that commerce might be opened up with the Orient. The two great parties--the Whigs and the Democrats-- divided sharply on the question. The war, in fact, became almost a party, instead of a national, issue. The Democrats, as a rule, supported the administration and its claim that the war was just. The Whigs, on the contrary, asserted that it was a most unholy and unrighteous war, and characterized it as "Polk's war." Abraham Lincoln, entering Congress in 1847, became a severe critic of the policy pursued, while Thomas Corwin of Ohio went so far as to use this language: "If I were a Mexican I would tell you, 'Have you not room in your own country to bury your dead men? If you come into mine we will greet you with bloody hands, and welcome you to hospitable graves.'" President Polk summarized his reasons for recommending that Congress recognize war as existing as follows: "The grievous wrongs perpetrated by Mexico upon our citizens throughout a long period of years remain unredressed; and solemn treaties ... have been disregarded.... Our commerce with Mexico has been almost annihilated." He then added: "As war exists, and ... exists by the act of Mexico herself we are called upon, by every consideration of duty and patriotism, to vindicate, with decision the honor, the rights, and the interests of our country." The Campaigns. The war with Mexico was accepted as a fact by Congress on May 13, 1846. There were four principal fields of action in its prosecution, (1) Along the Rio Grande, under the command of Gen. Zachary Taylor; (2) in California, where Capt. John Charles Fremont and Commodore Robert Field Stockton were in command, (3) in New Mexico, with Col. Stephen Watts Kearny leading the U. S. forces; and (4) from Veracruz to Mexico City, under the command of Gen. Winfield Scott, the commander in chief of the U. S. armies. Everywhere success attended the arms of the United States. It was one of the few wars in history in which no defeat was sustained by one party and no victory won by the other. General Taylor defeated the Mexican troops at Palo Alto on May 8, 1846, and at Resaca de la Palma the following day, and captured Matamoros on the 18th. He remained near that city for some weeks to recruit his army and prepare to advance into the interior. On September 24 he entered Monterrey, after a siege of four days and a gallant resistance by the Mexicans. Taylor's most famous victory, however, was won on Feb. 22-23, 1847, at Buena Vista. General Scott gave orders, which fell into the hands of Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, the Mexican general, for General Taylor to send some nine regiments to aid Scott in his proposed attack on Veracruz. Santa Anna immediately marched his whole command against Taylor expecting to crush him in this weakened condition. It was 20,000 men against about 5,000. But the skill of Taylor, the persistence of his army, and the organization and equipment of the U. S. troops won a great victory. Taylor became the hero of the hour, and Buena Vista made him an irresistible presidential candidate.... Fremont's course in California has been a subject of keen controversy. As leader of an exploring expedition he was already in northern California, and early in 1846 was recalled to the Sacramento Valley. California was the goal of the political policy of Polk's administration. The means to secure its acquisition were uncertain. It might be gained by war or by filling the territory with settlers from the United States, who in the course of time might bring it into the Union as Texas had already been annexed. Or it might be effected by securing the goodwill of the native Californians who were unhappy under Mexican rule. The latter policy seems to have been the one adopted by the administration. The U. S. consul at Monterey, Calif., Thomas Oliver Larkin, was developing this policy with a good prospect of success, it is claimed, when Fremont appeared on the scene. He seems to have developed a fourth policy--namely, the establishment of an independent government under the control of settlers from the United States in the Sacramento Valley. This movement resulted in the so-called Bear Flag Republic and in virtual civil war between the native Californians and the newer settlers. At this moment the Mexican War began, and the Bear Flag was replaced by the Stars and Stripes. It has been claimed by some California historians that Fremont's course, had not the Mexican War come at the moment it did, might have lost California to the United States. The native Californians, alienated as they were by his course, might have put themselves under a British protectorate in revenge for the treatment accorded them. Be that as it may, by the end of 1846 all California was conquered and held by U. S. troops and Fremont was regarded as the hero who had won the "Golden Gate" by his energy and decision. Santa Fe was captured by Colonel Kearny on Aug. 18, 1846, and New Mexico was secured with almost no loss of life. By the end of the year, therefore, all the territory that the administration desired was in the possession of its armies, but Mexico was still unconquered. Scott had been chafing in Washington during the summer and fall of 1846 while Taylor was winning his brilliant victories. He asked to go to the front to assume chief command, but the administration retained him at the capital under the plea of needing his advice. As it happened this Democratic war was officered by Whig generals. Scott had already been a candidate for the Whig nomination for the presidency. The charge was now made that Scott was kept from command for fear that success might make him a more formidable candidate in 1848. Finally, when he was sent to the front in January 1847, the cry was raised that the purpose was to dim the luster of Taylor's victories, or at least to divide the popular support between the two generals in such a way as to destroy the political prospects of both. General Scott besieged Veracruz in March 1847, and by the 27th had captured the fortress of San Juan de Ulua, which had been thought almost impregnable, and was ready to enter the city. On April 8 he started into the interior, and on the 18th captured Cerro Gordo, the 19th, Jalapa, and the 22d, Perote. On May 15 he entered the important city of Puebla. Remaining here for some weeks he again advanced, in August, toward the capital, and on the 10th came in sight of the city. Two important victories were won August 20--at Contreras and at Churubusco. He captured Molino del Rey on September 8, and the victory of Chapultepec on September 12-13 gave him Mexico City itself, which he entered on September 14 with an army of only 6,000 men. General Santa Anna escaped from the city and attempted, unsuccessfully, to organize further military resistance. The war was practically over, but the victory was so complete that it began to be a question whether there was any government left with sufficient power to negotiate a treaty of peace. An agitation began with friends both in and out of Congress, as well as in the cabinet, looking to the annexation of the whole of Mexico. John C. Calhoun, on the one hand, and Daniel Webster and a majority of the Whigs, on the other, joined hands to defeat this plan. President Polk was finally forced to make the ultimate decision. Nicholas Trist was sent in March 1847 to Mexico to make a treaty of peace. Failing, he was ordered in the fall to return to Washington, but disobeying instructions, he remained in Mexico. On Feb. 2, 1848, he concluded a treaty of peace in harmony with his original instructions. The administration was in a quandary. To ratify meant to condone the disobedience of Trist. To reject meant a prolongation of the war, and time to perfect the intrigue for the annexation of "All Mexico." President Polk, after some hesitation, decided to send the treaty to the Senate for its consideration. Received February 23, it was ratified, after some amendments, on March 10, by a vote of 38 to 14. On May 30, treaty ratifications were exchanged and the war ended. The Mexicans had fought bravely, even stubbornly and at times skillfully, yet in every contest, even when the odds were greatly in their favor, without a single victory. In part superior leadership and training won for the soldiers of the northern republic, and in part their cooler and more persistent character. But in the main it was not bravery, nor generalship, nor even character that won. It was science and education applied in the equipment of the armies, the guns of the soldiers, the cannon, and the powder in the arsenals that made the one so much more effective than the other that the most daring bravery was no counterpoise. The Treaty of Peace. The treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo gave to the administration of President Polk the territory that according to his diary he intended to acquire--California and New Mexico. Mexico in return for the loss of its fairest northern provinces was paid $15 million and was released from all claims of all kinds held by citizens of the United States against it, estimated at $3,250,000, which the United States assumed. Boundary lines were drawn, and provision made in regard to other questions at issue between the two countries. Results. Usually successfully waged wars redound to the credit of the party in power. In this case, however, the Democratic party, the author and supporter of the war, was defeated by the Whig party, the party of opposition and criticism, in the presidential election of 1848. The Whigs made use of the popularity of a successful general (Taylor) to defeat the party that had made his glory possible. Evidently the people were ready to accept the fruits of the war, but also were ready to punish the party they believed had acted wrongly. A large number of young officers, destined for renown in later years, proved their worth in this war. Ulysses S. Grant and William T. Sherman, Robert E Lee, "Stonewall" Jackson, and Jefferson Davis, foreshadowed, in this Mexican struggle, the greatness that was to be theirs in the Civil War from 1861 to 1865. The acquisition of some 522,568 square miles (1,353,450 sq km) of territory--about one sixth of the modern continental United States--was the most important immediate as well as remote result. It was important in the issues that its acquisition precipitated. Should it be slave or free territory? Who should determine its institutions? Out of this question grew the larger one who had the right to control the institutions of the territories in general? To settle the first question David Wilmot, a Democrat of Pennsylvania, proposed the celebrated Wilmot Proviso, which would exclude slavery forever from all territory acquired from Mexico. Four long years of intense and bitter debate followed. This question and a series of others were settled temporarily in the Compromise of 1850. The second question was answered by the term "nonintervention," which meant, or soon came to mean, one thing to Douglas and the Northern Democrats and another to Davis and the South. Three main theories were evolved or defended in answer to the third query: (1) the view that Congress had the right to control the institutions of the territories and could make them slave or free at its will, (2) the Dickinson-Cass-Douglas doctrine of popular or "squatter sovereignty--the doctrine that the people of a territory themselves, while yet in a territorial status, determined their own institutions, (3) the radical Southern view that slaves were property, and, as property, might be taken into any territory-- the common public domain of the states--with no constitutional power anywhere to hinder or prevent. The new territory was important secondly in its industrial and political effect on the nation. The United States now had an outlook on the Pacific Ocean comparable to that on the Atlantic. China, Japan, and the rest of the Orient were brought within the circle of its influence. Conditions favorable to further expansion were prepared. In addition to the great effect on commerce thus prefigured, that on wealth and industry was not less. The gold, silver, copper, and other mineral wealth of the Rocky Mountain region would flow into the pockets of the people of the United States. This vast addition of territory and wealth tended also to emphasize national pride and ambition, to arouse a still more intense belief in "manifest destiny," to develop a more optimistic tone, and perhaps also to produce a more materialistic spirit. HOWARD W. CALDWELL University of Nebraska. 
Research note2012 He is referenced in a research note for John F. Culpepper of Muscogee Co., GA.9 

Family

Martha Byne Blackstone (28 Sep 1814 - 23 Dec 1899)
Marriage License20 Dec 1828 James applied for a marriage license to wed Martha Byne Blackstone at Crawford Co., Georgia, on 20 Dec 1828. 
Marriage*21 Dec 1828 He married Martha Byne Blackstone at Crawford Co., Georgia, on 21 Dec 1828 at age 22.3 
Children
ChartsHenry Culpeper of Lower Norfolk: DNA Status Chart (Male only, 8 generations)
John Culpepper of Randolph Co, AL: Descendant Chart
Last Edited1 Mar 2013

Citations

  1. P 173 (John 1m 26-45 w/5m 0-10, 2m 10-16, 1f 0-10, 1f 16-26, 2f 26-45)
    p 173 Nancy (1 of 2 females 26-45 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Joel (1 of 2 males age 10-16 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 John J. (1 of 2 males age 10-16 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Daniel P. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Sarah O. (1 female 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Francis G. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 James I. J. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 George W. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper).
  2. 1810 Federal Census, United States.
    Columbia, Richland District, SC
    John Culpepper, page 173, 5 M0-10, 2 M10-16, 1 M26-45, 1 F0-10, 1 F16-26, 2 F26-45, 16 slaves.
  3. Ancestry.com, compiler, Georgia Marriages to 1850, Online database at Ancestry.com, 1997.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/inddbs/2085a.htm
    James L. Culpepper and Martha B. Blackstone on 21 Dec 1828 in Crawford Co., GA.
  4. 1830 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 399, Crawford Co., GA
    James J. Culpepper, 1 M0-5, 1 M20-30, 1 F15-20.
  5. Rev. S. Emmett Lucas Jr., The 1832 Gold Lottery of Georgia, Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1988, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. 975.8 R2lb.
    James J. Culpepper, Morris District, Crawford Co., GA, drew lot 1133/20/3 in what became Paulding Co., GA, 1832.
  6. Indian War Pension Application dated 1892, Georgia. Indigent Widow’s Application #2073, no certificate. Remarks: Old Wars Widow Pending, Mexican Widow Rejected #455.
  7. DOB based on 1950 census, POB based on pension application.
  8. See his biography.
  9. Warren L. Culpepper (#1942), Former publisher of Culpepper Connections, e-mail address.

Martha Byne Blackstone

Female, #32066, (28 Sep 1814 - 23 Dec 1899)
Father*John M. Blackstone (6 Jan 1781 - 28 Jun 1859)
Mother*Catherine Harvey (7 Mar 1782 - Jul 1878)
Birth*28 Sep 1814 Martha was born at Richmond Co., Georgia, on 28 Sep 1814. 
Marriage License20 Dec 1828 Martha applied for a marriage license to wed James I. J. Culpepper at Crawford Co., Georgia, on 20 Dec 1828. 
Marriage*21 Dec 1828 She married James I. J. Culpepper at Crawford Co., Georgia, on 21 Dec 1828 at age 14.1 
Married Name21 Dec 1828  As of 21 Dec 1828, her married name was Culpepper. 
1830 Census1 Jun 1830 Martha was probably a free white female, age 15 and under 20, in James I. J. Culpepper's household, on the 1830 Census at Crawford Co., Georgia. Unaccounted for is 1 M0-5.2 
Birth of Soncirca 1834 Her son John G. Culpepper was born circa 1834 at Crawford Co., Georgia
Birth of Sonbetween 1830 and 1840 Her son William Culpepper was born between 1830 and 1840. 
Birth of Soncirca 1836 Her son George Washington Culpepper was born circa 1836 at Chambers Co., Alabama.3 
Birth of Soncirca 1839 Her son Nathan F. Culpepper was born circa 1839 at Chambers Co., Alabama
Death of Spouse15 Oct 1846 Her husband James I. J. Culpepper died on 15 Oct 1846 at Coosa Co., Alabama
1850 Census*23 Oct 1850 Martha was listed as the head of a family on the 1850 Census on 23 Oct 1850 at Coosa District, Coosa Co., Alabama.4 
Death of Father28 Jun 1859 Her father John M. Blackstone died on 28 Jun 1859 at Crawford Co., Georgia
1860 Census25 Jul 1860 Virginia, Martha and Martha listed as a household member living with John G. Culpepper in the 1860 Census at Mountain Hill, Harris Co., Georgia.5 
Death of Son19 Sep 1863 Her son George Washington Culpepper died on 19 Sep 1863 at Chickamauga, Walker Co., Georgia.6 
Death of Son7 Dec 1864 Her son Nathan F. Culpepper died on 7 Dec 1864 at Franklin, Williamson Co., Tennessee
Death of Soncirca 1867 Her son John G. Culpepper died circa 1867 at Randolph Co., Alabama
1870 Census*1 Jun 1870 Martha was listed as the head of a family on the 1870 Census at Harris Co., Georgia.7 
Death of MotherJul 1878 Her mother Catherine Harvey died in Jul 1878 at Crawford Co., Georgia
1880 Census*1 Jun 1880 Martha was listed as the head of a family on the 1880 Census at Harris Co., Georgia.8 
City Directory*'1898-99' She was listed in the '1898-99' city directory for Columbus, Muscogee Co., Georgia. From this listing and the 75+ year age differential known to exist between Martha and the three younger people in the household (James, William, and Josephine), it seems likely that Martha was their great-grandmother.9 
Death*23 Dec 1899 She died at Columbus, Muscogee Co., Georgia, on 23 Dec 1899 at age 85.10 
Burial*24 Dec 1899 Her body was interred on 24 Dec 1899 at Pine Grove Church Cemetery, Harris Co., Georgia.10,11 
Research note2012 She is referenced in a research note for John F. Culpepper of Muscogee Co., GA.12 

Family

James I. J. Culpepper (3 Jun 1806 - 15 Oct 1846)
Marriage License20 Dec 1828 Martha applied for a marriage license to wed James I. J. Culpepper at Crawford Co., Georgia, on 20 Dec 1828. 
Marriage*21 Dec 1828 She married James I. J. Culpepper at Crawford Co., Georgia, on 21 Dec 1828 at age 14.1 
Children
Last Edited12 Mar 2012

Citations

  1. Ancestry.com, compiler, Georgia Marriages to 1850, Online database at Ancestry.com, 1997.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/inddbs/2085a.htm
    James L. Culpepper and Martha B. Blackstone on 21 Dec 1828 in Crawford Co., GA.
  2. 1830 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 399, Crawford Co., GA
    James J. Culpepper, 1 M0-5, 1 M20-30, 1 F15-20.
  3. DOB based on 1950 census, POB based on pension application.
  4. 1850 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 63, Lines 1-6, Coosa District, Coosa Co., AL
    Martha Culpepper, 35, F, GA
    John Culpepper, 16, M, Farmer, GA
    George W. Culpepper, 14, M, AL
    Nathan Culpepper, 11, M, AL
    Martha Culpepper, 8, F AL
    Vianna Culpepper, 2, F, AL.
  5. 1860 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 594, Family 626, Mountain Hill PO, Harris Co., GA
    John Culpepper, 28, M, Operator in Factory, $-/$50, GA
    Martha Culpepper, 40, F, GA
    Virginia Culpepper, 12, F, GA
    Martha Culpepper, 3, F, GA.
  6. Lillian Henderson (transcription by Fred Gleaton), compiler, Roster of Confederate Soldiers of Georgia, 1861-1865, Americus, GA: Lake Blackshear Regional Libray, 1964.
  7. 1870 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 127B, Family 176, Hamilton PO, Harris Co., GA
    Martha Culpepper, 56, F, Keeping House, GA
    Viana Culpepper, 21, F, Farm Laborer, GA.
  8. 1880 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 553C, Family 156, ED 61, Lower 19th, Harris Co., GA
    Martha (Blackstone) Culpepper, Self, F, Md, 65, GA/VA/SC
    Vianna L. Culpepper, Dau, F, S, 30, --- , AL/SC/GA
    Lucy E. Culpepper, GDau, F, S, Mulatto, 9, GA/GA/AL
    G. Catharine Culpepper, GDau, F, S, Mulatto, 2M, GA/GA/AL.
  9. 1898-99 R. L. Polk's city directory for Columbus, Ga., p. 172
    Residing at 1829 Third Avenue (reverse index, p. 112, shows Mrs. Martha B. Culpepper as head of this household):
    Culpepper, James D., operative for Eagle & Phenix Mills,
    Culpepper, Josephine, Miss, operative for Eagle & Phenix Mills
    Culpepper, Martha B. (widow of J. J.)
    Culpepper, William C., operative for Eagle & Phenix Mills.
  10. Ledger-Enquirer, Columbus (Muscogee Co.), GA.
    http://www.ledger-enquirer.com/
    Obituary of Martha Byne Blackstone Culpepper (#32066), published 24 Dec 1899.
  11. Find a Grave (online database)
    http://www.findagrave.com
    Memorial #86019242.
  12. Warren L. Culpepper (#1942), Former publisher of Culpepper Connections, e-mail address.

John M. Blackstone

Male, #32067, (6 Jan 1781 - 28 Jun 1859)
Birth*6 Jan 1781 John was born at Natural Bridge, Rockbridge Co., Virginia, on 6 Jan 1781. 
Employment* John's occupation: State Senator. 
Marriage*11 Apr 1799 He married Catherine Harvey at Richmond Co., Georgia, on 11 Apr 1799 at age 18. 
Birth of Son19 Oct 1805 His son James Harvey Blackstone was born on 19 Oct 1805. 
Birth of Son5 Jan 1808 His son Thomas Walker Blackstone was born on 5 Jan 1808. 
Death of Son5 Apr 1808 His son James Harvey Blackstone died on 5 Apr 1808. 
Death of Son19 Apr 1808 His son Thomas Walker Blackstone died on 19 Apr 1808. 
Birth of Son14 Sep 1809 His son Gasaway Davis Blackstone was born on 14 Sep 1809. 
Death of Son12 Oct 1812 His son Gasaway Davis Blackstone died on 12 Oct 1812. 
Birth of Son10 May 1817 His son Commodore Anson Blackstone was born on 10 May 1817 at Georgia
Census*1830 He was in the in 1830 census at Crawford Co., Georgia
Census1840 He was listed as a resident in the census report at Chambers Co., Alabama, in 1840. 
Census23 Oct 1850 He was listed as a resident in the census report at Coosa District, Coosa Co., Alabama, on 23 Oct 1850. 
Death*28 Jun 1859 He died at Crawford Co., Georgia, on 28 Jun 1859 at age 78. 
Burial* His body was interred at Knoxville, Crawford Co., Georgia
Biography* According to Paula Millhollon in a 12 Feb 1991 letter, John M. Blackstone's father died before he was born. "His mother was Winfield Zachary Blackstone: she married Jonathan Paine in 1795." The following inscription is from his tombstone in the cemetery of Salem Primitive Baptist Church, three miles northeast of Knoxville, Crawford Co., GA: "Crawford Co. first Senator & held the honor nine successiveterms. Helped to organize Crawford Co. & locate the county site and named it Knoxville. Helped to organize the first Inferior Court ever held in the county. Salem's first pastor, helped to organize Mt Paron 1824, Mt Carmel 1826, Salem, Providence, Union & Mt Calvery. Acted as first moderatorof Echeconnee Association at Mt Carmel 1829."
The family Bible of a son, Commodore Anson Blackstone, gives John M. Blackstone's date of birth as 6 Jan 1781. Since John M. Blackstone listed himself as 69 years of age in the 1850 census, this would tend to support the 1781 date. Mrs. Paula Millhollon wrote that in 1815/16, John M. Blackstone was pastor of a church in Burke Co., GA. She believes that he was in Warren Co., GA in 1820. Mrs. Paula Millhollon also said that there is a card in the Atlanta Archives that states that John M. Blackstone's "father killed in the Revolution." 

Family

Catherine Harvey (7 Mar 1782 - Jul 1878)
Marriage*11 Apr 1799 He married Catherine Harvey at Richmond Co., Georgia, on 11 Apr 1799 at age 18. 
Children
Last Edited5 Jul 2004

Catherine Harvey

Female, #32068, (7 Mar 1782 - Jul 1878)
Birth*7 Mar 1782 Catherine was born at South Carolina on 7 Mar 1782. 
Marriage*11 Apr 1799 She married John M. Blackstone at Richmond Co., Georgia, on 11 Apr 1799 at age 17. 
Married Name11 Apr 1799  As of 11 Apr 1799, her married name was Blackstone. 
Birth of Son19 Oct 1805 Her son James Harvey Blackstone was born on 19 Oct 1805. 
Birth of Son5 Jan 1808 Her son Thomas Walker Blackstone was born on 5 Jan 1808. 
Death of Son5 Apr 1808 Her son James Harvey Blackstone died on 5 Apr 1808. 
Death of Son19 Apr 1808 Her son Thomas Walker Blackstone died on 19 Apr 1808. 
Birth of Son14 Sep 1809 Her son Gasaway Davis Blackstone was born on 14 Sep 1809. 
Death of Son12 Oct 1812 Her son Gasaway Davis Blackstone died on 12 Oct 1812. 
Birth of Son10 May 1817 Her son Commodore Anson Blackstone was born on 10 May 1817 at Georgia
Census*1830 She was in the in 1830 census at Crawford Co., Georgia
Census23 Oct 1850 She was listed as a resident in the census report at Coosa District, Coosa Co., Alabama, on 23 Oct 1850. 
Death of Spouse28 Jun 1859 Her husband John M. Blackstone died on 28 Jun 1859 at Crawford Co., Georgia
Census1860 She was listed as a resident in the census report at Crawford Co., Georgia, in 1860. 
Death*Jul 1878 She died at Crawford Co., Georgia, in Jul 1878 at age 96. 
Biography* Catherine's tombstone apparently reads "8 May 1782 -- Jul 1878." 
Research note*7 Dec 2004 From Tina Keene Peddie:
     "I believe my APSELIA who mar. BENJAMIN MORRIS (SC), may be a sister to this CATHERINE 'HARVEY' who mar. JOHN M. BLACKSTONE. These families are very close, and some say APSELIA was a HARVEY. They are closely related to families also of HATCHER, HANCOCK & STEMBRIDGE, that went to Hancock & Crawford Co.GA. If anyone has any info on my APSELIA (Harvey or Blackstone?), who mar. my BENJ. MORRIS, I'd sure appreciate hearing from you! Thanks! Cuz'n Tina/CA."1 

Family

John M. Blackstone (6 Jan 1781 - 28 Jun 1859)
Marriage*11 Apr 1799 She married John M. Blackstone at Richmond Co., Georgia, on 11 Apr 1799 at age 17. 
Children
Last Edited24 Jan 2005

Citations

  1. E-mail written 4 Dec 2004 to Lew Griffin from Tina Keene Peddie, e-mail address.

George Washington Culpepper of Meriwether Co., GA

Male, #32069, (6 Dec 1808 - 20 Dec 1901)
Father*John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL (1 Oct 1772 - 13 May 1855)
Mother*Nancy Gillespie (c 1778 - 25 Jul 1848)
DNA* George has been proven by DNA and genealogical research to be a descendant of Joseph Culpepper of Edgecombe Co., NC, who is a son of Robert Culpepper of Lower Norfolk, the son of Henry Culpepper of Lower Norfolk, VA. 
Birth*6 Dec 1808 George was born at South Carolina on 6 Dec 1808.1 
1810 Census6 Aug 1810 Daniel, Francis, James and George was probably a free white male, age under 10, in John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL's household on the 1810 Census at Richland District, South Carolina. Unaccounted for are 1 male 0-10 and 1 female 16-26..2,3 
1830 Census1 Jun 1830 William and George was probably a free white male, age 15 and under 20, in John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL's household, on the 1830 Census at Monroe Co., Georgia.4 
Marriage*17 Feb 1831 He married Perlina Perdue at Forsyth, Monroe Co., Georgia, on 17 Feb 1831 at age 22. 
Land Lottery*1832 He had a fortunate draw in the land lottery in 1832 at Meriwether Co., Georgia,
lot 204/5/3 in what became Cass (later Bartow) Co., GA.5 
Birth of Son26 Mar 1834 His son James Daniel Culpepper was born on 26 Mar 1834 at Meriwether Co., Georgia.6 
Birth of Son8 Jul 1835 His son John Wesley Culpepper was born on 8 Jul 1835 at Meriwether Co., Georgia.7 
Birth of Son23 Oct 1837 His son William Jefferson Culpepper was born on 23 Oct 1837 at Meriwether Co., Georgia
Birth of Son17 May 1839 His son Noah Smith Culpepper was born on 17 May 1839 at Meriwether Co., Georgia
1840 Census*1 Jun 1840 George was listed as the head of a family on the 1840 Census on 1 Jun 1840 at Meriwether Co., Georgia.8 
Birth of Son11 Oct 1842 His son Simeon Fletcher Culpepper was born on 11 Oct 1842 at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia
Birth of Son5 Jun 1847 His son Thomas Joel Culpepper was born on 5 Jun 1847 at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia
Death of Mother25 Jul 1848 His mother Nancy Gillespie died on 25 Jul 1848 at Meriwether Co., Georgia
1850 Census*1 Jun 1850 George was listed as the head of a family on the 1850 Census on 1 Jun 1850 at Meriwether Co., Georgia.9 
Birth of Son1 Jul 1852 His son George Green Culpepper was born on 1 Jul 1852 at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia.10 
Death of Father13 May 1855 His father John Culpepper of Randolph Co., AL died on 13 May 1855 at Randolph Co., Alabama
1860 Slave Census*1 Jun 1860 George was listed as a slave owner on the 1860 Census at Meriwether Co., Georgia, and owned 2 slaves.11 
1860 Census*1 Jun 1860 George was listed as the head of a family on the 1860 Census at Meriwether Co., Georgia.12 
ProbateJan 1863 During probate, George Washington Culpepper of Meriwether Co., GA was identified as an heir of James Perdue in Jan 1863 at Monroe Co., Georgia.13 
Death of Son8 Apr 1864 His son William Jefferson Culpepper died on 8 Apr 1864 at Mansfield, De Soto Parish, Louisiana.14 
Death of Son16 Aug 1864 His son John Wesley Culpepper died on 16 Aug 1864 at Fussells Mill, Henrico Co., Virginia.7 
1870 Census*1 Jun 1870 George was listed as the head of a family on the 1870 Census at Meriwether Co., Georgia.15 
Photographed*say 1880 He was photographed say 1880 at Meriwether Co., Georgia.16
George Washington Culpepper
1880 Census*1 Jun 1880 George was listed as the head of a family on the 1880 Census at Meriwether Co., Georgia.17 
Death of Spouse21 Jul 1882 His wife Perlina Perdue died on 21 Jul 1882 at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia.18 
Photographedcirca 1900 He was photographed circa 1900 at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia,
Five generations: George Washington Culpepper,Eunice Catherine (Albright) Speer (standing), Emma Alline (Culpepper) Albright holding Dorothy Charles Speer, and James Daniel Culpepper on the right.19,20
Five Generations
1900 Census1 Jun 1900 George was listed as a father in James Daniel Culpepper's household on the 1900 Census at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia.21 
Photographed22 Nov 1900 He appeared as the father in a family photograph on 22 Nov 1900 at age 66
Assumed to be Thanksgiving Day 1900:

1st row: George W. Culpepper, Mary Elizabeth Culpepper, Warren Culpepper.

2nd row: James Daniel Culpepper, Fereba, Mattie Nall, Cattie Nall, Zora Culpepper, Emma Culpepper Allbright holding her granddaughter Dorothy Speer, Doc Allbright husband of Emma (behind Emma).

Back row: Marvin & Charles Culpepper, Lucy (wife of Marvin), Cora (wife of Warren), Wilbur Culpepper, Susie (wife of Jim, who is back of her with hat), John (next to Jim), son Emmett is not in picture.16
James Daniel Culpepper family
Death*20 Dec 1901 He died at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia, on 20 Dec 1901 at age 93.1 
Burial*circa 21 Dec 1901 His body was interred circa 21 Dec 1901 at Allen-Lee Cemetery, Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia.22,1 
Biography* Mrs. D. W. (Ira Gay) Deam of Gay, GA preserved the John Culpepper Bible record of George Washington Culpepper's birth which was copied by Mrs. D. W. (Lavyn Wright) Sisco: _________________________George Washington Culpepper _________________________b. December 6 1808 _________________________On Tuesday at 2 o'clock P.M.
     This is the same date that appears on George Washington Culpepper's tombstone. However, the birth date that was recorded in George W. Culpepper's Bible (published Saratoga Springs by G. M. Davison 1830) was transcribed: "George W. Culpepper was born December 8th, 1808." A perpetual calendar shows that 6 Dec 1808 was a Tuesday which would seem to give more weight to the record in his father's Bible and the date on the tombstone. The George W. Culpepper Bible record of the marriage was transcribed: "George W Culpepper and Perlina Perdue was Married Feb the 17th 1831." Finally, the death record from the same Bible was transcribed: "G. W. Culpepper departed this life quietly and peasfully December 20th 1901 at 2 o'clock in the morning. done [recorded] by his devoted son J. D."
     Although his obituary indicates that G. W. Culpepper was born in Edgefield District, SC, he was probably born in what was then known as Richland District, SC. By 1807, his father, John Culpepper appeared in Richland District, SC estate records as an administrator of the estate of Daniel Peek, Nancy (Gillespie) Culpepper's presumed grandfather. And in the 1810 census of Richland District, SC, John Culpepper was listed with his wife and six sons (including G. W. Culpepper) and one daughter. It is possible that the John Culpepper family had moved on to Edgefield District, SC by 1813 since William Henry Culpepper reported on his Civil War record that he was born there in 1813. George's father, John Culpepper, received a state grant of 138 acres on Cuffeetown Creek in Edgefield District, SC in 1814 and this is where George's youngest brother, Lewis Peek Culpepper was born. George Washington's father, John Culpepper, has not been found in the 1820 census records of South Carolina or Georgia. The family is presumed to have been living in Edgefield District, SC since in 1823, John Culpepper sold 144 acres on Cuffetown Creek "where I now live" for $800. The family tradition is that John Culpepper moved his family, including George Washington Culpepper, to Georgia when the youngest son, Lewis Peek Culpepper, was seven years old, this would have been 1823/1824. However the earliest record that has been found is an 1827 deed showing that John Culpepper purchased land in the Twelfth District of Monroe Co., GA for $800 from Warren T. Castelberry. John Culpepper was in the 1830 census of Monroe, Co., GA with his wife and 1 10-15 year old male, presumably his youngest son, Lewis Peek Culpepper. Although not yet married, George Washington Culpepper and William Henry Culpepper had apparently already moved out but neither has been found as a head of household in the 1830 census. George Washington Culpepper was apparently still in Monroe County, GA since that is where he married Perlina Perdue. However they must have moved to Meriwether Co., GA shortly thereafter since "George W. Culpepper, Arrington's, Merriwether" was recorded drawing lot 204 in the 5th district of the section 3 in the 1832 Cherokee Land Lottery. As a married man who was a U. S. citizen and who had resided in Georgia for three years, he was elibible for two draws in the lottery. He had claimed his land before Jan 1838 when James F. Smith published a numerical list of the "fortunate drawers" from that lottery. The land was a 160 acre lot near Petits Creek and the Tennessee Road in what was Cass Co., GA and is now Bartow Co., GA. No record has been found of George Washington Culpepper selling this land but he apparently did since he remained in Meriwether Co., GA for the remainder of his life.
     The Culpepper's were listed in the 21 Apr 1905 Greenville, Meriwether Co., GA Vindicator as pioneers of the Greenville, Meriwether County area: Nearly eighty years ago a group of hardy yeomanry settled on adjacent farms a few miles northwest of Greenville near the old Ector mill (now Maffett's). They were John, George and William Culpepper, Allen, Eli and David Peavy, Freeman Blount, Daniel Keith, Joel Sears, William Sutherland, Robert Kendrick, James Martin and the Carlisles....
     In fact, the "eighty years ago" might be a reference to 1827 when Meriwether County was formed from Troup County, GA but based on land, census and marriage records, John Culpepper was in Monroe Co., GA until at least 1832. George Washington Culpepper appears to have been in Monroe County until at least 1831, although, since he has not been located in the 1830 census, it is possible that he was in Meriwether Co., GA and returned to Monroe to be married. And William Henry Culpepper is not believed to have moved his family to Meriwether Co., GA until after the 1835 birth of his son, John Malcolm Culpepper. As noted above, G. W. Culpepper and Perlina Perdue apparently moved to Meriwether Co, GA before the birth of their first child, Maryann, in 1832, since George Washington Culpepper of "Arrington's, Merriwether" drew a lot in the 1832 Cherokee Land Lottery. According to G. W. Culpepper's obituary in The Meriwether Vindicator Friday, 3 Jan 1902, he and his family were living "at what is known as the Beecham Perdue place in the Third District, where he lived when he first moved to this county [Meriwether]" when Maryann died in 1833. G. W. Culpepper does not appear in the Meriwether Co., GA deed records until 1835 when he shows up as a grantee in the 9th District (D-281). John William Culpepper obtained a copy of a 6 Mar 1838 deed (F-233, 234) in which George W. was recorded with his brother, William Henry Culpepper purchasing lot 256 containing 202 1/2 acres in the 8th District of Meriwether Co., GA from Levi M. Adams. Their father, John Culpepper, was also recorded purchasing 50 acres in the next lot in the 8th District of Meriwether County in 1838 (F-296). In 1839, 1842, 1849, 1852 and 1853 George W. Culpepper obtained five more tracts of land in the 11th District of Meriwether County (F-538, G-452, J-126, K-164, K-167). John William Culpepper obtained a copy of F-538 in which on 18 Apr 1839 for $405, Noah Smith sold G. W. Culpepper "half lot of land No. seventy five. Containing one hundred one and a fourth acres more or less. Situate lying and being in the Eleventh district of originally Troup now Meriwether County, and Known as the North half of said lot of land."
     G. W. Culpepper was noted in 1840 and 1850 census records of Meriwether Co., GA. In the 1860 census George. W. Culpepper was recorded with his wife and younger children in the Lutherville P.O. district of Meriwether Co., GA. He owned $2,000 in real estate and had $2,000 in personal property. In January 1863, G. W. Culpepper was mentioned along with five other children, grandchildren, and sons-in-law in Monroe Co., GA deed records (D-580, D585) as relinquishing all claims to the estate of James Perdue, the father of Perlina Perdue, G. W. Culpepper's wife. In exchange, the group received the deed to the plantation where James Perdue lived which they immediately sold to Edmund Dumas for $3,100.
      George W. Culpepper's sons began appearing in the Meriwether Co., GA deed records after the Civil War. In the 1870 census of Greenville P. O. District, Meriwether Co., GA, George Culpepper was recorded with his wife and two youngest children. His real estate was valued at $700 and his personal property was valued at $500. George Culpepper was noted in the 1880 census of Meriwether Co., GA with his wife, son Joel, and Joel's young family. In the 1900 census, "Geo. W. Culpepper" was noted living with of his son, James D. Culpepper, and James's family in Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA.
     The following article appeared in the Greenville, GA Vindicator on April 21, 1905: George W. Culpepper came from South Carolina to Georgia in early life with his father John Culpepper with whom he resided for awhile near Greenville when he transferred his home to Baldwin county. Abiding there some years he returned to Meriwether locating in the northern part of the county near the Wilkes Gold Mine. That section was then in an embryo state of development and Mr. Culpepper was one of the leading spirits in agriculture, education and religious affairs in his community. He was a valuable citizen and neighbor and an influential factor for good in his home and in a wide circle around him. For sixty years or more he was an active, deeply pious, liberal supporting member of first Smith's Chapel and then Prospect Methodist church which absorbed the old chapel. Indeed this zealous old soldier of the Cross was one of the best known laymen of Methodism in this county and in the Georgia conference. Mr. Culpepper was a democrat and some years before the war, he served the county as tax collector [1849-1850]. He was wedded in early life to a Miss Perdue, a splendid christian helpmate and mother who, after about sixty years of conjugal life, passed away leaving her faithful consort - who a few years later died at the age of ninety two years. From this union grew a large family circle: James Culpepper, a useful man in peace and a gallant soldier in war, whose sad death by accident occurred not a great while since; Capt. John Culpepper who fell bravely in defence of southern rights while leading his company of the famous 8th Ga. Regiment in one of the battles near Richmond, Va., not long before the confederate surrender; Capt. Noah Culpepper, also a valiant confederate officer, and after the war, a well known literary teacher, now and long since a worthy citizen of Atlanta; Simeon F. Culpepper, for many years our most efficient clerk of the Superior court, and during the war a gallant member of the 8th Ga. Regiment who followed the flag of the confederacy from the 1st Manassas to the close of the war; George Culpepper, a successful planter and a clever gentleman of this county, near Lone Oak besides other worthy descendants of George W. Culpepper whose names we do not now recall.
     The following was written by W. T. Revill, Editor and Publisher of The Meriwether Vindicator which was published in Greenville, Meriwether Co., GA and it appeared Friday, 3 Jan 1902: Old Citizen Dead On the night of December 19th, 1901, George W. Culpepper died at the residence of his son, James D. Culpepper, near Lone Oak, Meriwether County, Georgia. He was born in Edgefield [probably Richland based on estate and census records] District, South Carolina, on December 8, 1808, which made him 93 years and 11 days old at the time of his death. His people seem to be blessed, if such it is, with longevity. He had a sister who died last year in Alabama at the age of 99 years. He has a brother in Lavaca County, TX, who was living when last heard from, who is over 97 years old. His youngest brother is still living and is near 80 years old. His father moved to Georgia when George W. was eight or nine [actually 15 or 16] years old and settled in Monroe County. At the age of twenty-five he married Perlina Perdue, near Forsyth, Georgia. She died July 27th, 1882. They raised nine children, seven boys and two girls, having lost their first child, a girl, while living at what is known as the Beecham Perdue place in the Third District, where he lived when he first moved to this county. He moved from there to a place three and a half miles above Greenville, now a part of the W. W. Jarrell or Eli Peavy place, and from there to the place on which he died in Lone Oak District. The last move was made about 1840. He was tax collector of Meriwether County in 1849 and 1850, having been elected by the Democratic party over Daniel Fling, the Whig candidate. He never asked for re-election at the close of the term for which he was elected. His education was limited. He went to school three months all told, taking every other week, or week about, as it is called, with his brother, yet he was an excellent reader, wrote a legible hand, and could make any calculation in the transaction of his ordinary business. He was a devoted Christian, having been thoroughly converted when about 25 years of age at a camp meeting in Monroe County and joining the Methodist Church, to which he was loyal to his death. When the whole county was a circuit for the church, or conference, he was nearly always sent to represent his church at the different quarterly conferences all over the county. His house was always the home of the "circuit riders," as they were formerly called. He was a member of the Bible class in the Sabbath school at Prospect Church as long as he was able to attend services. He was a regular attendant at all the church gatherings of "Old Prospect" until six or eight years ago when he began to get too feeble to attend, and he always spoke of his inability to attend with regret. He was present in this "old church" when Young J. Allen, our noted missionary to China, was converted, and in later years gave him his blessing when he first started from Grantville on his mission. His relatives are numerous and scattered over different sections of our country in South Carolina, Alabama, Texas, and other states. Some of them are noted Methodists. He was an incessant Bible reader, although a laboring man on the farm, he never failed to improve every spare moment in studying same and could quote any verse in the Bible if you would give him a word in it, and would tell you in what book and chapter same could be found. When his memory failed in all else, which it did about five years ago, he still remembered many important passages of scripture and would quote them correctly in conversation with any one. His funeral was preached by the pastor of the Grantville circuit, J. W. England, from 2nd Samuel, 3rd chapter, 38th verse. "And the king said unto his servants, Know ye not that there is a prince and a great man fallen this day in Israel?" After the sermon some of the oldest members of the church spoke of his laboring with them in church work over fifty years ago, and of his being always consistent in practicing what he professed. Some of the younger people spoke of the encouragement they had always received from him in trying to live right. It is gratifying to the community in which he lived a Christian life, to feel that he left a good example and to feel that he is now enjoying the happiness for which he spent a whole life of devotion to secure.
     The following mention of Lone Oak and Prospect Church is from "Lone Oak Notes" written by Mrs. Louise D. Herring circa 1894: Uncle George Culpepper, a veteran of fourscore, occupied his accustomed chair within the altar railing. In his case "the hoary head" is indeed "a crown of glory," and his upturned face, so full of interest as his heart drinks in "the droppings of the sanctuary," is a beautiful lesson to younger disciples.
     In a 16 Aug 1993 letter, John William Culpepper, a great-great-grandson of George Washington Culpepper, wrote that Eleanor (Culpepper) Willingham, Margaret Culpepper, and Nancy (Johnson) Gray took him to visit the remains of "the old homeplace of George and Perlina about two miles east of Lone Oak": It is on a rock road about 1/4 mile off the hard road. We found where the original home was by the foundation-chimney rocks and spring next to where the house stood. The rocks were in a clearing in the woods next to a dirt road leading to fields.... George Washington came to this place with his family in approximately 1840 and remained there until he died in 1901.
     Mrs. A. (Eleanor Culpepper) Willingham and her sister, Margaret Culpepper have been the historians for the George Washington Culpepper family and have collected scrapbooks full of information, copies of which have been made available to other family members. In addition, Mrs. Willingham published the History of Allen-Lee Memorial United Methodist Church (formerly Old Prospect Methodist Church) Lone Oak, Georgia 1844-1985 which contains church membership records, cemetery records and other valuable information about the church and the community. 

Family

Perlina Perdue (27 Jun 1812 - 21 Jul 1882)
Marriage*17 Feb 1831 He married Perlina Perdue at Forsyth, Monroe Co., Georgia, on 17 Feb 1831 at age 22. 
Children
ChartsHenry Culpeper of Lower Norfolk: DNA Status Chart (Male only, 8 generations)
John Culpepper of Randolph Co, AL: Descendant Chart
Last Edited10 Jan 2011

Citations

  1. Priscilla Turner, compiler, Meriwether Co., GA Cemeteries, Spartanburg, SC: , 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Book: 975.8455 V39.
    Allen-Lee Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, near Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    + George W. Culpepper, 6 Dec 1808 – 20 Dec 1901.
  2. P 173 (John 1m 26-45 w/5m 0-10, 2m 10-16, 1f 0-10, 1f 16-26, 2f 26-45)
    p 173 Nancy (1 of 2 females 26-45 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Joel (1 of 2 males age 10-16 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 John J. (1 of 2 males age 10-16 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Daniel P. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Sarah O. (1 female 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 Francis G. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 James I. J. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper)
    p 173 George W. (1 of 5 males 0-10 in hh of John Culpepper).
  3. 1810 Federal Census, United States.
    Columbia, Richland District, SC
    John Culpepper, page 173, 5 M0-10, 2 M10-16, 1 M26-45, 1 F0-10, 1 F16-26, 2 F26-45, 16 slaves.
  4. 1830 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 194, Unk Twp, Monroe Co., GA (ID: 31566)
    John Culpepper, 1 M10-15, 2 M15-20, 1 M50-60, 1 F50-60.
  5. James F. Smith, compiler, Georgia Cherokee Land Lottery, 1832, Online database at Ancestry.com, 2000.
    http://www.ancestry.com/search/db.asp?dbid=4242
    George W. Culpepper, Arringtons District, Meriwether Co., GA, drew lot 204/5/3 in what became Cass (later Bartow) Co., GA, 1832.
  6. Priscilla Turner, compiler, Meriwether Co., GA Cemeteries, Spartanburg, SC: , 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Book: 975.8455 V39.
    Allen-Lee Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, near Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    + James Daniel Culpepper, 26 Mar 1834 – 1 Nov 1903, Pvt., Co. B, 1st GA Cav.
  7. Priscilla Turner, compiler, Meriwether Co., GA Cemeteries, Spartanburg, SC: , 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Book: 975.8455 V39.
    Allen-Lee Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, near Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    + John W. Culpepper, 8 Jul 1835 - 16 Aug 1864, 1 Lt, Co. D, 8th GA Inf
    (Marker, only. Buried at battlefield in VA).
  8. 1840 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 111, Unk Twp, Meriwether Co., GA
    George W. Culpepper, 3 M0-5, 1 M5-10, 1 M20-30, 1 F20-30.
  9. 1850 Federal Census, United States.
    Pages 312B-313A, 59th District, Meriwether Co., GA
    G. W. Culpepper, 41, M, Farmer, $1,175, SC
    Perlina Culpepper, 38, F, GA
    J. D. Culpepper, 16, M, GA
    J. W. Culpepper, 13, M, GA
    W. J. Culpepper, 12, M, GA
    N. S. Culpepper, 10, M, GA
    N. L. Culpepper, 9, F, GA
    S. F. Culpepper, 7, M, GA
    S. E. Culpepper, 4, F, GA
    L. J. Culpepper, 3, M, GA
    P. F. Culpepper, 1, F, GA.
  10. Priscilla Turner, compiler, Meriwether Co., GA Cemeteries, Spartanburg, SC: , 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Book: 975.8455 V39.
    Allen-Lee Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, near Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    + George G. Culpepper, 1 Jul 1852 – 16 Mar 1928.
  11. 1860 Federal Census, United States.
    Slave Schedule, Meriwether Co., GA
    G. W. Culpepper, 2 slaves: 30F, 25M.
  12. Pages 415-416, Lutherville PO, Meriwether Co., GA
    George W. Culpepper, 50, M, Farmer, $2000/$2000, SC
    Paulina Culpepper, 48, F, GA
    James D. Culpepper, 26, M, GA
    Feraba Culpepper, 23, F, GA
    John W. Culpepper, 24, M, GA
    Simeon F. Culpepper, 17, M, GA
    Sallie E. Culpepper, 15, F, GA
    Joel Culpepper, 13, M, GA
    Permelia Culpepper, 11, F, GA
    George Culpepper, 8, M, GA.
  13. Abstracted by Lewis W. Griffin, Monroe Co., GA Deeds, 1822-1868, Books A-P, Salt Lake City, UT: Monroe County Superior Court, Published on Microfilm by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1966, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. Films 164,136 - 164,143.
    Book O, Page 580 and 585.
  14. Priscilla Turner, compiler, Meriwether Co., GA Cemeteries, Spartanburg, SC: , 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Book: 975.8455 V39.
    Allen-Lee Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, near Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    + William Jefferson Culpepper, 25 Oct 1837 - 8 Apr 1864, Co. F, 17th TX Cav.
    (Marker, only. Buried at battlefield in LA).
  15. 1870 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 344B, Family 548, Greenville PO, Meriwether Co., GA
    George W. Culpepper, 62, M, Farmer, $200/$500, GA
    Lena Culpepper, 58, F, GA
    Florence Culpepper, 21, F, GA
    George Culpepper, 18, M, GA.
  16. Correspondence from Eleanor Herring Culpepper (Mrs. Albert Marvin Willingham), Grantville, GA, to Lew Griffin, 1976-2004.
  17. 1880 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 81, Page 202B (33), Family 262, Luthersville, Meriwether Co., GA
    George Culpepper, Self, M, Md, 72, SC, Farming, GA/SC/SC
    Perlina Culpepper, Wife, F, Md, 67, Keeping House, GA/France/GA
    Joel Culpepper, Son, M, Md, 30, Working On Farm, GA/SC/GA (ID: 32444)
    Lola Culpepper, Dau-in-Law, F, Md, 27, Keeping House, GA/GA/GA
    James Culpepper, GSon, M, S, 4, --- , GA/GA/GA
    Lola Culpepper, GDau, F, S, 7M, --- , GA/GA/GA
    John Chisohn, Other, M, S, 30, Store Keeper, AL/AL/GA
    Lea Bohanan, Other, F, S, B, 50, Cooking, GA/GA/GA.
  18. Priscilla Turner, compiler, Meriwether Co., GA Cemeteries, Spartanburg, SC: , 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Book: 975.8455 V39.
    Allen-Lee Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, near Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    + Perlina Perdue Culpepper, 27 Jun 1812 – 21 Jul 1882.
  19. Correspondence from Lewis Pitts Culpepper to Lew Griffin, circa 1997.
  20. E-mail written 1977 - 2011 to Lew Griffin & Warren Culpepper from Sara Hodnett Murphy [ID:20147], e-mail address.
  21. 1900 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 51, Page 323B (16), Family 307, Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    James D. Culpepper, Head, M, Mar 1834, 66, md 40 yrs, GA/SC/GA, Farmer
    Pherabee Culpepper, Wife, F, Oct 1836, 63, md 40 yrs, ch 8/8, GA/GA/GA
    Charlie Culpepper, Son, M, Oct 1871, 28, Sng, GA/GA/GA
    John Culpepper, Son, M, Sep 1867, 32, Sng, GA/GA/GA, Brick Mason
    George W. Culpepper, Father, M, Dec 1808, 91, Wid, SC/SC/SC.
  22. Eleanor Herring Culpepper, History of Allen-Lee Memorial Methodist Church, LaGrange, GA: Family Tree, 1987.
    p 50.

Perlina Perdue

Female, #32070, (27 Jun 1812 - 21 Jul 1882)
Father*James Perdue (27 Apr 1783 - 13 Dec 1862)
Mother*Mary Howard (c 1770 - 9 Dec 1825)
Name Variation She was also known as Lena.1 
Birth*27 Jun 1812 Perlina was born at Georgia on 27 Jun 1812.2 
Death of Mother9 Dec 1825 Her mother Mary Howard died on 9 Dec 1825 at Louina, Randolph Co., Alabama
Marriage*17 Feb 1831 She married George Washington Culpepper of Meriwether Co., GA at Forsyth, Monroe Co., Georgia, on 17 Feb 1831 at age 18. 
Married Name17 Feb 1831  As of 17 Feb 1831, her married name was Culpepper. 
Birth of Son26 Mar 1834 Her son James Daniel Culpepper was born on 26 Mar 1834 at Meriwether Co., Georgia.3 
Birth of Son8 Jul 1835 Her son John Wesley Culpepper was born on 8 Jul 1835 at Meriwether Co., Georgia.4 
Birth of Son23 Oct 1837 Her son William Jefferson Culpepper was born on 23 Oct 1837 at Meriwether Co., Georgia
Birth of Son17 May 1839 Her son Noah Smith Culpepper was born on 17 May 1839 at Meriwether Co., Georgia
1840 Census1 Jun 1840 Perlina was probably a free white female, age 20 and under 30, in George Washington Culpepper of Meriwether Co., GA's household, on the 1840 Census on 1 Jun 1840 at Meriwether Co., Georgia.5 
Birth of Son11 Oct 1842 Her son Simeon Fletcher Culpepper was born on 11 Oct 1842 at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia
Birth of Son5 Jun 1847 Her son Thomas Joel Culpepper was born on 5 Jun 1847 at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia
1850 Census1 Jun 1850 Perlina, Permelia, Thomas, Sarah, Simeon, Nancy, Noah, William, John and James listed as a household member living with George Washington Culpepper of Meriwether Co., GA on the 1850 Census on 1 Jun 1850 at Meriwether Co., Georgia.6 
Birth of Son1 Jul 1852 Her son George Green Culpepper was born on 1 Jul 1852 at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia.7 
1860 Census1 Jun 1860 Perlina, James, John, Simeon, Sarah, Thomas, Permelia, George and Fereba listed as a household member living with George Washington Culpepper of Meriwether Co., GA in the 1860 Census at Meriwether Co., Georgia.8 
Death of Father13 Dec 1862 Her father James Perdue died on 13 Dec 1862 at Monroe Co., Georgia
Death of Son8 Apr 1864 Her son William Jefferson Culpepper died on 8 Apr 1864 at Mansfield, De Soto Parish, Louisiana.9 
Death of Son16 Aug 1864 Her son John Wesley Culpepper died on 16 Aug 1864 at Fussells Mill, Henrico Co., Virginia.4 
1870 Census1 Jun 1870 Perlina, Permelia and George listed as a household member living with George Washington Culpepper of Meriwether Co., GA on the 1870 Census at Meriwether Co., Georgia.1 
Photographed*say 1880 She was photographed say 1880 at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia.10
Perlina (Perdue) Culpepper
1880 Census1 Jun 1880 Perlina was listed as George Washington Culpepper of Meriwether Co., GA's wife on the 1880 Census at Meriwether Co., Georgia.11 
Death*21 Jul 1882 She died at Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia, on 21 Jul 1882 at age 70.2 
Burial*circa 23 Jul 1882 Her body was interred circa 23 Jul 1882 at Allen-Lee Cemetery, Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., Georgia.12,2 
Biography* The George W. Culpepper Bible record for Perlina's birth was transcribed: "Perlina Perdue was born June 27th 1812." Her Baptism was also recorded: "Baptized by Noah Smith Perlina Culpepper and her four sons on the 27th day of September A D 1839 The above four sones are the eldest sones of G. W. Culpepper and Perlina his wife." Finally, the record of her death was preserved in the same Bible: "Perlina Culpepper departed this [life] quietly and peacefully as she had lived Friday 25th of July 1882. Recorded by her Bereaved husband." According to a perpetual calendar, in 1882, the nearest Friday would have fallen on the 21st which is the date that was recorded on Perlina's tombstone.
      A 58 year old "Lena" born in Georgia was recorded (p. 344 #548) with her husband, George W. Culpepper and their youngest children, Florence and George in the 1870 census of the Greenville P.O. District, Meriwether Co., GA. A 67 year old "Perlina" born in Georgia was recorded (ED 81-33) living with her husband "George Culpepper" and their son Joel and his young family. 

Family

George Washington Culpepper of Meriwether Co., GA (6 Dec 1808 - 20 Dec 1901)
Marriage*17 Feb 1831 She married George Washington Culpepper of Meriwether Co., GA at Forsyth, Monroe Co., Georgia, on 17 Feb 1831 at age 18. 
Children
Last Edited27 Feb 2008

Citations

  1. 1870 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 344B, Family 548, Greenville PO, Meriwether Co., GA
    George W. Culpepper, 62, M, Farmer, $200/$500, GA
    Lena Culpepper, 58, F, GA
    Florence Culpepper, 21, F, GA
    George Culpepper, 18, M, GA.
  2. Priscilla Turner, compiler, Meriwether Co., GA Cemeteries, Spartanburg, SC: , 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Book: 975.8455 V39.
    Allen-Lee Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, near Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    + Perlina Perdue Culpepper, 27 Jun 1812 – 21 Jul 1882.
  3. Priscilla Turner, compiler, Meriwether Co., GA Cemeteries, Spartanburg, SC: , 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Book: 975.8455 V39.
    Allen-Lee Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, near Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    + James Daniel Culpepper, 26 Mar 1834 – 1 Nov 1903, Pvt., Co. B, 1st GA Cav.
  4. Priscilla Turner, compiler, Meriwether Co., GA Cemeteries, Spartanburg, SC: , 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Book: 975.8455 V39.
    Allen-Lee Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, near Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    + John W. Culpepper, 8 Jul 1835 - 16 Aug 1864, 1 Lt, Co. D, 8th GA Inf
    (Marker, only. Buried at battlefield in VA).
  5. 1840 Federal Census, United States.
    Page 111, Unk Twp, Meriwether Co., GA
    George W. Culpepper, 3 M0-5, 1 M5-10, 1 M20-30, 1 F20-30.
  6. 1850 Federal Census, United States.
    Pages 312B-313A, 59th District, Meriwether Co., GA
    G. W. Culpepper, 41, M, Farmer, $1,175, SC
    Perlina Culpepper, 38, F, GA
    J. D. Culpepper, 16, M, GA
    J. W. Culpepper, 13, M, GA
    W. J. Culpepper, 12, M, GA
    N. S. Culpepper, 10, M, GA
    N. L. Culpepper, 9, F, GA
    S. F. Culpepper, 7, M, GA
    S. E. Culpepper, 4, F, GA
    L. J. Culpepper, 3, M, GA
    P. F. Culpepper, 1, F, GA.
  7. Priscilla Turner, compiler, Meriwether Co., GA Cemeteries, Spartanburg, SC: , 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Book: 975.8455 V39.
    Allen-Lee Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, near Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    + George G. Culpepper, 1 Jul 1852 – 16 Mar 1928.
  8. Pages 415-416, Lutherville PO, Meriwether Co., GA
    George W. Culpepper, 50, M, Farmer, $2000/$2000, SC
    Paulina Culpepper, 48, F, GA
    James D. Culpepper, 26, M, GA
    Feraba Culpepper, 23, F, GA
    John W. Culpepper, 24, M, GA
    Simeon F. Culpepper, 17, M, GA
    Sallie E. Culpepper, 15, F, GA
    Joel Culpepper, 13, M, GA
    Permelia Culpepper, 11, F, GA
    George Culpepper, 8, M, GA.
  9. Priscilla Turner, compiler, Meriwether Co., GA Cemeteries, Spartanburg, SC: , 1993, Repository: LDS Family History Library - Salt Lake City, Call No. US/CAN Book: 975.8455 V39.
    Allen-Lee Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, near Lone Oak, Meriwether Co., GA
    + William Jefferson Culpepper, 25 Oct 1837 - 8 Apr 1864, Co. F, 17th TX Cav.
    (Marker, only. Buried at battlefield in LA).
  10. Correspondence from Eleanor Herring Culpepper (Mrs. Albert Marvin Willingham), Grantville, GA, to Lew Griffin, 1976-2004.
  11. 1880 Federal Census, United States.
    ED 81, Page 202B (33), Family 262, Luthersville, Meriwether Co., GA
    George Culpepper, Self, M, Md, 72, SC, Farming, GA/SC/SC
    Perlina Culpepper, Wife, F, Md, 67, Keeping House, GA/France/GA
    Joel Culpepper, Son, M, Md, 30, Working On Farm, GA/SC/GA (ID: 32444)
    Lola Culpepper, Dau-in-Law, F, Md, 27, Keeping House, GA/GA/GA
    James Culpepper, GSon, M, S, 4, --- , GA/GA/GA
    Lola Culpepper, GDau, F, S, 7M, --- , GA/GA/GA
    John Chisohn, Other, M, S, 30, Store Keeper, AL/AL/GA
    Lea Bohanan, Other, F, S, B, 50, Cooking, GA/GA/GA.
  12. Eleanor Herring Culpepper, History of Allen-Lee Memorial Methodist Church, LaGrange, GA: Family Tree, 1987.
    p 50.